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Full text of "Hardware merchandising (January-June 1901)"

Library 

of the 

University of Toronto 



tet the Best. 

Extra 1, 2, and 3. 
ANGWELL'S BABBIT, Montreal 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades in Canada- 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 5, 1901. 



NO. I 



"TANDEM" ANTI-FRICTION METAL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 

A 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other for their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 

QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed, 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH ft McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




Poultry Netting. 



Specify Lysaght's make, which is always 
well woven, thoroughly galvanized, and 
true to length, width and gauge. 

Netting galvanized after weaving is 
the safest and most durable. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, 
MONTREAL. 




JOHN LYSAGHT, LIM 



TED. 



n sf^~ ^ /J (/problem of I 




Confidence means success — past, present, 
success. The SafTord Radiators were never 
wanting in a single, vital part. They solve the 
problem of Steam or Hot-Water Heating, because — hav- 
ing no joints they ca"hnot leak, standing a pressure of 140 
lbs. to the square inch they cannot break, having no ob- 
structions in the pipes the heat circulates freely in one 
minute after the heat is turned on. 



The Safford Radiators 

are light, 
yet strong — handsome as a Radiator can be. They fit 
circles, curves, angles. There are twenty-five different 
styles. They are the Radiators of Confidence — the original 
invention in screw threaded nipple connections. Send for 
our free, illustrated Booklet — it will give you "Confidence" 
in the largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British flag. 



The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, 



TORONTO, ONT. 






Seasonable Goods 



OUR SELECTIONS ARE 



ENGLISH CUTLERY 



CONSISTING OF 



st CARVERS E- KNIVES 

IN SETS AND CASES. 

BRASS KETTLES s SEES CHAFING DISHES. 



■ »* 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



Limited. 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets, — .TORONTO. 



THE- 



Abbott-Mitchell 
Iron and Steel Company 



3 
1 

of ONTARIO, LIMITED. 



Manufacturers of . . . 

Bar Iron and Steel -, 
| Nails, Spikes 
| Horse Shoes . . 
i Bolts, Washers, etc. 

iiUWlUiWUliUUUUlUiUlUU4iUiUiUiUWIUlUUtUiiUiUiUiUiUUUttlUiUlUiUWiU4UiUiUUiiUiUiUWK 



Belleville, 
Ontario. 



3 
3 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Garden Hose 



/ 







< 



•n 



RT NORTHY. 
EucudAve 

TORONTO. 

Sample ofHoseinhis 
use for Eleven Years 



i 



Disg&tffits for the new season 
\* now out. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



* 



CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 



Montreal. 



Toronto. 



Winnipeg. 



DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 



1 THE NEW BALDWIN 

! 

I 
I 
I 

\ 
\ 
\ 
i 
t 
t 

i 

i 



BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation — 
Sanitary — Odorless. 
Latest Cleanahle Fea- 
tures—The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Looks 
Bail-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Rubber around Boors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. ^ 
Handsome Besigns. 
Moderate Prices. 




Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the East, 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; special 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 






SOME OF THE NEWER "VANI/ET" Tfifll Q 

m . nun W mjk I JM W 1L I & .# V I ft. J 




NO. 41 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN HANDLE 




NO. 42 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN BOX. 




NO. 50 RECIPROCATING DRILL, FOR WOOD OR METALS- 

Sold by Leading Jobbers NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

throughout the Dominion. Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



W 



Established I860. 




HERE YOU HAVE THEM. 



THE 

HOTTEST, 

NEATEST, 

CLE A IS EST, 

STRONGEST, 

CHEAPEST, 

HEATERS 

ON THE MARKET. 

No small parts to break, 
easily cleaned and filled, 
made of best materials, 
they ensure greatest dur- 
ability. 

Built on honor, they 
never fail to satisfy. 

You cannot afford to be 
without them. 

Write us for 
Prices. 



Incorporated 1895. 




The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL. 



BLACK SHEETS 



Common, 
Dead Flat, 



Imitation Russia , 
Genuine Russia. 



STANDARD SIZES IN STOCK. SPECIAL SIZES FOR IMPORT. 
PRICES ON APPLICATION. 



SAMUEL, SONS ft BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



^ jr TTT T|T ^^ ^ STARR MFG. CO'S 

^% J^^ JTx X *^ yj^ standard lines of 

======;ii;i====i== ^^^^^ Acme and Hockey Skates 

also UNION HARDWARE CO'S Hockey. 



Toronto Office: 

32 Front St.West 

H. T. Eager. 




Branch House: 

George D. Wood 
& Co., 

Winnipeg. 



LADIES' SKATE WITH LEATHER ANKLE SUPPORT. 



YYR1TE FOR PRICES 



"O 



Wood, Vallance & Co., - Hamilton 



EASILY THE LEADER IN 

ELEGANCE, 

EFFICIENCY 

and ECONOMY. 



THE. 



if 



GOOD CHEER ART 



n 



BASE BURNER. 



-SECOND YEAR- 






Don't wait until the last moment, but ORDER NOW. 

It will help us in estimating requirements and 
will assure you prompt shipment. 



!£ Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co. 



WOODSTOCK, ONT. 



Limited 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Demand for our 

MPERIAL OXFOR 

kitchen range increases daily. 

Every one sold causes other sales, so enthusiastic are 
householders over its improved features. 

ITS EASE OF REGULATION 
ECONOMY IN USING FUEL 
DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRA.W-OUT OVEN RACK 

and other conveniences, give it a superiority quickly 
appreciated. 

You're sure of speedy sales when handling the 
Imperial Oxford. Write us for full information and 
price, list if you have none in stock. • 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 




THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



David Maxwell & Sons 




ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 

" Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, 
and Detachable Driving Link Improved for sea- 
son of igoi. Steel or Wood Frame as desired. 



High and Low Wheels, 
from Il-in. to so-in. 
widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and Cutting 

Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different 
Sizes. 



these articles 



.SEND DIRECT TO US. 



Steel Frame. 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



OUR NEW YEAR 
WISHES. 



We wish to convey to the hard- 
ware trade and every purchaser of 
our "Q" brand horse shoe nails 
in Canada, our sincere appreciation 
of their orders during the past year. 

Our aim shall be in the year 1901 
and the century upon which we 
have now entered, to adhere to our 
high standard for quality and to 
spare no efforts on our part to main- 
tain the position accorded to the 
"Ql" brand for the past 35 years, 
as being the best horse shoe 
nail in Canada and without 
a superior anywhere. 

The quality is the best; 
the workmanship is the 
best ; the patterns are the 
best, and they sell the 
best, and are the best for 
you to buy. The best 
resolution you can make for the 
year 1901 is to sell the best horse 
nails only, in which case your trade 
is ours. 



RETURNED 
TO 

office. 
MAR 11 1902 






CANADA 
HORSE NAIL 
COMPANY 



MONTREAL. 



1 ^MMkik^ 



N> 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




Living Facts are better than dead issues. 



VWWWWWWWWWW1 




"Plymouth" 

Binder Twine 



appeals successfully to live, goahead dealers. 

A wise dealer always takes advantage of a popular 
demand — that's one reason why it pays to sell "Plymouth," 
and another is that the selection of " Plymouth " for the 

Government farms was not made haphazard, but after careful practical test 

had demonstrated it to be the 



1 THE STAMP OF 

2 EXCELLENCE. 



44 Plymouth" is sure, always uniform. 



Plymouth Binder Twine Agency, McKinnon BIdg., Helinda St., Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 






1901 



Dondas Axes 



are up-to-date in appearance 
and second to none in quality. 



Dundas Axe Works 

DUNDAS, CANADA. 




VanTuyl 4 Fairbank 



Potrolla, Ont. 
Headquarters for . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps, Casing, Tubing 
Fittings, Drilling 
Tools, Cables, etc. 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon 



tc 




BRASSITE 



» 



*e, 




KNOX HENRY, - Canadian Agent, 220^ Board of Trade, 



^reneD trad* * 



None genuine without the 
above "Trade Mark." 

"Gunn's" 

Patent 

"Brassite" 

Goods. 

Equal to Solid Brass in every 
particular. Cost less money- — 
look and wear as well. Our 
sales are increasing all the time. 
Why not increase your sales ? 

THE CUI CASTOR CO. 

Limited. 

MONTREAL. 











• 






The Annual Special 






Number of HARD- 






WARE and Metal 






will be issued March 






9th this year, about 
two weeks earlier 
than corresponding 




• 


issues in the past. 







T THE AUER 
GASOLINE 
LAMP 




No. 9, 
200 Candle Power 



Suitable for 

STORE, 
RESIDENCE 
0R CHURCH. 



The only Lamp on the Canadian market which 
is guaranteed not to clog, flicker or smell. 

YOUR MONEY BACK IF NOT ENTIRELY SATISFIED. 



For Catalogues and Prices on Lamps, Mantles and Sundries, 
write 

AUER LIGHT CO. 

1682 Notre Dame St., MONTREAL. 

E. SIMPSON & CO., Moose Jaw, Agents for the Territories. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW TO SAVE CAS Peebles' Automatic Gas G 



overnors 







Gas, Fire and Stove Governor. House Governor Burner. Governor for Incandescents. Mercurial Governor for Fixing at Meter 

Sole Manufacturers, D. BRUCE PEEBLES & CO., Tay Works, Edinburgh, Scotland. 



Incorporated 
1851. 



WESTERN 

H ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire and Marine 

Capital, subscribed $2,000,000.00 

Capital - - - 1,000,000.00 

Assets, over - - 2,340,000.00 

Annual Income - 2,290,000.00 

Head Office: TORONTO. ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. J.J. Kenny, Vice-President 
C. C. Foster, Secretary. 




Wire Guards 



FOR 



Store Fronts 

Factory and Mill Windows 

Basement Windows 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 



LIMITED 




HAMILTON, ONT , AND MONTREAL, QUE. 



KEMP'S 

Broad-Hoop 
Roll-Rim 




Milk Can Bottoms 

possess all the points which go to make perfection in Can Bottoms. They have been 
used by a criticizing public for two seasons, and their popularity is evidence of the 
satisfaction which they gave. The roll rim has no sharp turns, which break the grain 
of the metal and lessen its wearing qualities. It has a broad wearing surface and will 
not damage floors. They do not cost more than inferior bottoms. 

The Iron Clad Trimmings are made the same as the Broad Hoop, and differ from 
them only in having a narrower and thicker hoop, which does not require the roll-rim, 
and, therefore, can be sold cheaper. 



Manufactured by 



^_Tor durability and finish, our Trimmings are unequalled. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., 



Toronto, 
Canada. 




VOL. XIII. MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 5, 1901. NO. I. 

President, relieving steamers on the St. Lawrence A GOOD YEAR IN TORONTO. 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. River. ' I 'HE past year has been a satisfactory 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO It is said that the idea of the formation of one to all connected with building 

Limited. tne new company arose out of the depart- operations in Toronto. The report of 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- U re from Montreal, in the last days of the city commissioner for the year shows 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, , 

North-WeBt Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, November, of four vessels, belonging to the that permits have been taken out for the 

Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. Algoma Central Railway Co., carrying steel erection of buildings with a total value of 
Island and Newfoundland. 

offices rails, without any insurance. Mr. F. H. $1,957,274, against ^2,010,996 the previous 

Montreal - - - - Board of Trade Building. Clergue, of Sault Ste. Marie, came to year, showing a decrease of about $50,000. 

Toronto 10 Front street East. Montreal at the time and found, to his This, in view of the fact that 1899 was the 

lelepnone 2140, ' ^^ 

London, enq 109 Fleet street^E.e.. extreme annoyance, that he could place no best year since 1892, and that it was equal 

MANCHESTER, ENG. - - - 18 St Ann Street! .. . „ j- * 1 n^.o v-jl i.r 

H. s. Ashburner, insurance on the boats. He immediately 101896 and 1897 combined, shows a lot of 

WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block. •'.*.« ^t ... ,.~ 

j. j. Roberts, set to work and founded a "St. Lawrence building was done in Toronto last year. 

ST. JOHN, N. B. - - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

I. Hunter white, Lloyds " by the aid of Montreal financiers. But not only has the volume of trade done 

NEW YORK. 176 E. 88th Street, ' J 

w.j.Brandt. The capital of the company is set at $5,- being larger, but it has been more remuner- 

Travelling Subscription Agents : „ .. , , _. , . . , 

T. Donaghy. F. s. Millard. ooo.ooo. By this means the organizers ative than usual. The high range of prices 

Subscription, Canada and the United states, $2.00. hope to solve the difficulty of Canadian for materials and the high wages paid had 

Great Britain and elsewhere - - ■ 12s. 

Published every Saturday. marine insurance rates. not been followed up by contractors as they 

Cable Address \ t <*script, London The same company hope to keep navi- might have been in previous years. Then 

gation of the St. Lawrence open a few the talk of a strike and the consequent 

weeks longer each fall by the employment discussion last spring as to the cost of ma- 

of a powerful ice-breaker, many plans of terials spread abroad enough information to 

which have been before Montreal business make householders expect high prices, and 

men during the last few months. make it easier for contractors to get them. 

A noticeable fact is that there is no falling 

Failure to accomplish all that was desired off }n the erection of buildings for industria l 

THE ST. LAWRENCE LLOYDS. i,- t VMr chonlrl exrite and not retard the . . , ~,. 

last year snouia excite, ana not retard, tne and comrne rcial purposes. There has been 

THE fruits of the agitation that has efforts in this the New Year ,. , ^ • ^ i. r • 

enons in ims, me iNew lear. a sllght decrease in the number of resi- 

been going on for some time for the , , . 
dences erected, put permits to the value of 
lowering of marine insurance on CONSOLIDATED COMPANIES. 

$988,000 have been taken for warehouses, 

vessels trading in the St. Lawrence channel, "The Consolidations and Listed Stock . 

offices and factones, as compared with 
Canada's national waterway, are at last Companies of the Iron and Allied Trades " 

$724,000 the previous year. The extension 
appearing. is the title of a supplement to The Iron Age. 

r of these works is all the more satisfactory in 

Mr. Louis Boyer, of the legal firm of It consists of 56 large pages, and gives the . 

. view of the fact that there will thus be given 
Dandurand, Brodeur & Boyer, Montreal, capital stock, the productive capacity, 

, employment to more labor, and thus necessi- 
has given notice in the official Gazette of names of directors, etc., of the large com- 

. ; tate the erection of more dwelling houses in 
application for an Act to incorporate "The binations allied to the iron and steel trades 

, ,..-,.',- the future. 

St. Lawrence Lloyds ' ' for the purpose of which have been formed in the United States 

carrying on an ocean and inland marine during the last few years. The supplement When you turn over a new leaf, there is 

insurance business with the right to main- is a valuable contribution to the subject nothing like will-power to keep it from being 

tain and navigate ice-breaking and wreck- with which it deals. blown back. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWAREMEN AND PRICES. 



HARDWAREMEN should conform 
their prices to market conditions, 
just as a mariner sets the sails of 
his vessel to meet weather conditions. 

Necessity compels him to do so if he is 
to make his business a success. 

The man of business, like the yachtsman, 
must ever be on the alert to grasp oppor- 
tunities to facilitate his progress. This 
means, paradoxical as it may seem, that he 
has got to conform his prices to the con- 
dition of the market, whether it be reducing 
them or advancing them. 

Hardwaremen, as a rule, are not slow in 
following the market when it is declining. 
Competition compels them to do so. And 
it is wise that they should do so, for, if they 
do not, they will be handicapped in the 
race for trade. 

But, the fact that they are compelled to 
follow the market when its tendency is 
downward emphasizes the necessity for 
their following it with equal readiness when 
the tendency is upward. 

Of course, this is more easily said than 
done, but, just as competition facilitates the 
downward tendency of prices, so a little 
understanding among the merchants in a 
community would assist them in advancing 
their prices to a basis warranted by the con- 
dition ot the general market. 



PERSONALITY IN BUSINESS. 

IT is not surprising that the phrase, "the 
man behind the gun " became popular 
throughout the Empire. There is so 
much of generality in our songs as well as 
in conversation that this definite reference 
to the personality responsible for the results 
produced won natural approval. 

It is the same everywhere. Business 
men discuss this man's store ; that man's 
windows ; the advertisements of another. 
We even go to the extent of imitating what 
we consider he has done well. 

But, after all, it is not the store in which a 
man starts his business or the amount of 
goods he is able to stock that is the best 
criterion of his probable success. It is 
rather the man himself. There are some 
men who would succeed in the face of seem- 
ingly insurmountable difficulties, and there 



are others who would fail where everything 
is most advantageous, and between these 
two classes are practically all the rest. A 
man's business, store, window, advertising, 
clerks, are pretty much what he makes of 
them. 

Therefore, it would be well for business 
men generally to spend a few days during 
the opening weeks of the new century 
studying themselves to see wherein they 
lack in the qualities that go to make a man 
successful. 



UNSALABLE GOODS. 

THERE is in every store at the end of 
the year goods which have proved 
unsalable. The measure of them is 
largely in proportion to the ability of the 
merchant as a buyer. But, whatever the 
reason, the fact that there are goods on the 
shelves which should have been sold makes 
it evident that something should be done to 
dispose of them. 

Whenever the wideawake merchant finds 
himself thus situated, he marks the price of 
such goods down until he has found cus- 
tomers. And not only does he mark them 
down, but he adopts ways and means to 
acquaint the public of the fact. 

He will probably start a bargain •ounter. 
He is also likely to make a display in his 
window, while advertising he, of course, 
does not overlook. 

Aside altogether from the inconvenience 
of having goods in stock which cumber the 
ground, it is to be remembered that every 
dealer tied up in such a way means so much 
capital unrenumerative. There is no doubt 
about that. And it is well that every 
merchant who hesitates to mark a line of 
goods down to a figure which will probably 
make it attractive to buyers should remem- 
ber this. 

Every dollar that is not earning is help- 
ing to eat up the merchant's substance. 



MORE REASON TO HOPE. 

After an interview with the New Bruns- 
wick Government, Messrs. Chas. Burrill 
and B. F. Pearson, directors of The Do- 
minion Iron and Steel Co., are reported to 
have said that within a year they would be 
building steel ships at St. John and Halifax. 



Five million dollars will be invested in two 
plants. Two thousand to three thousand 
hands will be employed. 

The Government seems to look favorably 
upon the project and a subsidy will likely 
be granted. 

PUTTY IS HIGHER. 

A CHANGE is announced this week 
in the price of putty, quotations 
being 5c. per 100 lb. higher on 
bulk in barrels and 10 to 15c. on bladder 
in barrels. 
The old and the new prices are now as 

follows : 

New Old 
prices, prices. 

Bulk in barrels $2 00 Si 95 

Bulk in less quantity 215 2 10 

Bladder in barrels 2 20 210 

Bladder in 100 or 200-lb. kegs or 

boxes, or loose 2 35 2 25 

Bladder in 25-lb. tins in 100-lb. 

lots 2 45 2 35 

Bladder in I2j4-lb. tins in 100- 

lb. lots 2 75 2 60 

Bladder, bulk or tins in less than 

100-lb. lots 3 00 2 80 

The above figures are f.o.b. Montreal, 
Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph. Freights may be equalized from 
Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto. 

Quotations for the Maritime Provinces 
are 10c. per 100-lb. higher than those for 
the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 

SHEETS AND PLATES. 

THERE is nothing in the present con- 
dition of the market for plates and 
sheets that would indicate a lower 
range of values, at any rate for several 
months to come. We gather this from the 
perusal of the correspondence of a well- 
known metal house in Toronto. 

Its correspondence is with several manu- 
facturing firms in Great Britain and in the 
United States. For example, one of the 
largest manufacturing firms in Pittsburg says 
that, owing to the large number of orders 
on its books, it will be impossible to make 
delivery of sheets till June. A British con- 
cern reports that the mills are so loaded up 
with orders that only present stocks are 
available, while several firms report that 
they will be unable to make delivery of 
plates and sheets earlier than February and 
March. 

Jobbers in this country are being some- 
what inconvienced by this condition of 
affairs. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



A WISE CHOICE FOR PRESIDENT. 

THE St. John, N.B , Board of Trade 
showed good judgment in electing 
G. Wetmore Merritt to the presidency 
of that institution for the coming year. 
Mr. Merritt is not only a keen business 
man, but his interests are various and his 
connection so widespread that he should 
make a first-class president. 

Mr. Merritt, who is a partner in the 
wholesale grocery firm of Merritt Bros. & 
Co., started his business life as a clerk with 
Turnbull & Co., wholesale grocers, St. 
John, in 1873. Eleven years 
later he was admitted into 
partnership, under the old 
style, which remained un- 
changed until 1893, when Mr. 
Turnbull retired from active 
business, and the present firm 
was formed, Mr. Turnbull 
continuing as a special partner 
till January 31, 1896. 

In addition to his grocery 
business, Mr. Merritt is inter- 
ested, to a large extent, in 
lumbering, gold and coal min- 
ing, and in the steamship carry- 
ing business. His investments 
in all these lines are reputed 
to be particularly successful. 

In every way Mr. Merritt 
has proved himself deeply in- 
terested in the commercial 
development of St. John, most 
of his work in that respect 
being done through his con- 
nection with the board of trade 
of that city. 



support of its church. Pastors are under 
the general stress to save money by not 
spending it, and no class of men are sub- 
jected to more anxiety, as a rule, than they 
in finding the revenue wherewith to main- 
tain property intrusted to their care. They 
naturally, but mistakenly, object to opening 
doors and windows of places of religious 
meeting during the cold weather. People 
are always to be found to complain if a 
church be cold, others if it be warm. Pastor 
and sexton alike try to meet an average 
standard by starting the furnaces none too 






fSti/ff 



CHURCH VENTILATION. 

Official inspection finds 
Chicago churches, says The 
Chronicle, uniformly defective 
in means of purifying the air. 
That germ diseases may be 
widely disseminated through 
places of assembly is a fact so 
well established that it is in- 
cumbent upon all ecclesiastical I 

authorities to take note of it. 
In plague times prohibition of pilgrimages 
and dispersion of caravans has been the 
first indispensable to extirpation of a scourge. 
It is a pathetic commentary on the supposed 
advance of the building arts that in places 
of religious worship there should be uniform 
and complete lack of ventilating appliances 
other than doors and windows. 

After a sexton has started furnace fires in 
a church he is expected, as a rule, to avoid 
waste of the heat thus expensively produced. 
Whether a congregation be rich or poor, or 
composed of various categories of good 
fortune, it contributes reluctantly to the 




Q. WETMORE MERRITT. 



many cases, will throw off unavoidable 
morbid germs caught up in the swirl of a 
town or developed in unsanitary homes. 
Ventilation of churches and schools ought 
to be deemed of paramount importance in a 
great city, where of necessity all manner of 
people are compelled to have closest bodily 
contact with every other manner of people, 
juvenile, adult and senile, bathed and 
unbathed. 

This necessity is aptly illustrated in an 
incident which happened in a public school 
since the arrival of frost this year. A 
kindergarten teacher undertook 
to loosen the jacket of a boy in 
order that he might more com- 
fortably participate in gymnastic 
exercises. " Please, don't, ' 
gently protested the lad. "I'm 
sewed up for the winter." 

A complete change of air 
ought to be effected by throw- 
ing open all the windows and 
doors at least before and after 
each church service. Venti- 
lation of school rooms should 
be accomplished with corres- 
ponding frequency and thor- 
oughness. 



soon and sealing up the edifice for the day 
after combustion begins to raise the temper- 
ature. 

For these reasons, for which neither 
sexton nor pastor should be held blame- 
worthy, the air in most churches is noxious 
during winter. 

Air is especially liable to be exhausted or 
corrupted in the most popular churches 
where more than one service is held in a 
day. A thousand people gathered together 
within walls anywhere will throw off enough 
animal heat to raise temperature, and, in 



A BUSINESS MEN'S 
LEAGUE. 

Notice is given in the Official 
Gazette that application will be 
made to the Quebec Legislature 
by Henry Miles, importer ; 
Fred W. Evans, insurance 
manager ; Charles Chaput, 
merchant ; James W. Knox, 
merchant ; George E. Drum- 
mond, manufacturer, all of 
Montreal, for a bill to incor- 
porate them and others under 
the name of the ' ' Montreal 
Business Men's League," with 
the following objects : To 
promote and develop tourist 
and sportsmen travel in] Que- 
bec Province; to encourage and 
facilitate the holding of con- 
ventions and other gathering; 
in the city of Montreal ; to promote muni- 
cipal improvements therein, more especially 
with regard to the cleanliness of streets 
and the embellishment of parks and 
squares, and other objects of a kindred 
character. 



ANSWERS TO INQUIRERS. 

A Hartford, Ont., subscriber writes : "We are 
in a position here to get what is known as cat tails. 
Can you inform me who are handlers of the same ? 
I saw in some paper that furniture or upholstering 
firms used them for stuffing." 

[Remarks : Can any of our readers supply 

the desired information ? — The Editor.] 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS. 

SOME PERTINENT SUGGESTIONS FROM ONE WHO HAS SUCCEEDED. 



JUST now, when prosperity is in every- 
body's mouth, and when hosts of new 
business enterprises are likely to be 
launched and hosts of old ones reorganized, 
it may be timely to consider the general 
subject of success in business. 

Statisticians tell us that 98 per cent, of 
all persons who embark in business on their 
own account fail at one period or another 
in their lives. 

Did it ever occur to the reader how great 
a loss to the whole community is involved 
in the large percentage of failures? asks 
J. E. S. in News -Tribune. It is suffered not 
alone in the great mass of bad debts, which 
after the failure occurs have to be borne by 
creditors, but every unprofitable business 
carried on at a loss, often a long time 
before the collapse comes, is a direct injury 
to every legitimate enterprise in the same 
line with which it comes into competition. 
It is an obvious wrong for one concern, 
which pays its employes regularly, and 
meets all its obligations honestly, to have to 
suffer the competition of another concern 
which is living on its creditors. Legiti- 
mately conducted business is unjustly as- 
sailed by rotten concerns, and every man 
who pays his debts indirectly has to bear 
a share of the losses entailed by those who 
do not pay. 

The question arises, is failure in business 
avoidable ? Would it be possible to reverse 
the figures and have but two per cent, of 
failures to 98 per cent, of successes ? Would 
not the prosperity of the whole community 
be enhanced by such a condition ? I be- 
lieve all these may be answered in the 
affirmative. 

How may it be done ? 

1. By the exercise of judgment in the 
choice of a field of business. The estab- 
lishment of an art store or a jewelry store in 
a locality frequented only by a poor class of 
people one can readily see would be an act 
of folly. Such folly, only varying in 
degree, too often attends the establishment 
of a business enterprise. The question of 
adequacy of the field is not sufficiently con- 
sidered. By choosing a comparatively 
unoccupied field capital is not wasted in 
driving another occupant from it. I think 
it is generally the safer and wiser policy to 
buy out a prior occupant than to waste 
capital and energy in driving him out. 
But, in any case, there must be a field 
adequate to the business expected to be 
done. 

2. The scale of one's business must be 
adjusted both to the field and to the extent 
of his capital. The man who attempts to 



do a business which should command a 
capital of #50,000 with only $10,000 to 
work with, takes a great chance of making 
a failure of it. Nor must borrowing be 
relied upon. There should be sufficient 
capital in a business to create a condition 
of easiness, and where the capital is in 
excess of the needs it is an additional 
guarantee of success, provided the business 
is conducted with the same careful conser- 
vatism that it would be on a smaller capital. 
A successful business, I confidently assert, 
may be established on any amount of capi- 
tal, no matter how limited, but the amount 
of business undertaken must be propor- 
tioned according to it. 

3 . I believe it will be found to be true, as 
a rule, that the most successful businesses 
have been begun in a small way and have 
grown up, while the large percentage of 
failures have occurred in cases where it has 
been set out to create a large business from 
the outset. It is the order of nature for 
things to grow up, and not come into exist- 
tence full fledged, and I believe the rule 
applies preeminently in the realm of busi- 
ness. Many a legitimate business may be 
started upon a $500 capital, and may grow 
to become a great concern, but the projector 
must at the outset put himself in direct 
competition with rivals enjoying 20 times 
the capital, nor seek to grow too rapidly. 

4. Do not borrow the capital to start upon, 
or any considerable portion of it. It is not 
safe. There are two important reasons for 
this : One is that the interest and repay- 
ment are a burden upon the business which 
it ought not to be subject to ; the other is 
the fact that the sense of responsibility is 
much greater where a person is dealing 
absolutely with his own, and he is more 
likely to employ his means with wisdom and 
safety than where he is operating at 
another's risk. 

5. Every business man should not only 
thoroughly understand bookkeeping, but 
should, to an extent, keep his own books. 
There is only one person in a concern who 
knows exactly all the time the true condition 
of the business, that is the bookkeeper. He 
may submit statements and trial balances 
and balance sheets to his principals, but in 
rare instances he can communicate by them 
that subtle knowledge which comes of daily 
and hourly familiarity with the accounts. 
The proprietor who does not keep his own 
books is always at a disadvantage, and he 
who does not understand the science is in 
absolute peril. I have no doubt that a very 
large share of the failures result from the 
ignorance of the true condition of one's 



business. The keeping of books is not an 
uninteresting occupation, especially where 
one has a personal interest in the results. I 
know a millionaire merchant who, until 
compelled by advancing age and infirmities 
to entrust the work to others, always kept 
his own ledger, his bookkeeper's work 
extending only to the journalizing and bill 
making. In large houses where this may 
be impracticable, a new system has come 
into vogue by which a secondary ledger is 
kept for the special use of the proprietor, in 
which the transactions are summed up in 
compact shape. If the entries in this could 
be made by the principal himself, the ad- 
vantages of the system would be still in- 
creased. 

6. Another frequent cause for business 
failure is indiscretion in giving credit. I 
imagine it is a very common thing for a 
man with a moderate capital to engage in 
the retail grocery business ; in his zeal to 
gain business he gives credit to a host of 
irresponsible persons, and in the course of 
a few months discovers that his entire 
capital is absorbed in uncollectable ac- 
counts. Of course he has to give up, and 
another person comes in to repeat the 
experience. Wholesale houses do the same 
thing on a larger scale. For a small 
margin of profit they will risk the entire 
value of the goods sold. Every bankrupt 
house will be able to show you a long array 
of bad accounts, which, if they could have 
been collected, would have averted the 
failure. 

And there is no use in catering to a dead- 
beat custom. Better far to keep the goods 
and lose the customer. A good plan is to 
have an understanding with the customer 
at the time of the sale as to when payment 
is to be made. A debtor will often pay at 
a time he has promised to, where he would 
allow the debt to run indefinitely where 
there is no date of payment fixed. Then, 
too, if there is an agreement to pay at a 
certain time and default is made, there is 
no reasonable obligation to further increase 
the credit, and the merchant may get off 
with a small loss, where by a looser system 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^ 

Prompt Shipmen'u 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 




THE BEST PAINTING MATERIAL 

on the market to-day is good prepared paint. 
The best prepared paint on the market is 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

S.-W. P. is better than white lead and oil because it contain 
zinc white to prevent the chalking and powdering of the 

Because it covers 360 square feet — often more — two 
the gallon. 

Because it is absolutely pure. 

Because it is always uniform in color and quality, 

Because the linseed oil in it is specially preparj 
color — there's no oil so good in any other paint. 

Because machinery can grind finer and mix n 
than hand work — giving paint in which the oil a 
together better and present a more solid surface for 
against. 





New Way-Making S.-W. 
by Machinery. 



faner and clearer in color, 
more durable gloss. 
in all climates — it won't powder or chalk as lead 
'always do. 

jnakes painting cost less through its greater covering 
ter durability. 
' works easier under the brush. 

jaint requirement S.-W. P. is better than lead and oil and 
as a painting material all over Canada, just as it has in the 
;s ajjf other parts of the world. 

IHead and oil were the best paint we would make S.-W. P. from lead 
and oil alone. We've no more interest in lead than in zinc, or in zinc 
than in lead. Our whole interest is in good paint and we know that the 
best good paint is made by a combination of lead and zinc with the 
linseed oil. 

The dealers who have given up pushing lead and oil and are taking 
hold of S.-W. P. prove what we have just said by their success. 



»»k The Old Way-Making Paint by Hand. 



CANADIAN DIVISION: 

MONTREAL, 

21 St. Antolne St. 
TORONTO, 

86 York Street. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



CLEVELAND. 
CHICAGO. 



NEW YORK. 
MONTREAL. 



BOSTON. 
TORONTO. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



it would be difficult to close the account, 
and a more serious loss would result. 

If an absolutely cash business cannot 
be done, the next best thing is to have the 
terms of the sale distinctly understood. It 
is a common plan with the larger retail 
houses to render statements at the end of 
each month and expect payment on or 
before the tenth of the following month. 
Where customers are held rigidly to this rule, 
the losses by bad debts are probably very 
small, I have observed that the debtor always 
gives first attention to the payment of the 
bills of those who are most strict in insisting 
upon a prompt payment, and leaves to the 
last those bills rendered by easier, more 
careless or more good-natured dealers ; and 
so, in case of inability to ultimately pay all, 
these easy ones have to sufif&L It is never 
a cause for ill feeling on tnWpart of an 
honest buyer that the seller insisflLupon the 
prompt payment for the goods sold^If one 
is disposed to resent it, he is just the^cus- 
tomer that it will be profitable' to lose. ^* 

Some people think that a great volume of 
business is a sign of success, and are 
tempted into risks which they ought not to 
take. A small, safe business is immeasur- 
ably preferable. 

7. Another very important requisite to 
success is persistence, tenacity in sticking 
to a business through the to-be expected 
period of discouragement. Too many 
persons embark in an enterprise, expend 
upon it a lot of intelligent thought, skill and 
industry, and then, when they see the 
returns are inadequate, throw it up or sell 
out at a sacrifice, forgetting that the efforts 
they have put into it are of the nature of 
capital, something essential to the enter- 
prise, and which will one day bring returns. 
What we call the good will of a business is 
simply the accummulation of all this brain 
and hand work not shown on the books, 
and often it is of even more value than the 
real money capital. Wherever an enter- 
prise is abandoned, of course, all that has 
been done to advertise it, make friends and 
build up a trade is thrown away. It is 
really the same thing as throwing away 
cash, because if nursed and persistently 
stuck to it would in time have a cash value. 
Many a man, after a long period of dis- 
couragement, provided he has been work- 
ing on correct lines, has suddenly found his 
business past the turning point, and as con- 
tinuously prosperous as before it was the re- 
verse. But this cannot be predicted upon 
a business improperly conducted, or where 
a false policy has been pursued. 

A very important thing to be considered 
and built up is the good-will of a good class 
of customers. Poor customers there is 
nothing to be gained in cultivating. As 
Capt. E. B. Ward used to say : "Cultivate 



the best customers and let your rivals have 
the others." It it is possible to establish 
such relations with one's customers that no 
persuasion or inducements will tempt them 
to leave you. Great care to furhish entirely 
satisfactory goods, prompt readiness to 
rectify any errors or make good any imper- 



fections, and zeal to see that no one is over- 
charged will always inspire a confidence 
which becomes a valuable asset in business. 
I have known merchants to consider only 
how they can swell their bills, forgetting 
that while they for the moment made a 
profit they endanger the permanent loss of 






The 
Safest 
Fire Arms 
in the 
.World 
rrfe of 



v> 



A 



Iver 

Johnson 

Make 



V 



Hardware Dealers 



SHOULD HANDLE 



Iver Johnson 
Revolvers 

They are recognized as standard, and 
are in great demand for Police, House or 
Pocket use. 

Their Accidental Discharge is Impossible. 

The Iver Johnson Single Guns — too — 
are good sellers on account of their safety 
Vfeatures, fine finish and general make-up. 

SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 



Branches— New York -99 Chambers St. 
Boston 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 361 Main St. 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



BOECKHi \ 



80 York St. 



The following lines carry the usual 
BOECKH GUARANTEE: Your 
money back if ie goods are not 
^ satisfactory." T ley are the best 
£* selling lines on t 



BRUSHES 

No matter what size or style 
you require, we have it or can 
make it for you. They are trade- 
winners. 



DISPLAY TABLES 

Write for our illustrated book- 
let ; it tells you all about them. 
Begin the century with good 
displays and prosperity will be 
yours. 



STEP LADDERS , 

Made of clear Norway pine, 
with pail rest. As light as is 
consistent with strength and 
durability. Sizes, 3 to 10 feet. 



CINDER SIFTERS 

Made in four styles, of the 
best quality of wire. Neatly 
and strongly put together. 



e market. 



SC EENS 



Stoned, oiled or varnished, in 
all standard sizes. Do not place 
your order without first getting 
our prices. 



AXE HANDLES 



Two doz. in 
selected hickory 
Five grades. 



a crate. Best 
Perfect finish. 



SAW-HORSES 

Folding, made of hardwood. 
Neat in appearance and strong. 



CHURNS 

Barrel, cradle and dash churns. 
Our ash dash churn is a winner 
and the price is right. 



CLOTHES LINES 

Sisal, Jute and Cotton lines in 
48, 60, 72 and 100 ft. lengths. 



Boeckh Bros. & Company 



TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



only 37-39 Front Street West, TorontO- 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 




SPRING SKATES. ££,. 

No. 5— Ordinary Quality $ .80 

7— Best, Quality 1.50 

10- " " Plated 1.90 

12— Concaved Blades 2.80 

All sizes to 12'i inches. 



LADIES' SKATES. 

No. 415— Ordinary Quality, Plated $1.40 

1422— Best Quality, Plated 2 30 

1424— " # " " Con. Runners 2.70 

447— Extyi' " " Light Runners 3.50 

All sizes, S'A to 10> 2 inches. 



HOCKEY SKATES. 

No. 510 K— Ordinary Quality, all sizes, 

7 to 12 in $ .60 

1531— Best Quality, all sizes, 8 to 12 in. 1.60 



No. 631— Best Quality, all sizes, 9 to 12 in. . $1.80 
632— " " Plated, all sizes, 

9 to 12 in 2.50 



No. 634— Best Quality, Plated, all sizes, 

9 to 11 M in., Concave Blades. $2.90 



No. 3697-Best Quality, Plated, all sizes, 

10 to 12 in $4.00 



Also the following lines of 

Genuine "Starr" Halifax Skates. 

List per pair. 

No. 90— "ACME" Spring, all sizes, 7 to 11 in ... $. 80 

25— " " " 8 to 12 in... 1.80 

7— " " " to WA in.. 3.00 

20— Hookey, all sizes 9 to WA in.. 1.60 

20 PS— " " 9 to 115* in.. 1.80 

25 PS— " " 9 to 12 in ... 2.40 



"Mic-Mac" Hockey Sticks. 




1900 
BRAND. 



"Mic-Mac" 
Yellow Birch, Toughest and Strongest, $8.00 doz. 

Our stock this season has been carefully selected, and the " Mic-Mac" 1900 is the 
BEST STICK on the market. 



The above are List Prices and subject to Liberal Trade Discount. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



PROMPT 
SHIPMENTS 



Graham Wire and Cut Nails are the Best. 



OUR PRICE6 
ARE RIGHT. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



the customer. I once contracted with a 
dealer for a large quantity of carpets ' ' made 
and laid." When the bills came in the 
thread, tacks and a lot of other things were 
charged extra. Of course it was my last 
transaction with that house. 

The golden rule of business, and the one 
which in the long run is most profitable, is 
to aim at entire reciprocity of interest be- 
tween buyer and seller. In other words, it 
should be as much the interest of the buyer 
to buy as it is of the seller to sell. Where 
both are equally advantaged, a basis of 
solid, profitable and permanent business is 
created, most valuable to all concerned. 

8. Lastly, it is important to everyone 
embarking in business to establish for him- 
self a bank credit. The concern which 
keeps no bank account may be set down as 
doing business in a very slouchy way. 
Perhaps the firm will tell you "we never 
have money enough on hand to make it 
worth while opening an account." One 
would not be far wrong in hazarding the re- 
ply that • ' you never will have. ' ' Although 
the amounts handled may be small, and 
the balance never great, it is still better to 
deposit in a bank all the receipts and pay 
at least all the larger bills by checks. Be- 
sides the element of safety in having a bank 
in charge of one's funds, there is a con- 
stant stimulus to increase the balance on 
hand; and a credit, which at any time may 
be valuable, is being built up. The con- 
cern which deposits regularly and never over- 
draws its account will imperceptibly come 
to have a standing at its bank which will 
do it good service when from any cause 
bank accommodation is needed. 

Then by all means establish confidential 
relations with your banker. Let him know, 
of course in confidence, the exact condition 
of your business affairs. His advice may 
be valuable to you, and unless absolutely 
rotten, he will go a long way to help a cus- 
tomer through a pinch. 



DID IT ON AN IVER JOHNSON. 

Harry Elkes, the Iver Johnson flyer, 
made another good win when he defeated 
Jimmie Michaels in a special motor-paced 
race of 15 miles at Madison Square Garden, 
December 22. Not only did he defeat 
Michaels, but he also lowered the Garden 
track record held by that rider from 
27.56 2-5 to 26.03 2 5- 



Wm. Rodden & Co., founders, Montreal, 
have assigned to A. W. Stevenson, and a 
meeting of creditors will be held on January 
10. The principal creditors are : Estate 
of Robert Hamilton, mortgage, $16,234.10; 
Crathern & Caverhill, $1,325 ; A. C. Leslie 
& Co., $1,650 ; S. E. L. Bricker, $8,000; 
George E. Douglas Trading Co., secured, 
$2,237. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

THE Canada Paint Co., Limited, are 
out with a handsome new "Century" 
catalogue, which has been printed in 
the firm's own premises and by their own 
staff of printers. Its neat style and high- 
class color-printing and decoration would 
lead one to think that it came forth from a 
specialty publishing house. It is strictly up 
to date, and can be relied upon as a most 
useful and handy price list. A number of 
new features are offered by this firm for 
1901, full particulars of which will be found 
in the catalogue. Any reader of Hard- 
ware and Metal who has not received 
this useful book by mail would do well to 
apply to the company's headquarters, 
Montreal. 

AN ENAMELLED WARE CATALOGUE. 

TheThos. Davidson Manufacturing Co., 
Limited, Montreal, Can., have undoubtedly 
reached a high standard of excellence in 




their enamelled and embossing department. 
Hardware and Metal has just received 
from them a calendar which has enamelled in 
six colors a face of an Indian chief in war 
dress. The design and coloring is so 
artistic, so true to life, that one wonders at 
the skill of the mechanical genius which 
has created the effect produced. The 
accompanying cut shows the design, but 
gives no idea of the brilliant effect that is 
produced by the contrasts and harmonies of 
the various striking colors used. 

interior decoration in metal. 
The hardware dealer who keep on hand 
literature which will help him to explain the 
advantages of any lines he wants to sell 
follows a wise custom. For this reason, a 
booklet which The Metallic Roofing Com- 
pany of Canada, Limited, Toronto, have 
just issued should be of considerable value 
to everyone in the trade. It is an ex- 
quisitely-printed booklet, dealing with the 



use of metallic ceilings and walls. It is in 
no wise a catalogue, but is rather an edu- 
cative pamphlet, gotten up with a view to 
convince readers that the artistic metal pro- 
ductions of this company are the proper 
material for interior decorations. And, from 
a perusal of the illustrations and reading 
matter of the booklet, it bids fair to convince 
many. Hardwaremen, therefore, should 
get one or more copies and interest prob- 
able customers in its contents. 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES. ASSIGNMENTS.COMPROMISES. 

MAX COHEN, general merchant, 
Hawkesbury, Ont., has assigned 
to G. S. Bowie. 
Alphonse Guimond, hardware dealer, 
2628 Notre Dame street, Montreal, has 
assigned. Real Angers has been appointed 
provisional guardian. The chief creditors 
are Frothingham & Workman, $1,026 ; L. 
H. Hebert, $648 ; Nap. Sarrazin. $690 ; 
Dame Nap. Mathieu, $500; Caverhill, 
Learmont & Co., $714 ; A. Ramsay &Son, 
$4oo;Jas.Robertson&Co ,$500. Total liabi- 
lities, $9,327. A meeting of the creditors 
has been called for January 10. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Brett & Leighton, hardware dealers, 
Orangeville, Ont.. have dissolved, M. J. 
Leighton retiring and S. Taylor being ad- 
mitted under the style of Brett & Taylor. 

John Lumsden & Co., manufacturers of 
tools, etc., Montreal, have dissolved, John 
Lumsden continuing. 

Jack & Robertson, importers of metals, etc. , 
Montreal, have dissolved, and Watson Jack 
has registered as prdprietor under the style 
of Watson Jack & Co. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

W. H. Hayes, blacksmith. Sussex, N.B., 
has sold out to H. H. Dry den. 

E. H. Heaps & Co., sawmillers, etc., 
Vancouver, have removed to Cedar Grove, 
B.C. 

C. W. Lurtey, machinst, Rossland, B.C., 
has sold ont to J. W. Pownall and J. L. 
Sanders. 

The Dominion Cordage and Manufac- 
turing Co., Limited, Peterboro', Ont., have 
been incorporated. 

Stewart T. Patterson, dealer in agricul- 
tural implements, Rodney, Ont., has sold 
out to W. Livingstone. 

A meeting has been held to organize The 
McFarlane-Neill Mfg. Co., Limited, manu- 
facturers of hames, etc., St. Mary's Ferry, 
N. B. 

Henry Yost, carriagemaker and black- 
smith, Tavistock, Ont., has sold out to 
KruspeBros., Sebringville, who have moved 
to Tavistock. 

FIRES. 

McFadyen & McQuade, tinsmiths, Col- 
lingwood, Ont., have been burned out. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 

Those having any items of news suitable for this column wi 1 
confer a favor by forwarding them to this office addressed 
to the Editor. 

SIR LOUIS DAVIES. Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries, in the Cana- 
dian Cabinet, has awarded to A. 
Wallace, Vancouver, a contract for a 
cruiser, 136 x 24 ft., for Pacific Coast 
cruising service, to cost between g6o,ooo 
and 570,000, and to The Albion Iron 
Works, Victoria, B.C., a contract for a 60 
x 11 -ft. cruiser, to be used at the mouth of 
Fraser River. The price of this cruiser is 
about 58,000. 

The Dominion Rock Drill and Foundry 
Co., Napanee, Ont., are asking exemption 
from all taxes, except for school purposes. 
The ratepayers of Napanee will vote on the 
matter January 7 . 

The McArthur Export Co., lumbermen, 
Quebec, have applied for a charter. 

The Owen Sound, Ont., Iron Works Co., 
Limited, are extending their premises. 

The North- West Gold Dredging Co., 
Lmrited, Ottawa, have obtained a charter. 

The Walkerville Wagon Co.. Limited, 
Walkerville, Ont., have been incorporated. 

The Hanover Portland Cement Co., 
Limited, Hanover, Ont. , have been incor- 
porated. 

A. H. Raymond, of Philadelphia, has 
taken the management of The Perth Flax 
and Cordage Co., Stratford, Ont. He is 
also taking a financial interest in the con- 
cern, and new machinery sufficient to 
double its capacity is being installed. 

During the holidays the McClary Manu- 
facturing Co. have had a large staff at 
work making numerous changes to their 
factory at London. Two new boilers of the 
latest pattern and very large capacity have 
been placed in position, and the plant 
changed so as to economize labor and to 
make the work as systematic as possible. 
They have also made large additions to 
warehouse and factory, which will increase 
their capacity in both these departments. 
Work was resumed on Wednesday. 



NEW RAILWAY FOR MANITOBA. 

In reply to a deputation, Premier Roblin 
of Manitoba promised to have a railway 
built from Brandon towards Virden, reach- 
ing the boundary of the Province, and to 
have it ready for operation in time to haul 
out next season's grain. He gave no dis- 
tinct pledge that the line would be built by 
the Government, although there was a 
possibility of the Government moving in 
that direction, neither did he give an 
answer as to what points would be touched 
by this railway. 



WANTED 

Wanted — An experienced advertising and cata- 
logue man by a Montreal Wholesale Hardware 
House. Must be well up in hardware. Apply, 
stating age, experience, and salary expected, to 

Box 38, Hardware and Metal 
(■) Merchant, Montreal. 



WELLAND CANAL. 
Tenders for Supplies for the year 1901. 

SEALED TENDERS for suppli s, addressed to the 
Superintending Engineer, Welland Canal, St. 
Catharines, wi.l be received until 20 o'clock on Wednesday, 
i6th January, 1901, for the supply and delivery of various 
ai tides of Timber, Hardware, Castings, Fuel, Paints, 
Oils, etc., for use on the Welland Canal and its branches 
for the year 1901. 

Specifications, forms of tender and other information 
can be obtained at the Superintending Engineer's Office, 
St. Catharines, on and after Monday, the 24th December, 
1900. 

The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. 

L. K. JONES, 

Secretary. 
Department of Railways and Canals, 

Ottawa, December 20th, 1900. (2) 



THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 



Manufacturers ot 
I, 2, 3 Bushel 




THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO. 



TRADE 



JSTobles 8f Hoare 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENC. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 




MARK 



Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



WIRE RODS I 



-+- 



Drawn to Decimal Sizes, Cut and Straightened, 
In Uniform Sizes. Prompt Shipment. 



Chalcraft Screw Co., Limited, Brantford, Ont. 




"DAISY" CHURN * 

Has tempered steel cased bicycle ball bearings, strongest, neat- 
est and most convenient frame. Only two bolts to adjust in 
setting up. Steel Bow Levers, suitable for either a standing or 
sitting posture. Has four wheels and adjustable feet to hold 
stand steady while churning When churn is locked to stand 
the bow can be used as handles to move it about on the front 
wheels as handy as a baby carriage. Open on both sides to 
centre, giving free space for pail. Made with wood or steel 
stands, with Cranks only, or Bow Levers as desired. 

Vollmar Perfect Washer 

Has a most enviable record. A 
perfection of its kind — will wash 
more clothes in less time, do it better 
and easier, with less wear and tear, 
than any other machine. 



THE. 



Wortman 4 Ward Mfg. Co., 




Limited 
LONDON, ONT 

Kastern Hranclj. 60 McGill Street, Montreal, Que 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January 4, 1901. 

HARDWARE. 

THE travellers are again on the road 
and orders are coming in. The 
volume of business being done is 
not large, as retailers are busy settling 
accounts and ending the year's business. 
The outlook, however, seems to be exceed- 
ingly bright. The sea of commerce is not 
disturbed by any strong wind of inflation or 
depression and with a fair pressure of steam 
good progress ought to be made. Movements 
from stocks are not large, but the making 
of spring contracts goes merrily on. Barb 
wire, lawn mowers, freezers, sprayers, 
rubber hose, poultry netting, green wire 
:loth are all demanding attention for spring 
delivery. Some fair amounts of nails have 
been moving this week at steady prices. 
Horseshoes are in light stock and still in fair 
request. Cordage is a little higher. Shelf 
joods are rather quiet. Wrenches have 
been put on a new price list. 
Barb Wire — From stock trade is very 




s'ow, but some orders are being placed for 
spring delivery at $3.20 f.o.b. Montreal 
in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — Business is con- 
fined to ordering for spring. We quote : 
No. 5, $4.25 ; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge 

$3-75 : No - 9. $3-°° ; No - IQ . #375 : 
No. 11, $3.85; No. 12, $3.15; No. 13, 
$3.25; No. 14, 84-25; No. 15, $4.75; 
No. 16, $5.00. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There are no new 
features to note. Business is slow at $2.80 
per 100 lb. 

Fine Steel Wire — There is nothing 
new to note, the discount remaining at 17 yi 
per cent, off the list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — The usual 
business is being done at last week's quota- 
tions. Discounts are 55 and z% per cent, 
on brass, and 50 and 7.% per cent, on cop- 
per. 

Fence Staples — This line is featureless. 
We quote : $3.25 for bright, and $3.75 for 
galvanized, per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Quite a number of small 
orders havejtome to hand this week. We 



quote: $2.85 for small lots and $2.75 for 
carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Gananoque, and St. John, N.B. 

Cut Nails — Cut nails are in moderate 
request. We quote as follows : $2. 35 for 
small and $2.25 for carlots; flour barrel 
nails, 25 per cent, discount; coopers' nails, 
30 per cent, discount. 

Horse Nails — Trade seems hardly so 
brisk as it was last week. The discounts 
are 50 percent, on Standard and 50 and 10 
per cent, on Acadia. 

Horseshoes — Stocks continue light 
and the demand brisk. We quote 
as follows : Iron shoes, light and me- 
dium pattern, No. 2 and larger, S3. 50; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 
2 and larger, S3. 75 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.00 ; X L steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, S3- 60 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.85 ; feather-weight, all sizes, $4.85; toe 
weight steel shoes, all sizes, $5. 95 f.o.b, 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. extra. 

Poultry Netting — Orders for spring 
delivery are being taken quite generally at 



OUR 



AVELLERS 



are now in CONFE 



Refrigera 



decide upon the most suitable makes of the following 
carry for the season of 1901 : 



Oil Cooking: Stoves 



endeavor to 
a box of 

ct 
onstruction 

Superb 
Finish 

and at a . . 

Most 

Reasonable 

Price. 




In this connection 
it will be our 
special aim to 
procure an article 

Much 
Superior 

to anything yet 
offered to the 
Canadian Trade. 



Not only will we strive to have the best quality, but 
also an exceptionally low price can be Guaranteed. 



DON'T place your orders for 1901 in these lines till you examine the samples and prices carried by our travellers. 

THE McCLARY MFG. CO. 

LONDON. TORONTO. MONTREAL. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



Why do you buy a com- 
mon galvanized iron — that 
is, if you do? Because your 
jobber happens to not have 
Apollo. 

Why do you think, he 
hasn't Apollo? 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York. 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

26 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

ji Wellington street, MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



sewbtmpe 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



50 per cent. off. The situation has been 
unsettled lately, and we hear that some 
firms have been selling at 50 and 5 per 
cent. off. 

Green Wire Cloth — The travellers 
report trade to be active on spring account 
at $1.50 per 100 sq. ft. 

Freezers — Ice cream freezers are be- 
ginning to move, but the number ordered is 
not large, as yet. 

Screws — The demand is only moderate 
this week at former quotations. Discounts 
are as follows : Flat head bright, 80 per 
cent, off list; round head bright, 75 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 75 percent.; round 
head brass, 67 '4 per cent. 

Wrenches — New prices have been put 
on wrenches not long since. Agricultural 
wrenches are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, 
off; "Acme," 50, 10 and 5 percent, off; 
Whitman Barnes knife-handle, 6 to 12 in., 
40 per cent, off; 15 in. up, 45 per cent. off. 

Bolts — A fair trade continues to be done 
in some lines, but the total amounts moving 
are not large. Discounts are : Carriage bolts, 
65 per cent. ; machine bolts, 65 per cent. ; 
coach screws, 75 per cent.; sleigh shoe 
bolts, 75 per cent.; bolt ends, 65 per cent.; 
plough bolts, 50 per cent.; square nuts, 
4^c. per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 4^c 
per lb. off list; tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; 
stove bolts, (>TYz percent. 

Cotterpins — ; There is no change to 
note. We quote as follows : 55 per cent, off 
English list, or, according to American list, 
%-\n. and under, 80 and 20 per cent., 
5-16-in., 80 and 10 percent., and y% in., 70 
and 10 per cent. off. 

Rivets — Continue quiet and unchanged. 
The discount on best iron rivets, section, car- 
riage, and wagon box, black rivets, tinned 
do., coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off; copper rivets, 35 
and 5 per cent, off; and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5 -lb. carton boxes, are quoted 
at 60 and 10 percent, off list. 

Cordage — The tone of the cordage 
market is firm. Manila is now quoted at 
I3^c. per lb. for 7-16 and larger; sisal is 
worth 9^c. per lb. for 7-16 and larger, and 
lathyarn 9c. per lb. 

Spades and Shovels — There is little 
being doing in this article just now. Dis- 
counts are 40 and 5 per cent. 

Tacks — There is no change to note. We 
quote : Carpet tacks, in dozens and bulk, 
blued, 80 and 5 per cent, discount ; tinned, 
80 and 10 per cent. ; cut tacks, blued, in 
dozens, 75 and 15 per cent, discount. 

Firebricks — Trade is dull at $18.50 to 
$26, as to brand. 

Cement — Sales from stock do not amount 
to much. We quote : German, $2.50 to 



IRON 



STEEL 



TIN PLATES Etc. 



Close prices for import 
to wholesale buyers. 



A. C. LESLIE A CO. 

MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

We have in stock 

PIG TIN 
ING-OT COPPER 
LAKE COPPER 
PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



We wish you all a Happy and Prosper= 
ous New Year. 

To start the new century well nothing could be more 
appropriate than a cabinet of our 

ELASTILITE VARNISH 




The above cuts represent a front and back view of show can. 



Manufactured only by- 



IS Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 



We have received large consignments of 




ass 



Both Single and Double 

via the following steamers, viz 

CEBRIANA, 

FITZCLARENCE, DALTONHEAD, 

CAMBRIAN KING, SYLVANIA, 

and from our large and complete stock can fill all orders 
promptly. 



$2.65 ; English, $2.40 to $2.50; Belgian, 
51.90 to 52.15 per bbl. 

METALS 

The metal market does not show as much 
strength as it did some time ago, but, on 
the whole, the situation is steady. Trade is 
quiet in most lines. 

Pig Iron — There seems to be no pre- 
dominant changing influence and the mar- 
ket appears steady. Summerlee is worth 
524 to #25, and Canadian pig $19 to $20. 

Bar Iron — Quite a fair amount of trading 
is being done at 51.65 to 51.70 per 100 lb. 

Black Sheets — This line is featureless 
at the present moment. The base price is 
52.85 for 8 to 16 gauge. 

Galvanized Iron — We hear that some 
import orders are being placed at very low 
prices. The travellers are making con- 
tracts for spring delivery. Out of stock 
there is not much moving. We quote : 
No. 28 Queen's Head, 54-65 to $485 ; 
Comet, No. 28,54-3° to $4-55. and Appolo, 
10^ oz., 54 65 to 54-85. 

Ingot Copper — A fair amount of busi- 
ness is being done at I7j£c. 

Ingot Tin — The foreign markets are un- 
settled. Locally there is little trading being 
done. Lamb and Flag is selling at 33 to 

34C 

Lead— The market continues steady at 
54-65- 



Lead Pipe — A fair amount of business is 
being done at 7c. for ordinary and 7J£c. 
for composition waste, with 15 per cent, 
off. 

Iron Pipe — A fair trade is being done. 
We quote as follows : Black pipe, '4 , 52.80 
per 100 ft.; ft, 52.80; #. 52.85; %, 53-°5: 
i-in., 54.35; i#.$5-95: i#.S7-io; 2-in., 
59.50. Galvanized, %, 54-Qo ; %, 55-4o; 
1 in., 57.35 ; 1%, 59-75: l %> $"-7o ; 2- 
in., 515-75- 

Tinplates — The market does not show 
much strength. We quote : Coke, 54-5°; 
charcoal, 54-75- 

Canada Plate — This article is not at- 
tracting much attention at the moment. 
Quotations are unchanged. We quote : 
52's, 52.85; 60' s, 53; 75's, 53-»o; full 
polished, 53.75, and galvanized, 54.60. 

Tool Steel— We quote: Black Diamond, 
8c; Jessop's 13c. 

Steel — We quote : Sleighshoe, 51-85; 
tire, 51.95 ; spring, 52.75 ; machinery, 
52.75 and toe-calk, 52.50. 

Terne Plates — A fair trade is still doing 
in terne plates at 58 25. 

Swedish Iron — Unchanged at 54-25. 

Coil Chain — There has been no change 
in local quotations. Some spring orders 
will likely be placed while the travellers are 
on their pesent trip. The tone of the 
market is firm. We quote as follows : 



No. 6, 11 j£c. ; No. 5, 10c; No. 4, gj^c; 
No. 3, 9c; X-inch, 7>£c. per lb.; 5-16, 
54.60; 5-16 exact, 55-io; ft, 54.20; 7-16, 
5400; ft, 53.75; 9-i6, 53-65; ft, 53-35; 
#.$3- 2 5; H.$3-2o; i-in., 53- 15- 
Sheet Zinc — Values are steady at 6 to 
6*c. 
Antimony — Unchanged, at 10c. 

GLASS. 
The market for glass is without any 
new feature. We quote as follows : 
First break, 52; second, 52.10 for 50 
feet ; first break, 100 feet, 53.80 ; 
second, 54 ; third, 54.50; fourth, 54.75; 
fifth, 55-25 ; sixth, 55-75. and seventh, 
56.25. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 
Owing to supplies coming in freely from 
Georgia aud South Carolina, turpentine has 
been reduced ic. per gallon. Putty has 
been advanced 5c. per 100 lb. In dry 
colors, such as vermilion, permanent greens 
and oxides, a capital business has been 
done since our last report. In Canadian 
oxides, especially, some good orders have 
been received for shipment into the United 
States. Locally, a very fair inquiry exists 
for all classes of painting material, and 
inquiries are coming from all parts of the 
Dominion. As to price and prospects for 
paris green the market is not as yet formed 
and chemicals are unsettled, no quotations 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



-2b~~ 




having as yet been available. Colors ground 
in oil and in japan have met with a fair 
measure of attention. White lead, as usual, 
at this time of year, is rather quiet, and 
quotations at the last meeting of the associa- 
tion were not changed. All lead products 
may be described as steady. Putty is mov- 
ing freely at the advance. We quote : 

A fair trade has been done this week, 
although orders were very scarce during the 
first few days. The feeling in linseed oil is 
a little stronger. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, $6.50; No. 1, $6.12^ ; No. 2, 
*S-75 I No. 3, $S-37%, and No. 4. $S> all 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 
or four months. 

Dry White Lead — #5.75 in casks; 
kegs, $6. 

Red Lead — Casks, $5.50; in kegs, 
SS-75- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6y£c; in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7%c. 

Putty — We quote : Bulk, in barrels, 
$2 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity, $2.15; 
bladders, in barrels, $2.20 ; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, $2.35; in tins, 
$2.45 to $2,75 ; in less than 100-lb. lots, 
$3 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 80c; boiled, 83c, 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic. less, 10 to 20-bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and 0>hawaat 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

Turpentine — Single bbls., 59c; 2 to 4 
bbls., 58c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — $1.25 to $1.45 per gal. 

Castor Oil— 8 % to 9^c. in wholesale 
lots, and %c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil— 47^ to 49c. 

Cod Oil— 32^ to 35c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
#2.75 to S4.50, as to brand ; coal tar, $3.25 
t0 53-75 I cotton waste, 4% to 5^c. for 
colored, and 6 to 7}4c. for white ; oakum, 
5/4 to 6^c, and cotton oakum, 10 to 11c. 

SCRAP METALS. 

There are no new features to notice this 
week. The demand seems rather quiet. 
Dealers are paying the following prices in 
the country : Heavy copper and wire, 
13 to i3j£c. per lb. ; light copper, 
12c; heavy brass, 12c; heavy yellow, 
Zyi to 9c; light brass, dy z to 
7c; lead, 2^ to 3c. per lb.; zinc, 2% to 
2^c. ; iron, No. 1 wrought, $13 to $14 per 
gross ton ; No. 1 cast, $13 to $14 ; stove 
plate, $8 to $9; light iron, No. 2, $4 a ton; 
malleable and steel, $4. 

PETROLEUM. 
The demand continues steadily brisk. We 
quote as follows: "Silver Star," 15 to 
16c. ; "Imperial Acme," \b% to I7^c. ; 
" S.C. Acme," 18 to 19c, and "Pratt's 
Astral," 19 to 20c. 

HIDES. 

The demand for hides continues slow, 
and there is little trading doing. We quote: 
Light hides, 8^c. for No. 1 ; 7>£c. 
for No. 2, and 6^c. for No. 3. Calfskins, 



Our Metallic 
Ceilings and Wall's^ 



are the ideal finish for all kinds of build 
ings, because they combine beauty an 
utility. 

We make an almost countless assort- 
ment of artistic designs — the plates fitting 
accurately, the joins imperceptible, and 
the pattern continuous in perfect precision 
throughout. 

Their sanitary superiority, fireproof protection, handsome effect, and 
moderate cost appeal to all progressive people. 

Catalogue and Price List at your service. 



METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited, •»»«£• Toronto. 



Wholesale Manufacturers. 



8c. for No. 1 and 6c. for No. 2. 
skins, 90c. 



Lamb- 



MONTREAL NOTES. 

Rope is about ic. per lb. higher. 

Turpentine is ic. per gal. lower. 

The price list of wrenches has been re- 
cast. 

Putty has been advanced in price 5 to 10c. 
per 100 lb. 

Mixed paints are firm and, in some cases, 
higher, being now quoted at $1.25 to $ 1.45. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 4, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

THE wholesale hardware trade is still 
enjoying its holidays' quiet feeling. 
The wholesale houses are still busy 
taking stock and the travellers remain in 
the warehouse lending their assistance to 
this task. On Monday next practically all 
the travellers will be again on the road and 
we may, therefore, look for an improvement 
in trade next week. The manufacturers 
are meeting this week in Toronto, but so far 
we hear of no change being made in any 
line appertaining to the iron trade. In 
fact, the only change worthy of note in any 
line is in putty, which is from 5 to 10c. per 
100 lb. dearer. In all staple lines, such as 
nails and fencing wire, the volume of busi- 
ness is small indeed, but, of course, nothing 
else could be expected at this season. The 
letter order trade is fair for this time of the 
year. 

Barb Wire — Nothing is being done in 
the way of prompt shipment, but a few 
orders are being booked for spring delivery. 
We still quote f.o.b. Cleveland at $2 .97 }4 



in less than carlots, and $2.85 for carlots. 
From stock, Toronto, $3. 10 per 100 lb. 

Galvanized Wire — Much the same 
remarks apply to this as to barb wire, the 
demand being only for spring shipment. 
We still quote No. 9 at $3. 10, Toronto. 
The base price f.o.b. Cleveland is still 
$2 72 y z per 100 lb. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There are a few 
orders being taken for oiled and annealed 
wire for spring shipment, but nothing is 
being done in shipment from stock. There 
is a little movement in hay-baling wire from 
stock. The base price is #2.80 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Business in this line is 
almost at a standstill. The nail manufac- 
turers are meeting in Toronto as we go to 
press, but so far no change in prices has 
been announced. We, therefore, still quote 
the base price at $2.85 per keg for less 
than carlots and $2.75 for carlots. 

Cut Nails — Dull and featureless with 
the base price unchanged at $2.35 per keg. 

Horseshoes — Very little doing, and 
prices are as before. We quote as follows 
f.o.b. Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, light, medium and heavy, $3.60 ; 
snow shoes, $3.85 ; light steel shoes, $3. 70; 
featherweight (all sizes), $4.95 ; iron shoes, 
No. 1 and smaller, light, medium and 
heavy (all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; 
light steel shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4- 95- 

Horse Nails — Much the same remark 
applies to these as to horseshoes. Discount, 
50 per cent. on standard oval head and 50 
and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Screws — Just a moderate trade is 
being done. Prices are as before. We 
quote wood screws as follows : Flat 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



head bright, 80 per cent, off the list; round 
head bright, 75 percent.; flat head brass, 
75 per cent.; round head brass, 67% per 
cent.; flat head bronze, 67 % per cent.; 
round head bronze, 62 j£ per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — These are quiet and 
unchanged. We quote : Carriage bolts (Nor- 
way), full square, 7opercent.; carriage bolts, 
fulls quare, 70 per cent. ; common carriage 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; coach screws, 
75 per cent.; sleighshoe bolts, 7.5 per cent.; 
blank bolts, 65 per cent. ; bolt ends, 65 per 
cent.; nuts, square, 4^c. off; nuts, hexagon, 
4Vc off; tire bolts, 67% per cent.; stove 
bolts, 67^ ; plough bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rivets and Burrs — These are also 
quiet and without change. Discount, 60 
and 10 per cent, on iron rivets; iron burrs, 
55 per cent.; copper rivets and burrs, 35 
and 5 per cent. 

Rope — Is dull and unchanged at last 
week's advance. Sisal, 9c. per lb. base, 
and manila 13c. Cotton rope is unchanged 
as follows: 3-16 in. and larger, i6^c; 5-32 
in.. 21 }4c, and y% in., 22 %c. per lb. 

Cutlery — There is practically nothing 
doing in this line as is to be expected 
after the holiday season. 

Building Paper — There is a little 
movement in this line and stocks are now 
fairly complete. Ready roofing, 3-ply, 
$1.65 per square ; ditto, 2 ply, $1.40 per 
square. Quotations are f. o. b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, London. 

Green Wire Cloth — Very little is being 
done at the moment in the way of booking 
for future delivery. We still quote $1.50 
per 100 sq. ft. 

Rules and Planes — The Stanley Rule 
and Level Co. have issued a new list of 
prices on the articles they manufacture. A 
new list of prices has been issued, but the 
discounts are unchanged. The new list of 
prices, compared with those which went 
into force a year ago, is as follows : 

BOXWOOD RULES. 

New list Old list 

per doz. per doz. 

No. 4 $1100 jjio 00 

No. 12 16 00 14 00 

No. 18 6 00 5 00 

No. 26 11 00 9 00 

No. 27 13 00 12 00 

No. 29 4 5° 3 5° 

No. 66 10 00 8 00 

No. 66 'A 10 00 8 00 

No. 67 6 00 5 00 

SIANI.KV PLANES. 

New list Old list 

each. each. 

No. 100 $ 3° $ 25 

No. 130 8S 80 

Cement— There is practically nothing 
doing. Prices are unaltered. We nomin- 
ally quote in barrel lots : Canadian Port- 
land, J2.80 to $3; Belgian, $2.75 to $3; 
English do., $3 ; Canadian hydraulic 



cements, $1.25 to 81.50; calcined plaster, 
$1.90 ; asbestos cement, $2.50 per bbl. 
METAL, S. 

This being the period of the year when 
most dealers are taking stock very little 
business is naturally being done in the 
metal trade. Although in the outside markets 
there have been some fluctuations in prices 
in some lines of metals, our figures are un- 
changed. 

Pig Iron — Some good orders have been 
placed by large users of pig iron in Canada 
recently for delivery during the next six 
months and prices rule steady. For small 
lots of pig iron the Ontario furnaces are 
quoting $18, but for quantities this figure is 
shaded. 

Bar Iron — The feeling in regard to bar 
iron is firm. A scarcity of scrap is reported, 
and it is asserted that the mills are selling 
bar iron close to the cost of production. The 
ruling base price is $ 1 . 70. 

Pig Tin — There has been a great deal of 
fluctuation in prices in the outside markets 
during the past week, but the general ten- 
dency is toward lower prices. Locally, 
there is very little being done, but prices 
are unchanged at 33 to 34c. per lb. 

Tinplates — The demand for these is 
light with quotations as before. 

Tinned Sheets — Business is almost at 
a standstill in this line. We still quote 28 
guage at 9 to gyic. per lb. 

Terne Plates — There is nothing doing 
in this line. 

Black Sheets — Like nearly all other 
metals very little is being done in black 
sheets. We quote $3.50 per 100 lb. 

Galvanized Sheets— The demand from 
stock has fallen off somewhat, but import 
orders are being booked with freedom. We 
quote English at $4.85 and American at 
$4.50 for ordinary quantities. 

Canada Plates — There has been a little 
more movement in this line. We quote : 
All dull, $315; half and half, $3.25; 
and all bright, $3 85 to $4.. 

Iron Pipe — The demand keeps up fairly 
well, but jobbers' prices are rather low com- 
pared with the condition of the market. 
We quote as follows : Black pipe # in., 
#3.00 ; y% in., $3 00 ; }4 in., $3.00 ; % 
in., $3.30; 1 in., $4 5°: 1 X in., J6.25 ; 
i^in., $7.75; 2 in., $10.40. Galvanized 
pipe is as follows: x / z in, $4.50; tf in., 
$5; 1 in., $7; \% in., #9.50; i'A in., 

$11.75; 2 in -> $ I 5-7S> 

Solder — A fairly good trade is being 
done. We quote half-and-half, 19 to 20c; 
refined, 19c. 

Pig Lead — The demand is fair, with 
prices unchanged at 4 V to 5c. 

Copper — There has been a small move- 
ment in ingot copper during the week, and 
trade is fair in sheet. We quote : Ingot, 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 




fCOVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.V. 

YANKEE SNAPS. 

Made in all styles and sizes. 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PR1E5T'5QL1PPER5 

B*HiftS --^^Lmrgert V»rieh,. 
BE** l-^Vvit ToUe ti Hand, Electric Power 

7ARETHE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep -Shearing Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB CATiXOOtTI TO 
• ■•rl«u Sbf.r.r Wf K . C«.. Nt.hm. «.H.T.«i 





NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door Closer, 
They work silently and effectually, and never get I 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 1 
ings throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



BURMAN & SONS', LIMITED cuWIrs 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
upplied to Her Majesty's War Oflice to clip the 
avalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers iu many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Russia's Stables and Field Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 
BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont 



Pullman Sash Balance Go 

Makers of the 

44 Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 

On aale all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



■rA 



1910200. ; bolt or bar, 23*4 to 25c; sheet, 
23 to 23>£c. 

Brass — Business continues quiet with the 
discount on rod and sheet unchanged at 1 5 
per cent. 

Zinc Spelter — The demand has been 
rather good during the week. We quote 6 
to 6#c. per lb. 

Sheet Zinc — Business appears to have 
fallen off a little during the week, it now 
being characterized as quiet. We quote 
casks at $6.75 to $7, and part casks at 
$7 to $7.50 per 100 lb. 

Antimony — Trade is quiet and prices 
unchanged. We quote 1 1 to 1 1 *4c. per lb. 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

There is not much doing. Travellers 
have been out since Wednesday, but find 
little demand. Some orders for linseed oil 
for spring delivery are reported. Prices 
are easy, a decline of 2c. being noted. 
Turpentine is also ic. lower, but since the 
reduction was made the market has 
strengthened, and the present quotations 
are not likely to be followed by lower ones. 
Putty has been advanced 5c. for bulk and 
10c. for bladders. It is firm at the new 
prices. The manufacturers of white lead, 
who met late last week, decided not to 
make any change. An advance was ex- 
pected by many. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.62^; No. 1, $6.25; No. 2. $5.87^; 
No. 3, $5.50; No. 4, #4 75; dry white lead 
in casks, $6. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., #5 to $5 25 ; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb.; #5.25 to $5.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 7 to 7%c 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 8 to 8j£c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.20; blad 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.35; bulk in bbls., 
$2 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 lb., 
$2.15; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $3. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, #1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 

in bbls. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, 51.20 to $1.30 per 
gal.; No. 1 quality, $1 per gal. 

Castor Oil— East India, in cases, 10 to 
io>£c. per lb. and io}i to no for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 80c; 



84,000 Daily Production. 
S Factories. 5 Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sale all 
over the World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70% of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 

BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. E stablished 1773 

Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 
or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 
Designs on application. 

Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies: 107 Cannon Street. London, E.C.— 128 Hope Street. Glasg< v — 
12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Paradise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address : "Glass, St. Helens." Telephone >n 

68 St Helens. 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 



of every description. 

Reliable Tools at low prices. 




A. SHAW & SON, 52 Rahere St., Goswell Rd„ London, E.C., Eng. The oldest house in the trade, 

lineal successors of the inventor and patentee, J. SHAW. 



boiled, 84c. ; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 79c. ; 
boiled, 83c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 57c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 56c, to all points in Ontario. 
For less quantities than barrels, 5c. per 
gallon extra will be added, and for 5-gallon 
packages, 50c, and 10 gallon packages, 
80c. will be charged. 

■ GLASS. 
There is a strong disposition in favor of 
an advance, but as yet no change has been 
made. There is practically nothing doing. 
We still quote first break locally : Star, 
in 50 foot boxes, $2.10, and 100-foot 
boxes, $4; doublediamond under 26 united 
inches, $6, Toronto, Hamilton and Lon. 
don ; terms 4 months or 3 per cent. 30 days. 
OLD MATERIAL. 

There is a fair delivery and a good de- 
mand. The feeling keeps steady. We quote 
jobbers' prices as follows : Agricultural 
scrap, 55c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 55c. 
per cwt. ; stove cast, 40c; No. 1 wrought 
55c. per 100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, io^c. ; heavy 
copper, izyic. ; coil wire scrap, 13c. ; 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10 to 
ioj^c. ; heavy red brass, io^c. ; scrap 
lead, 3c. ; zinc, 2j£c ; scrap rubber, 7c; 
good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c; clean 
dry bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 
SEEDS. 

Though there is practically nothing doing, 
prices are nominally steady at $6 for the 
best values of alsike, and $5. $0 to $6 for 
ordinary to the finest clover. 

PETROLEUM. 

A good movement continues. Prices 
keep firm as follows : Pratt's Astral, 16 j£ 
to 17c. in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; Ameri- 
can water white, 16)4 to 17c. in barrels ; 



Photogene, 16 to i6^c; Sarnia water 
white, 15 j£ to 16c. in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, 14^ to 15c. in barrels. 

COAL. 

There is a large movement, but dealers 
state that they still have difficulty in getting 
cars. Prices are unchanged. We quote 
anthracite on cars Buffalo and bridges : 
Grate, #4. 75 per gross ton and $4.24 per 
net ton ; egg, stove and nut, $5 per gross 
ton and $4.46 per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Putty is 5 to ioc. per 100 lb. higher. 

The Stanley Rule and Level Co., New 
Britain, Conn., has issued a new list of 
prices on the lines it manufactures. The 
discounts are unchanged, but the list is 
higher. 

The stove and furnace manufacturers 
held a meeting in Toronto on Wednesday, 
but made no change in prices. And no 
change is anticipated, at any rate, for some 
time to come. 



PAINT AND OIL AGENT WANTED. 

A large manufacturing firm in England 
who manufacture paints and varnishes, and 
export oil, turpentine, harness oil, petroleum 
jelly, cycle oil, etc., is anxious to secure a 
thoroughly good firm or agent in Canada 
who will take up its line of goods. Hard- 
ware and Metal will be pleased to put 
any reliable firm or individual in communi- 
cation with the manufacturers in question. 
For particulars address, Agent, care of 
Advertising Department, Hardware and 
Metal, Toronto. 



A petition in insolvency was filed 
December 15 by Locke & Hodder, general 
merchants, Twillin Gate, Newfoundland. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN OUR OWN. 



AMERICAN BARS IN ENGLAND. 

THERE is no diminution in the importa- 
tion of American steel bars for con- 
sumption by South Wales works- 
The imports up to November reached the 
enormous total of 41,000 tons, of which 
25,000 were landed at Newport for the large 
sheet works in operation in that town. It 
is now reported, on a trustworthy authority, 
that an American shipping firm has con- 
tracted to deliver 20,000 tons of American 
bars at Newport for distribution among the 
various sheet and tinplate works in South 
Wales. There is, as will readily be seen, 
no improvement in the state of the local 
trade, and Welsh steel manufacturers may 
well be, as our South Wales correspondent 
puts it, at their " wit's end." The growth 
of the new American connection has badly 
disorganized both the steel and tinplate 
trades. It is worse than useless, however, 
for Welsh makers to stand idly by witness- 
ing the disappearance of a valuable trade 
without making a real effort to retain it. — 
Hardwareman. 

NEW YORK ME1AL MARKET. 

The London metal market closed to-day 
at noon, but during the short business 
session the fluctuations in the price of pig 
tin were marked. At one time the market 
stood at .£122 5s., and again at ,£121, but 
at the close the quotation for spot was 
,£121 15s., or 17s. 6d. under Friday's clos- 
ing. The trading in spot tin was light and 
in futures moderate in the English market, 
but here there was scarcely anything done. 
There was no call at the New York Metal 
Exchange, and speculative interest seemed 
to be entirely withheld. At the close spot 
tin was nominally quoted at 27c. Total 
imports of tin for the month of December 
amounted to 3,311 tons, leaving 1,445 tons 
afloat. The deliveries for consumption 
during December aggregate 2,400 tons, 
while the stock in store and loading is 3.041 
tons. 

Copper — Continued firmness character- 
izes this market, although there was hardly 
a call for stock in any quantity to-day. 
Lake Superior is held at 17c, while for 
electrolytic and casting stock, \6%c. is 
quoted. In London this morning an 
advance of 2s. 6d. was recorded, the market 
closing firm. 

Pig Lead — There was virtually no mar- 
ket to-day, current wants of consumption 
being supplied and buyers deferring pur- 
chases for future needs until after the turn 
of the year. The close was dull at 4.37 j£c. 
for lots of 50 tons or over. 

Spelter — The market remained dull, 
with prices nominal and unchanged at 



4.15c. There was no change in St. Louis 
or London. 

Antimony — Regulus remains steady 
though quiet at 9 to \o%c, as to brand and 
quantity. 

Iron and Steel -The last day of the 
year witnesses little buying or selling, as 
both buyers and sellers are occupied with 
other concerns which, for the time being, 
are of greater consequence. To day was 
no exception to the general rule, and there 
was nothing new to be noted in any depart- 
ment. The record of the past two months, 
so far as the volume of business is con- 
cerned, was eminently satisfactory, and the 
trade is awaiting the opening of the new 
year and the dawning of a new century in 
the confident expectation of a continuance 
of the prosperous conditions of the immedi- 
ate past. — New York Journal of Commerce, 
December 31, 1900. 

PIG IRON IN ENGLAND. 
The pig iron makers in the country have, 
in the majority of cases, obtained, within 
the last two or three weeks, such a marked 
abatement in the prices of raw materials 
that they are in a considerably better posi- 
tion than they were previously. The reduc- 
tion in the price of coke has, generally 
speaking, been more considerable than the 
reduction in the price of pig iron. As a 
case in point, we may note the fact that in 
Cleveland warrants, as compared with 
this time last year, there is a fall of us. 
9^d. per ton, but the fall in the cost of 
coke delivered at works from the highest 
point reached during the year has, in 



some cases, been 6d. to is. per ton more 
even than that. The imports of iron ores 
having fallen, too, during the past 11 
months to the extent of something like 750,- 
000 tons, we are justified in anticipating 
that the reduction in the total output of 
pig iron for the year will be at least 300, - 
000 tons, and the fact that stocks are phe- 
nomenally low contributes to make the pig- 
iron situation a reasonably healthy one. 
The general expectation is that prices will 
fall somewhat lower still, but that this does 
not necessarily mean that pig iron will be in 
a worse position because the prices of raw 
material are likely to decline pari passu. 
The following is a statement of the public 
stocks of pig iron in tons : 

Decrease 

during 1900. 

Tons. 

173.936 



Tons. 

Connal's at Glasgow 71,603 

Connal's at Middlesbrough. 31,700 I 

Railway Stores, " . 11,000] 

Connal's at Middlesbrough, 

hematite 555 

Hematite, West Coast 22,863 



27.493 

8,948 
175.384 



— Iron and Coal Trades Review. 

NEW CAR AND MACHINE WORKS- 

The new shops which the Ottawa and 
New York Railway built in Ottawa in con- 
sideration of a bonus $75,000 have been 
started. 

The shops are located on Ann street, 
between King and Nicholas streats, and the 
main building is 125 ft. long. 60 ft. wide 
and two storeys in height. It is well 
equipped with machinery and tools neces- 
sary for the carrying on of the work. 
Adjoining is a blacksmith shop, 45 x 60 ft. 
in size, and a boiler house, 20 x 25 ft. 

A boiler of 100 horse-power, along with a 
main engine of 75 horse-power, furnishes 
power for the shops, which have been in 
operation for five or six days, and at 
present 15 men are employed making 
repairs to cars. 



ESTABLISHED 1874. 

HENDERSON & POTTS 

HALIFAX and HONTREAL. 

White Lead and Zinc Paints 
Colored Paints in Oil 

Anchor Liquid House Paints 

Anchor Floor and Roofing Paints 

Anchor Varnishes for All Purposes 
Lacquers, Japans and Dryers 

Anchor Carriage Gloss Paints 
Anchor Pure Colors in Oil 

Anchor Superfine Colors in Japan 
Dry Colors, Wall Tints and Putty 
Anchor Straw Hat Enamel 
Etc., Etc., Etc. 

Sole Agents In Canada for 1 

Brandram Bros. & Co., London, England, 

White Lead, Zinc and Colored Paints. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



A TRAVELLER'S ADVENTURES. 

HARDWARE AND METAL had the 
pleasure a few days ago of meeting 
Mr. F. W. Franks, a representa- 
tive of Aspinall's' Enamel, Limited, of 
London, England. Mr. Franks is making 
a tour of the world, and he is more than an 
usually interesting man to talk with because 
of the incidents, many of them exciting, in 
which he has been directly and indirectly 
concerned. 

It is about 15 months since he started out 
on his tour, which is chiefly a business one. 
During that time he has visited Gibraltar, 
Malta, Egypt, Ceylon, Straits Settlements, 
Dutch East Indies, Australia, New Zealand, 
Tasmania, the Philippine Islands, China 
and Japan. He is now in Canada and from 
here will go to New York and thence home. 

In New Zealand he suffered the incon- 
venience of being quarantined on account 
of the bubonic plague. But that was only a 
small item in the list of his adventures. On 
his way to the Philippine Islands on the ss. 
Futami Maru, he was shipwrecked on 
Mindoro Island, the steamer striking a coral 
reef during a typhoon. On this Island, 
which was'an uninhabited one, he lived for 
a week with 180 other persons, at the end 
of that time being fortunately taken off by a 
passing steamer, which the one boat they 
had saved from the wreck managed to 
intercept. 

On the day he arrived at Hong Kong, 
the edict of the Dowager Empress of China 
was posted up urging the massacre of 
Europeans and Christians, and, strange to 
say, the day he reached Shanghai a similar 
edict was posted up there. In the latter 
city, an alarm was raised one night to the 
effect that the Boxers were marching on the 
city, and Mr. Franks, armed with a revolver 
which one of the volunteers loaned him, 
joined the ranks of those called out to 
defend the city. It was, fortunately, only 
an alarm. 

Mr. Franks considers he has now only to 
be in a railway wreck to complete his list of 
adventures. 

The visit of Mr. Franks to Canada is 
chiefly with a view to establishing distribut- 
ing agencies in the chief commercial centres 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It is his 
first visit to Canada, and he is much sur- 
prised at the development which it has 
reached. 



AN EXPENSIVE ERROR. 

SOMEWHAT over a month ago the 
Canadian linseed oil market was dis- 
turbed and weakened by low quota- 
tions offered by a Montreal broker and 
merchant who was making contracts for 
February to August delivery at prices two 
to four cents below those of any other firm. 



At the time that these low prices were being 
scattered by telegraph over the country 
Hardware and Metal made bold to say 
that it was difficult to understand how any 
firm could offer goods at such rates, and 
hinted that there must be a mistake some- 
where. 

Our suspicions have been only too correct, 
for the merchant who was revelling in such 
low prices now finds that his English house 
used a revised code of which he had not 
heard, and that he read the quotation 100s. 
a ton too low. 

On the broker himself the misfortune en- 
tails a great loss, for he intends to fill all his 
contracts or pay damages. It has been 
prophesied in the trade that he would refuse 
to abide by his agreement, but we are glad 
to be able to say that he has no intention of 
ruining his reputation gained in 20 years of 
business experience by such a procedure. 
He will fill his contracts even at a loss of 
several thousand dollars unless his customj 



ICE TOOLS. 

To the ice harvester it is of the utmost 
impcrtance that he possesses the most 
per'ec: working tools it is possible to buy. 
None but the very best are economical to 
him. The cutting season is short, the 
weather is cold, the men are hurried, and 
an unnecessary delay on account of un- 
managable or imperfect tools is both aggra- 
vating and expensive. W. T. Wood's ice 
tools have a worldwide reputation, and 
Rice Lewis & Son, Limited, their Canadian 

DAIRYMAN'S ICE PLOW. 




Fork Ice Man. 



c 




Splitting Bars. 



;• 




Ice Hooks. 



see fit to return the written agreement. 
Some firms have already voluntarily returned 
the papers, sympathizing with him in his 
misfortune. Others have refused to accede 
to his request to be allowed to withdraw and 
are claiming damages or the goods. 



agents, will be pleased to quote prices 
to all interested. Below we illustrate a few 
of their most useful tools: 



John H. Birch, general merchant, etc., 
Dorchester Station, Ont., has been burned 
out; partially insured. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



GIVE US FRESH AIR. 

THAT portion of civilized humanity 
which lives in large cities, says The 
Chicago Chronicle, is awaiting the 
coming of a benefactor to whom it will 
erect statues and sing pseans of praise. This 
benefactor will be the man who shall devise 
a cheap and effective method of ventilating 
flats and office buildings. No such method 
has yet been devised. 

There is no ventilation of the class of 
buildings named. The unhappy tenant 
may choose between suffocation and pneu- 
monia. He can either keep his "windows 
down and stifle or he can raise them and 
creat a draft which shall be his undoing. 
He occupies a steam-heated box in which 
no provision has been made for fresh air. 
He breathes over and over again an atmos- 
phere charged with carbonic acid gas. He 
may pay $5 per month, or he may pay $500, 
but he will get no ventilation. 

The ordinaiy dwelling is better. It is 
usually heated by a furnace and that in- 
volves the introduction of fresh air into the 
house through the furnace flues. Usually, 
too, there is an open fire in the parlor or 
library or dining-room, and the open fire is 
an unsurpassed ventilator. Unless the 
householder be crazy enough to throw away 
his advantages and substitute steam heat 
for the fuinace and fireplace, the average 
dwelling is fairly well ventilated. 

But for the flat dweller and the tenant of 
the office building, there is no present hope. 
They are doomed to stifle or to shiver until 
some ingenious American — and it really 
doesn't seem as though he need be a marvel 
of ingenuity, either — shall devise a means 
of letting a little fresh air into steam-heated 
rooms without subjecting the tenants thereof 
to the peril of serious illness. 

Is there not somewhere in this broad land 
a budding Edison who shall solve the 
problem and make his name blessed to 
countless generations yet unborn ? 



NICKEL-PLATED LEAD PIPE. 

Purdy, Mansell & Co. have successfully 
made an experiment which is likely to be of 
practical value. They put a piece of lead 
pipe through nickel plating apparatus. It 
was doubted whether the plating would 
hold to the soft lead and retain the clear, 
bright appearance that the plated brass 
pipe presents. The result of the experi- 
ment, however, was so satisfactory that the 
nickel-plated lead pipe could not be dis- 



tinguished from plated brass pipe by the 
eye. The lead pipe retains its softness and 
pliability, but the plating is clear and firm. 
It has already been used in plumbing work 
by Purdy, Mansell & Co. 



WILL MAKE STEEL PLATES. 

On Saturday evening a meeting of the 
shareholders of The Dominion Iron and 
Steel Co., Limited, was held in Montreal, 
when the issue of $5,000,000 of preferred 
stock was ratified. A. J. Moxham, the 
general manager of the company, stated 
that the first iron furnace would be blown in 
during January and that many contracts for 
iron for European and American delivery 
had been secured. Work on the construction 
of the new steel rolling plant will be com- 
menced at once. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

Building permits" 4 have been issued in 
Toronto to John Ewing, for three two-storey 
and attic residences at 135, 137 and 137^ 
North Beaconsfield avenue, to cost $5,000, 
and to G. B. Cameron, for a detached brick 
residence on Macpherson avenue, to cost 
$2,800. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

Hanover, Ont., has offered The Knechtel 
Furniture Co. a bonus of $25,000 on condi- 
tion that they will replace their building, 
which was destroyed by fire, with a better 
one. It is thought that the offer will be 
accepted. 

Manager Abbott, of the Butte Hotel and 
concert hall, Phcenix, B.C., intends erect- 
ing, immediately in the rear of the hotel, an 
addition 60 x 70 ft. in size and two stoieys 
in height. The ground floor will be fitted 
up as a concert hall, and the upper storey 
will be used as rooms for the hotel. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

J. H. Midgley & Co., plumbers, Brandon, 
Man., have been succeeded by T. D. M. 
Osborne. 

Owing to a falling off in the pressure from 
the Kingsville, Ont., natural gas wells and 
a fear that the flow may become very small, 
many householders in Windsor, Ont., have 
installed coal stoves to take the place of gas 
heaters. The plumbers, tinsmiths, gas- 
fitters, coal dealers, etc., of Windsor, are 
consequently working night and day. 



HOW A TRAP TEST SHOULD BE 
CONDUCTED. 

THE following appeared in a recent 
issue of The Plumbers' Trade Jour- 
nal : "The recent heralded test of 
traps in one of our eastern cities leads one 
to suppose that, after all was said and done, 
there was very little to demonstrate the true 
worth of a trap. An abnormal test of the 
sort represented does not demonstrate the 
actual sanitary worth of a trap, the one 
great fact being evident that, in order to 
stand a test of the sort reported, a trap must 
have mechanical features that of a necessity 
make it really insanitary. 

' ' Built on lines for a perfect resistance of 
non-sy phonic action proves a mechanical 
construction internally that is a danger in 
itself, permitting the deposit of grease, etc., 
that in time accumulate and make it a most 
insanitary trap. 

"I have seen traps so constructed that are 
certainly a menace to the good health of 
those coming in contact with them in every- 
day usage. 

"A normal test of traps on scientific 
principles, quantities of water used must be 
commensurate with that ordinarily used by 
the average person in basin or bath ; with the 
fall natural the test on lines of good plumb- 
ing from say three or four-storey construc- 
tion, the fall from storey to storey gives the 
results of a good wholesome test. 

" To exert a syphon on a trap and let it 
go just to see what it will do is not a proper 
test. A test of the sort I write will demon- 
strate the true worth of a trap as a sanitary 
fixture ; obviously, the best trap is the one 
that has the least internal construction, 
compartments, etc. ; in fact, anything that 
is used for resistance is bad. A clear water- 
way made scientifically self-cleaning, pure 
and wholesome at all times under all con- 
ditions, those are the traps that count ; they 
are in the market and are being used every 
day ; have stood the test of time, and will 
always be recognized by the expert work- 
man and sanitary engineer as being the 
nearest perfection, the best for all. There 
are a number of this class I write of, all 
good, all safe." 



H. S. Skilson & Co., general merchants, 
Roland, Man., have been burned out. The 
loss is covered by insurance. 

D. O. Bourdeau, of D. O. Bourdeau & 
Fils. general merchants, Victoriaville, Que. , 
is dead. 



CANADIAN HARDWAR 




No. 219 Never 
Screw Drive 



SOLID STEEL FERRULE 



219.' This %/ /\jt*' 

e speciau es. ulflllH & HlMlNWAY uU., NtW YUKK. 



Fools never turn. Neither*noes No 
turns screws and not in the handle. 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 

ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 220% Board of Trade, MONTREAL. 

TACKS, CUT NAILS, WIRE NAILS, HORSE 

SHOES, HORSE NAILS, SPIKES, 

BOLTS, NUTS, ETC. 

SPECIALTIES — " C " Brand Horse Nails - 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

ii BRASSITE " GOODS — Gunn Castor Co , 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Manufacturers ot 

Heating 
Supplies 

Pipe Fittings and Headers. 
Large Manifolds made to Order. 
Steam Traps and Appliances, etc. 




The , . . 

Jas. Morrison Brass 

Mfg. CO., Limited 

— TORONTO. 



FIXING-UP TIME 

follows stocktaking and is the best t'me to put in 




BENNETT'S PATENT SHELF BOX 

and the 

KLONDIKE SAMPLE HOLDER. 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., Toronto. 

X.B.-Dpn't forget we make boxe3 to fit your pre- 
sent shelving. 






Hardwood CHARCOAL **&***>. 

WffUUU ALOUIIUL equalling Methylated Spirits as a solvent. 



Manufactured only by.. 



THE STANDARD CHEMICAL CO., Iimited 

'"»"•■{£;:!::£"■■ Gooderham Building, TORONTO 



DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BANK 



They are easily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by any one. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 



. Patented, July 11th, 1893. 






Cnnndlan Patent, June 14th. 1894. 


■pf-^^ - 


°AlF\ 


-.-—-- J n 


feT * 20 1 


4 ^Si^<^ 


-^i 


m a 


m 


IwilH 


WW, ^ 'Vry.i ^^• ir -,, f iowa ii 

' " S (°MPANY '--- .- - DUBU oU£ ' J 


\ '■■■.. ■ ■ i - 




EXTENDED 





Sold by 
Jobbers 
of . . . 

Hardware 
Tinware 

and 

Stoves. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 



LEADER CHURN 

New Century Improvements. 

FOUR DIFFERENT STYLES: 

A— S'eel Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
B— Wood Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
C— Steel Frame with Crank. 
D— Wood Frame with Crank. 

Styles A and B may be operated/rom a sitting 
or standing position. 




Steel Frames and Hoops beautifully ALUMINIZED. 

All LEADER CHURNSare equipped with BICYCLE BALL 
BEARINGS and PATENTED CREAM BREAKERS. 

stands are so constructed that they are particularly strong 
and rigid, and there is nothing to interfere with the 
placiDg of pail in the most convenient position for drain- 
ing off buttermilk. 

It Pays to Have the Best, None are BetterThan the Leader. 

THE — 

Dowswell Manufacturing Co. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents: W. L. Haldimand & Son, Montreal, Que. 



STANLEY RULE k LEVEL CO,, 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS 



SOLD BY ALL H ARDWAR E 
DEALERS. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE MAKING OF A RADIATOR. 

THE Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, 
Toronto, always displays good taste 
in its advertising schemes. Another 
evidence of this is a New Year's card, or, 
rather, folder, which it has just issued. The 
first and second pages on the inside have 
illustrations showing two stages in the 
manufacture of the Safford radiator. The 
one shows the start, where the metal is 
being poured from the furnace. This illus- 
tration is herewith reproduced. The other 
shows the finished radiator. The whole 



the 25, years .of its existence it had paid out 
no less than $274, 8 19 in benefits. -* 

The ' ' Parliament of Canada ' ' was 
responded to by Mayor Prefontaine, M.P. , 
and F. D. Monk, M.P.; that of the " Leg- 
islature" by Hon. E. J. Flynn, leader of 
the Opposition in the Quebec Legislature. 
T. W. Burgess, president of the White 
Mountain Commercial Travellers' Associa- 
tion, and T. W. Barnard, jr., of Boston, 
brought fraternal greetings. Good speeches, 
good songs and good comradeship united to 
make a most enjoyable evening. 




The Start in Making a Radiator. 



folder is nicely designed and printed, and 
The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, is to 
be congratulated. 



COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS DINE. 

THE twenty-eighth annual banquet of 
The Dominion Commercial Travellers' 
Association was held in the Place 
Viger Hotel, Montreal, on Saturday even- 
ing. There were about 200 guests present. 
The new president, T. L. Paton, occupied 
the chair. 

The dinner proved a choice repast, but 
was equalled in point of quality by the 
excellence of the speeches which followed. 
After the toast of "The Queen," Mr. Paton 
referred to the growth of the association, 
which had increased from 251 members in 
1875 to a membership of 3,485 in 1900. It 
now has an investment of 5174,000. During 



TORONTO TRAVELLERS' OFFICERS. 

At the annual meeting of the Toronto 
City Travellers' Association, on Monday 
evening, the following officers were elected : 

President — M. A. Muldrew, of Lumsden Bros. 

First Vice-President — W. Anderson, of T. A. 
Lytle & Co. 

Second Vice-President— W. A. Mitchell, of Tod- 
hunter, Mitchell & Co. 

Chaplain — D. J. Ferguson, of Fairies Milling Co. 

Guard— James Scott, of T. A. Lytle & Co. 

Marshal — T. Holman, of The Christie, Brown 
Co., Limited. 

Treasurer — J. Mortimer, of The Christie, Brown 
Co., Limited. 

Secretary — W. F. Daniels, of Lyman, Knox 
& Co. 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN 
PRODUCTS. 

The following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the High Commissioner's office, 
in London, England : 

1. A north of England firm who are already 
engaged in the importation of eggs, cheese and 
butter, etc., are open to buy further supplies from 
Canada, and desire to be placed in communication 
with some large exporters in the Dominion. 

2. The names of sound business firms in Canada 
who deal in mining materials are asked for by the 
manufacturers of steel wire screening for gold- 
mining. 

3. Two applications have been received for 

names of asbestos mine owners 
in Canada. 

4. The manufacturers of tin- 
ned, japanned, and enamelled 
hollow-ware, who have shipped 
several consignments of enamel- 
led ware to Canada, are anxious 
to push the business and will be 
glad to hear from Canadian 
houses interested in it. 

5. The names of manufactur- 
ers of the various kinds of wood 
pulp and oakum are asked for 
by a north of England firm. 

[The names of the firms 
making the above inquiries, 
can be obtained on applica- 
tion to the editor of Hard- 
ware and Metal. When 
asking for names, kindly 
give number of paragraph 
and date of issue.] 

Mr. Harrison Watson, 
curator of the Canadian 
Section of the Imperial 
Institute, London, England, 
is in receipt of the follow- 
ing inquiries : 

1. The proprietors of a patent 
water-feed filter and grease ex- 
tractor would like to hpar from 
Canadian firms prepared to in- 
troduce same in the Dominion. 

2. A Liverpool firm desires in- 
formation as to the production 
of corn oil in Canada and also 
the names of any manufacturers 
of the article. 

3. A Birmingham firm asks for names ot Cana- 
dian makers of dowels who can quote in good 
specification. 

4. A French syndicate interested in wines, 
brandy, chocolate, preserves, etc., would be pleased 
to hear from a Canadian firm who would act as 
their representatives. 

5. A South-African firm would like to secure the 
services of a reliable Canadian firm who could act 
as buying agent for timber and o'her lines in which 
they are interested. First-class rettrences required. 



D. C. Thiesen, general merchant, 
Rosendoff, Man., has assigned to C. H. 
Newton, and a meeting of his creditors has 
been held. 



MR. JEANDRON'S NEW POSITION. 

W. J. Jeandron, representing J. C. Mc- 
Carty & Co., manufacturers' agents, New 
York, for the past three years in Canada 
and Eastern States, leaves shortly to take 
up his residence in New York to act as 
American buyer for Rayer & Rangier Freres, 
hardware jobbers, Paris, France. 

Mr. E. W. McCarty succeeds him in 
Canadian territory. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



EMBARRASSMENT OR FAILURE? 

By Hugo Kanzler. 

IT seems to have become the custom of 
late to divide smashups into higher and 
lower classes, both of them having 
formerly been termed failures. But a 
marked distinction is now being made in the 
application of this term, depending largely 
upon the circumstances necessary to gloss 
over the true facts, or those not intended for 
publication. In the former case, the word 
"failure" is regarded as a harsh epithet, 
and the milder word "embarrassment" is 
substituted ; while, if a small merchant 
meets with reverses, his misfortune is un- 
feelingly denominated a " failure," and he 
Is not held in the same kind regard by the 
commercial community as in the other case. 
Of course, in order to justify the term 
' ' embarrassment ' ' and administer the 
necessary sedatives to the creditors, delays 
are resorted to that are a mere mockery to 
the business world, more particularly so if 
the "embarrassed" firm has enjoyed 
unlimited credit for a number of years ; and 
such artful pretexts are employed as " Books 
not posted," "Accounts to be investigated," 
"Expert bookkeepers to be employed," 
etc., in order to gain time to formulate plans 
while the storm is blowing over — to eventu- 
ally induce creditors to accept a settlement 
satisfactory to the friends of the debtor. 

The appointment of a receiver is unques- 
tionably a most favorable modus operandi, 
as only in case of unreasonable delay on 
his part can the machinery of the courts be 
put into operation; and while the courts are 
ready to have their officers act promptly in 
administering the affairs of the defunct 
firm, it is nevertheless, with great hesitancy 
that the same rigid rule is adopted as to the 
receiver as under the assignment law or 
bankruptcy. 

In the usual and ordinary course of busi- 
ness, the members of a firm look forward to 
the monthly trial balance on the first day of 
every month or shortly thereafter, and from 
this and the proper books kept by the con- 
fidential clerk a firm is well able to ascer- 
tain its true condition without having recourse 
to experts to do the work of commonsense 
bookkeepers. 

Every firm or corporation, large or small, 
should see to it that a trial balance is 
handed down shortly after the close of the 
previous month ; and it must now be 
regarded as a lax method of doing business 
if such statement is not rendered within at 
least ten days after the proper time. It 
seems incredible than any large mercantile 
concern at the present day should not know 
its true condition at least once every 30 
days, more particularly so when the omis- 
sion on the part of the small dealers to keep 
proper books is severely criticized in case 



of failure. And no substantial reason can 
be assigned why the same complaint ought 
not justly be made against the rich man's 
failure. 



SUBSTITUTION CAUSES SUSPICION. 

THE attempt by a dealer to sell his 
customer a substitute in place of the 
article the buyer calls for at once 
places that dealer under the ban of 
suspicion. The only reason why the buyer 
does not invariably realize the suspicious- 
ness of substitution and promptly resent it, 
is probably because in many cases the 
money transaction involved is so small that 
it does not suggest the motive for fraud. 
Suppose a jeweler advertises a diamond at 
$50. He places it in his window. A would- 
be buyer enters the store and asks for this 
particular diamond. But the jeweler says : 
" I can give you that diamond if you want, 
but here's another that's just as good as the 
one advertised." The buyer's suspicions 
would be aroused at once. He would insist 
on the stone in the window and he'd keep 
an eye on it to see it wasn't changed. But 
in the case of a 50c. transaction it is differ- 
ent. The buyer is offered as " just as 
good " as a widely - advertised article, 
although substitution is just as suspicious in 
a 50c. transaction as in one involving $50. 
Look at the question from another point 
of view. A sale of stock is advertised. 
There are horses with pedigrees and records 
to be sold. Farmer Brown attends the sale 
with the purpose of buying one of these 
good horses. But the seller says to him : 
" That horse you want is a good horse, of 
course, but I've got another here that is just 
as good which I'd like to sell you." 
" Has he just as good a pedigree ? " 
" Well, no, he hasn't any pedigree to 
speak of." 

" Has he any record ? " 

"Well, no, we never held a watch on 
him that I know of, but he's just as good as 
the horse you want." 

Would Farmer Brown buy the "just as 
good " horse ? The question answers 
itself. And yet, this same farmer will allow 
himself to be swindled time and again by 
accepting "just as good" articles in place 
of those called for. The article he called 
for has, so to speak, a pedigree and a 
record. It's a standard in the markets of 
the world. Yet, in place of this standard 
article, he will accept a substitute which 
nobody knows anything about — an untried, 
unproved article which has no record of 
value and no proof of origin. 

Let the buyer who is offered a substitute 
bear in mind that substiution is suspicious, 
and that a substitute always carries the ear- 
marks of a swindle. — Belleville Sun. 



NEW YEAR'S DAY 
NINETEEN HUNDRED ! ONE. 



572 William Street, 

Montreal. 
Dear Sirs ; 

II S we open our doors for business on this kirst day of 
ihe new century, we feel it more than usually fitting 
to write a word of thanks to our constituents over the 
Dominion and abroad, and to express our good wishes for 
your continued well-being and success. 

lllE have tried to supply just what you wanted, and in 
" the most convenient form for sale and use. We have 
also recommended to you from time to time such additional 
features as our investigations suggested, and we have the 
satisfaction of knowing that these have been appreciated 
by you and profitable to you. 

AL'R new Catalogue, "Century Edition," mailed to 
you to-day, is fresh from our own press, and is revised 
to date. You will find it to contain several new features 
to which we will call your attention more in detail from 
time to time 

'T'HE following call for special notice : 

1. Empire Permanent Red— THE NEW- 
EST IN BRIGHT REDS— improves by exposure. 
Specially adapted for store fronts, wagons, implements, 
etc. This Red is offered for sale in paste or liquid form, 
and is used to lend permanence to our prepared Coach 
and Wagon Colors. 

2. Decorative and Permanent Water 
Paints. — These are really Chemical Paints. We 
call them "Water Paints," because water is used to dissolve 
them for use. Their characteristic feature is that, after 
application, they become hard and fast. The illustrated 
cards will show the beauty of these goods, both for interior 
decoration and exterior wear. 

3. Painters' Perfect White Lead, an 

entirely new combination, which will give a whiter surface, 
last longer, and cover more than Pure Lead. It has already 
been tested by leading painters, who say that it does all 
we claim for it. 

4. Shellac Sorfacer— a perfect line— a time 
and money saver— fills and varnishes by one application- 
rubs freely to a perfect smoothness. 

These are some of the additions ; and all the well- 
known staple line-- continue to receive our scrupulous care. 

■"VURING 1903 we ended a new Dye House, for the 
manufacture of Greens, Chromes, Blues, Scarlets 
Maroons, Vermilions, etc. This new factory gives us 
three times the capacity of our former Dry Color plant, 
with some saving in cost of manufacture. 

■ N the same year we set up an important addition to our 
tankage in Toronto for Fine Varnishes, with the 
newest appliances for making and handling our growing 
business in these first-grade good*. 

{CATALOGUE PRICES are revised to date, and are as 
low as the cost of materials admits of. All other 
quotations are withdrawn. 

THE year tqoo his been the largest in our turnover o f 
Mixed Paints, Coach Colors, and general lines of Pre- 
pared Paints and Stains. The outlook for business in 
1901 is certainly bright, and the New Year finds us better 
equipped than ever to furnish promptly our ever-widening 
range of manufactures, and to give the best value afforded 
by a large turnover and the most approved appliances. 



■JELYING on your continued support of the various 
departments of our operations, we are, 

Yours truly, 

THE CANADA PAINT COMPANY, 

Limited. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



n iiinimm 



I.IUHIIIIIIIIHII 



A CORNER FOR CLERKS. 



I HUHM WWWfWffWfWrP WHII III IM III HI IIII I I II m WWWffW I II MI I M I I I M II HM I 



^^m>> 



ONE WAY TO KEEP TRACK OF A 
CLERK 

JOHN BROWN, of Brownville. has the 
best store in that thrifty village. He 
has been bothered about to death by 
his clerks. There hasn't been anything 
they haven't done and won't do again if 
they have a chance. Their leading idea in 
life is to get ahead of him in some way and 
so far they have succeeded. For a long 
time he satisfied himself by discharging 
them when they proved not to his liking. 
He soon learned that he was teaching a 

COMMERCIAL KINDERGARTEN 

and that other storekeepers were ready to 
take his pupils by the time he was ready to 
graduate them. He found that his old idea 
of taking raw hands and moulding them 
into his pet forms, while it did carry out the 
idea of "clay in the hands of the potter," 
did as surely carry out the kindergarten 
thought, and of that he had had more than 
enough. 

He made up his mind to 

CHANGE HIS PLAN. 

For some years now his showcase had 
furnished his youthful helpers shirt studs 
and sleeve buttons. His neckties went the 
same way. He supplied at less than cost 
the collars and cuffs which none of them 
had when they came to him, and while he 
had been willing to do this and so help the 
boys along in the world — at all events to 
get started in it — he began to find that it 
was only so much patience and generosity 
thrown away, and he made up his mind to 
have no more of it. 

He noticed that the two clerks he now 
employed were pretty well fixed so far as 
goods were concerned which his stock could 
furnish, and he noticed, too, that both were 
showing those unmistakable signs which 
mean 

AN EARLY GOOD BYE. 

He sat down and made a little calculation 
— his books furnished him the needed data 

and he found it would be money in his 

pocket to raise the boys' wages and save 
himself the trouble of breaking in another 
pair of clerks and the expense of supplying 
them with the usual outfit. 

So far as he could judge, the trouble 
seemed to be in the fact that the boys began 
by being out nights and getting into the 
kind of mischief which ends in making 
them uneasy and discontented and good for 
nothing. Every case he could think of 
was traced directly or indirectly to that, and 



the problem, so far as be understood it, 
was how to prevent the young fellows from 
being up and out at night long after the 
time when they ought to be in bed. 

To add to the difficulty, Brownville was 
at that stage of its existence when, like the 
meeting of the waters, it was neither rivulet 
nor river. 

A BIG. CLUMSY GAWK 

of a place, it had spread itself over a large 
territory and had a frame like a giant, 
which the years in time might fill up, but 
there were no strong inducements for the 
boys to stay and grow up with it, and, the 
minute they were plumed for their flight, off 
to the city they went, and the Brownville 
which knew them once knew them no more 
forever. Like most places, as it grew it 
fought vigorously against the evils which 
attack the growing town. The saloon came 
and stayed. There were some billiard 
tables set up, and they thrived. 

CARDS BEGAN TO BE PLAYED, 

and almost before the people knew it the 
young folks began to be fast. The Sunday- 
school began to grow thin, and nobody but 
women went to church. In a word, while 
the town could not be said to be going down 
at the heel, it did seem to be a bad place 
for a boy who was inclined to fear being 
called a • ' wayback ' ' or, what was far 
worse, " not up to date." 

Mrs. Brown was in every sense of the 
word a helpmeet. She had no longings 
which took her away from her husband 
and his calling, and, while it had been 
years since she had given up her place 
behind the counter, she never cared to look 
beyond the horizon which shut in the 
Brownville store. When, therefore, the 
question was asked if she couldn't take the 
boys into the house, just as she did years 
ago, and she had been told the reason, like 
the devoted wife she was there was but one 
answer to be thought of and that was given 
promptly and heartily, and the childless 
woman made up her mind 

TO TAKE THE BOYS 

in and do for them and love them as if they 
were her own flesh and blood. 

That night after closing the storekeeper 
had the boys stay for a while for a talk. 
" I've made up my mind," he began, "to 
raise your wages, boys. You've been doing 
good work and you've been faithful enough 
to please me, and, while I shan't give you 
much more, it's something, and it'll let you 



know anyway that I want to keep you. 
There are two conditions that I want to 
make and insist on if I raise your wages — 
one is that you live with me, and the other 
is that you are 

AT HOME NIGHTS 

by 9 o'clock ; unless I know where you 
are and what you are doing. I'll give you 
good board and each of you shall have a 
good room ; but I want you to be in at 9 
o'clock and stay there. Think it over and 
tell me your decision to morrow. I'll raise 
each of you 10 per cent. Good night." 

The boys left the store on air and came 
back the next morning in the same frame 
of mind. Mrs. Brown came down during 
the morning to report that the rooms were 
ready and that afternoon saw the transfer of 
bag and baggage. 

EVERYTHING WAS DONE 

for the young men that could be thought of 
or asked for and Brown himself was forced 
to admit that he had hit on the only thing 
that could ever have worked with those 
fellows. They were honest to a dot. They 
were industrious to a fault. They meant 
well from first to last, and all they needed 
was just that little bit of restraint which 
John Brown had wit enough to insist upon ; 
and on that and on every night, after the 
town clock struck nine and he knew both 
boys were in, he 

LOCKED THE ONLY DOOR 

they could get out of and put the key 
under his pillow ; and every night Susan 
Brown heard him say to himself with in- 
finite satisfaction, " There, darn ye ! 
With the windows fastened on the outside, 
and the only key under my pillow, you can 
skin out and carouse all night if you can, 
and I'll never say a word !" 

It was a good while before the boys found 
out that they were locked in from nine 
o'clock until morning. The first thought 
was rebellion ; but when sober sense came 
to the front and they saw what an advan- 
tage the rest and the home had been to 
them they kept the matter to themselves, 
glad that "Uncle John," as they learned 
to call the storekeeper, had marked out the 
way and compelled them to walk in it ; 
while Brown himself, to this day, affirms 
that ' ' the only way to get along with clerks 
is to put 'em under lock and key and keep 
'em there !" — Richard Malcolm Strong, in 
Michigan Tradesman. 



Campbell & Cahill, dealers in agricultural 
implements, Rodney and West Lome, Ont., 
whose premises in the latter place were 
burned the other day, have dissolved. Mr. 
Campbell continues in Rodney and Mr. 
Cahill in West Lome. 



CANADIAN HARDWA 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 






HJKS&C 

UNION JACK 

CUTLERY 

We make a specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL. 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 

COOPERS 

ONE-PIECE ELBOWS. 

Scheipe's Patent Stove Pipe 

Best In the world. 




Ask for 

COOPER'S 

PATENT ELBOW. 

Price Guaranteed. 



E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 



Sole Owners. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



" JARDINE " 
HAND DRILLS 

Five different sizes to suit 
all requirements. It pays 
to sell the best tools. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



■*wwwv*vw 








PERFECTION VENTILATOR 



New, Simple, Ornamental, Effective 
and Storm Proof. The REAL THING 
to produce perfect ventilation. 

WRITE FOE PRICES TO 

BER6ER BROS. CO. 

231-237 Arch St., 

PHILADELPHIA 



Patented Fob. 28, 1899. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co. sh elburne « ont - 



The Latest and Best 

H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single 

Model 
1900. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 




Richardson 

er, Mass., U. 

Descriptive Catalogue 



quest. 



STEVENS IDEAL, NO. 44 



Stevens Ideal NS44- 




This is as reliable and 
accurate a rifle as can be 
constructed. Placed at a 
moderate price to meet the 
demand for such a rifle. It 
is recommended without 
qualification and fully guar- 
anteed. Made in the following styles : 

.22 Long-Rifle R. F., 25 Stevens R. F., and .32 Long R. F. "Standard length of barrel for rim-fire 
cartridges, 24 inches. Weight 7 K pounds. 

.25-20 Stevens C. F., .32-40 C. F., .38-55 C. F., and .44-40 (.44 W. C. F ) Standard length of barrel 
forcenter-fire cartridges, 26 inches. Weight, 7K pounds. 

Half-octagon barrel, oiled walnut stock and fore-arm, rifle butt, case-hardened receiver, sporting rear 
and Rocky Mountain front sight. 

Price, with standard length of barrel, $13.00. 

Can be obtained of any of the leading jobbers in Canada at liberal discount from this price. 

Send for complete catalogue of our full line of Rifles, Pistols and Machinists' Tools. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co,, P. 0, Box 217, CMcopee Falls, Mass., D S.A, 

HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Hand Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, white and colored, Tennis and Fly Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twines. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE SPECIALTIES. 

THE Smith & Hemehway Co., one of 
the youngest and most enterprising 
houses in their line of business, here- 
in illustrate a few of theirjnew specialties: 



this line that Hardware and Metal has 
ever had the pleasure of inspecting. 



LAKE OF THE WOODS GOLD FIELD. 

The Central Canada Chamber of Mines, 
Winnipeg, are sending out a pamphlet 



N- 



The No. 219 screwdriver Qnade 
a new process from a cold draVn mat 
They warrant it to be perfect ajra it wil 
turn, bend or break in driving screws 
handle is made from hardwoqd)S(nd 
so that it fits the palm of the 
insuring a perfect grip. 




show? 
mineral de 
district, Ont, 
an exc 
of the 
statistics 




otable development of the 

ts in the Lake of the Woods 

The pamphlet contains 

showing the location 

mines in the district ; 

ng the output of ore and 



gold in the region during 1899, the output 




The No. 149 Eureka skate-sha 
one of the newest automatic skat 
eners on the market. The beauty oi 
is that it is automatic in adjustment, 
will sharpen, with equal ease, either a 
or a convex skate blade. It is beaut 
nickel-plated, and small enough to 
carried in the vest pocket. 



Canada from 1887 

old in the different 

: 1890. and the 

er in the British 

98. There is also a 

s of Ontario and 

vinces containing 

ds.and the results 



The No. 191, Waldorf-Astoria can opener 
is a new departure in the can-opener line, 
being made from one " solid piece of 
steel " with a centre cut, which insures per- 
fect gripping on the can. These can-openers 
are beautifully nickel -plated, and mounted 
on display cards to be placed on the 
counter. 

In addition to the specialties herein illus- 
trated, the Smith & Hemenway Co. are 
one of the largest manufacturers of this line 
of goods in the United States. They also 
manufacture a full line of vises, from 
amateur to the largest machine vise, and 
market the entire product of nippers and 
plyers of the Utica Drop Forge and Tool 
Company. 

They state to us that they do nat publish 
a catalogue, but get out what they call the 
"Green Book of Hardware Specialties," 
which is one of the most unique things in 



of 1 24 assay tests. As the purpose of this 
bureau is to disseminate reliable informa- 
tion and statistics through the medium of 
the press throughout the world, and as 
these essays are published under affidavit 
this pamphlet of the Central Canada 
Chamber of Mines should be of much value, 
especially to those immediately interested 
in mining affairs. 



NEW CENTURY GREETINGS. 

Upon another page will be found the new 
century greeting of that enterprising go- 
ahead company, the Canada Paint Com- 
pany, of Montreal and Toronto. They are 
out for nineteen hundred and one, as the 
circular indicates, with a number of new 
features which the hardware trade will do 
well to study. This company have found it 
necessary to enlarge their manufacturing 
facilities very largely and energetic firms 



throughout Canada will, as heretofore, un- 
doubtedly find it to their advantage to con- 
tinue to push the manufactures of the Canada 
Paint Company. 



CARLOADS OF MOLTEN IRON. 

THE construction of a new bridge across 
the Monongahela, to be opened for 
service within the next few days, 
directs attention afresh to a striking feature 
of modern metallurgy. The usual way to 
make steel is to melt up cold pig iron, to 
which other materials are added, and then 
purify the mixture by burning out certain 
undesirable elements. Pig iron, however, 
is itself the product of a previous heating 
process, in which the ore is melted with 
carbonate of lime to remove the oxygen. 
It occurred to some ingenious Yankee a few 
years ago that, if the product of the blast 
furnace could be converted into steel before 
it had cooled sensibly, a great economy in 
fuel would be secured. 

The new bridge just mentioned has been 
built for the Carnegie Company, and will 
be used to convey molten iron from the 
Carrie furnaces to the Homestead Steel 
Works, nearly a mile off. At the present 
time, Homestead obtains molten metal from 
Duquesne, about four and one-half miles 
away ! The new route has been laid out 
so as to save time and distance, and, 
possibly, caloric, too. There has been for 
some time one ' ' hot metal ' ' bridge across 
the Monongahela, controlled by the Car- 
negie Company, and, besides the new one 
about to be opened, a third is in process 
of erection for the Jones & McLaughlin 
interest. It will thus be perceived that the 
practice has proved so successful that it is 
being rapidly extended. 

One gets a vivid idea of this remarkable 
procedure when he reads about the precau- 
tions taken in the construction of the new 
bridge to prevent harm in case any of the 
melted metal leaks or slops over while in 
transit from the iron furnace to the steel 
works. The spaces between the ties are to 
be filled with sand so that no iron may fall 
to the decks of passing steamers. The ties 
will be of wood, but are to be protected by 
a covering of sand. On either side of the 
track their will be raised a screen of heavy 
metal plates, faced with firebrick and 
reaching to a height of four feet. An 
extension of thinner plates will bring the 
screen up six feet farther. The cars are 
ladle-shaped, and the molten metal runs 
directly into them when the furnaces are 
tapped. A locomotive then draws the train 
to the steel works at a moderate pace. The 
glowing freight, says The New York Tribune, 
is still in a fluid condition when it reaches 
the mixers there. If it were not, the cars 
would be ruined. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



a 



MIDLAND 



55 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents: 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




We Manufacture^^ 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock <& Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CUHHE^T JVIABKET QUOTATIONS. 



Jaauary 4,1901. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 

1 west figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desre 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 33 34 
Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L. 8., equal to Bradley. Per box 

EC, usual sizes $7 00 

I.X., " 8 50 

I.X.X., " 1000 

Famous— 

1.0 7 50 

IX 8 50 

I.X.X 9 50 

R wen & Vulture Grades— 

I.C., usual sizes 5 00 

I.X., " 6 00 

I.X.X. " 7 0) 

I.XXX., " 8 00 

D.O.,12%xl7 4 75 

D.X 5 50 

D.X.X 7 50 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel — 

I.C., usual sizes 4 ?0 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 SO 

20x28 8 75 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.O., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 75 

I.X., Terne Tin 10 75 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X., 14x56, 50sheetbxs ) 

" 14x60 " I 07 07% 

•' 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08% 

" 26 " 08% 09 

• 28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs .... 165 170 

Refined " " 2 15 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 05 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 10 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base .... 2 00 

Tire Steel 2 00 

Machinery iron tinish 2 05 

Cast Steel, per lb 00 00 

ToeOalkSteel 2 31 

T. Firth & Cos special cast steel, per lb. 13 

Jesiop's Tool Steel 13 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-inch 21V, 

2 " 13% 

2% " 16 

3 " 017% 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

% iiob 2 25 

3-16inch 2 2i 

*& iioh and thicker 2 25 

Black Sheets. 

18 gauge sin 

20 gauge 3 10 

22to24 " 3 20 

26 " 3 31 

28 " 3 40 

Canada Plates. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 15 

Half polished 3 25 

\U bright 3 85 4 00 



Iron Pipe. 

Black pipe— 

U inch 3 00 

% " 3 00 

% " 3 CO 

\ " 331 

1 " 4 50 

l'/i " 6 fa 

1'/, " 7 75 

2 " 10 4J 

2%-6 inch, iliscour.t 60 p c. 

Galvanized pipe— 

V, iDCh 4 50 

% " 5 00 

1 " 7 no 

1'4 " 9 50 

i% " 11 <5 

2 " 15 75 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 

G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 

16gauge .... 4 5 4 10 

18 to 24 gauge 4 35 4 20 4 35 4 35 

26 " 4 6) 4 45 4 35 4 60 

28 ' ' 4 83 * 70 4 E0 4 85 

gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16in., per 1001b 

Vi " 8 0) 8 50 

5-16 " " 5 35 5 

% " " 4 35 4 85 

7-16 ' " 4 15 4 65 

% " " 4 35 4 50 

" % " " 3 85 4 35 

% •• '• 3 81 4 00 

Halter .kennel and post chains, 40 and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 25 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis 

count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B. S., ton lots 19 20 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cu lengths round, Vi to % in. 23% 25 
' ' round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23% 25 
Sheet. 
Untinned ,14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., 14x48 and 14x60 23 23Vi 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz, irregular sizes 23 23Vi 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4t6ft.25 to301bs. ea., per lb 25Vi 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24% 

. " 50-lb. and above, " .... 23% 
Boiler and T.K. Pitts . 

PI vin Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, perlb 32 

Brass. 
Rod »ud Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge , 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2i 4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zine Spelter 

Foreign, perlb C6 06% 

Domestic '* 

Zinc Sheet. 

5cwt. casks 6 75 7 00 

Partcasks 7 CO 7 50 

Lead . 

I nported Pig, perlb n 04 3 4 05 

Rar.llb 005% 05V 

Sheets. 2% lbs. sq. ft., by r o 1 ' .... 06Vi 
Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs.,' .... 06 



Note.— Cut sheets Vi cent per lb. extra 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net pric, waste pipe 
?-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 
Shot. 
Common, $6.50 per liO lb. ; chilled, $7. CO 
per 100 lb. ; buck, se al and bal , $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% pc ' PriceB are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized on 
Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on mtdium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Perlb. Per It. 

Bar half-and-half 19 20 

Refined 19 

Wiping 18 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 

quantity. The prices of other qualities o. 

solder in the market indicated by private 

brands vary according to composition . 

Antimony . 

Cookson's, perlb Oil Oily, 

White Lead . Percwt 

Pure 6 62% 

No. 1 do 6 25 

No. 2 do 5 87Vi 

No. 3 do 5 to 

No. 4 do 5 1!% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 12% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 87% 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 5601b. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 0(9 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 6% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks , 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 50 

No . 1 , kegs 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In Vi, Vi &nd 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 120 

Second qualities, per gallon 100 

Barn (in bbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 145 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 1 20 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality . 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

FrenchlmperialGreen 019 

Colors, Dry. 
TellowOchre(J.C.)bbls.... 135 140 
Yellow Ochre (J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), percwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt .. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, per cwt 175 2 00 

Surier Magnetio Oxides. 93 D o. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" TTmber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure o 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Ocbre 03% 



Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb 

boxes, per Hi 

r/ire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb. .. 
Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb .. 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 

English Vermillion 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45,1b. ., 

Whiting, per 100 lb 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying , per lb 

100-lb.lots, do. per lb 

Putty. 

Bulk in bbls 

Bulk in less quantity 

Bladders in bbls 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or lot se. 

Bladders in 25-lh. tins 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 

r ladder* in lu k or tins lessthan 
Varnishes. 
In 5-gal. lots.). 

Carriage, No. 1 2 

" body 8 00 

" rubbing 4 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 

Brown Japan 2 40 

Elastic Oak 2 90 

Furniture, extra 2 40 

No. 1 160 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 

Demar 3 30 

Shellac, white 4 40 

" orange 4 00 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 60 

Black Japan 2 40 

" No. 1 1 60 



24 

1 00 

07 

1 25 
80 
80 
55 

07 

(8 



.... 2 00 

.... 2 15 

.... 2 20 

2 S5 

.... 2 45 

.... 2 75 
1001b 3 CO 

Per gal. 

90 3 30 
9 00 
5 00 
3 40 

2 80 

3 30 
2 80 

2 00 

3 10 
3 60 

3 70 

4 80 
4 40 
2 00 
2 80 
2 00 




The Imperial 
Varnish & Color 
Co's., Limited 
ElastiliteVarni8h 
1 gal. can, each. 
$2 00. 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2 00. 

Maple L eaf 
Coach Enamels ; 
Size 1, 60c. ; 
Size 2, 35c. ; Size 
3, 20c. each. 



Linseed Oil. 

i t„ i ku. a i- j Raw - Boiled. 

1 to 4 bbls delivered $0 82 $0 85 

5 to 9 bbls gj 84 

2c T °ess lt0 ' Hamilton ' Lon <ion and Guelph 
Turpentine . 

Single barrel, freight allowed ... Oil) 

2 to 4 barrels " " , q (3 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb. . 10 10% 

" smalllots 10% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

Pure Olive j jjo 

" Neatsfoot ,,,' °'°° gp 

Glne. 

Common 08% 09 

French Medal 14 14v 

Cabinet, sheet 12 13' 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

fluttner o 18 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Cloth 
Corn 

Flour 



EMERY 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, MOtltreal. 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition . 

Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps. Dom. 50 and 5 percent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 P.O. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartr dges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer., 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
"Dominion" grades, 25 per cent Rival 
and Nitro, net list. 

Brass shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per oent. 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 "0 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of oOO each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

Hand smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5and6gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Perlb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined 4 50 

Wilkinson & Co.'b Anvils, .lb. 09 09% 

Wilkinson & Co.'s Vices.. lb. 09% 10 
Angers. 

Gilmour'B, discount 50 and 10 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, per doz 6 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 33V4 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy'sAxes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality.... 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zino •• 600 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 
Baths. 
Standard Enameled. 

5%-inoh rolled rim, 1st quality 30 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A perlb. 27 

" B 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

D Sl°::v:v::::::::::::::::::::::::: oil 

Aluminum, 99 p.o. pure "Syracuse". . 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 

Brass, 60 per oent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant'8 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, eaoh 125 3 00 

House. 

American, perlb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 

Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, perpross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, full square, Norway 70 

" " full square 70 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 65 

_ Machine Bolts, all sizes 65 

Coach Screws 75 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts •,. 75 

Blank Bolts 65 

Bolt Ends 65 

Nuts , square 4%c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 60 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M. 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 11 00 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 65 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 00 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 6U per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per oent. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% peroent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulio I 25 1 50 



Chalk. 

Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon , per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock'8, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns . 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8- 
No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 58 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout 4 75 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout 5 25 

Fittings 1 25 

Plain Richelieu 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu 4 00 

Fittings 1 25 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 60 

" oval, 17x14 in 150 

" " 19x15 in 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles .Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. &D.,No. 3, perpair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

" " 6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 

Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, is., 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 80 

No. 2, per doz 1 60 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per oent 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 p.c. to 60, 10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per oent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Inches. 

Under26 2 10 4 00 .... 6 00 

26to40 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

41to50 4 75 .... 7 25 

51to60 5 00 .... 8 50 

61 to 70 5 35 .... 9 25 

71to80 5 75 .... 10 50 

81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86to90 14 00 

91to95 15 50 

96tol00 18 00 



GAUGES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each... 165 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 9 00 

" %to'4 14 00 

Leather, I in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web.-perdoz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb 07% 08* 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., perlb.... 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz., net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 100 150 

Fork. 
C. & B, dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. 4 B , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Saw. 
American, per doz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

CroBs-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs, 

Steel barn door :. 585 600 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft. run 10 80 

No. 12,10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in. , per lb 06% 

" 5-in., " .... 06% 

" " 6-in., " ... 06 

" 8-in., " .... 05% 

" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pain 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, disoount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 
HORSE NAILS. 

"O" brand 50 p.o. dis. I _ . . 
"M" brand 50 p.o. rOval head. 

Acadian, 50 and 10 per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



Use Syracu 



abbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



Factories ■ \ 33 2 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 
factories, j and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller 
Light, medium, and heavy. .. 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 GO 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WAKE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Starperdoz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, SO and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c . 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. 4 L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERN8. 

Cold Blast, per doz. . , 7 50 

No. 3 " Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined, 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glas3 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Pish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 190 7 40 

LOCKS 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russell 4 Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 

English and Am., per doz 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS . 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount20p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS 

Canadian, per doz 8 50 100 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 
Disoount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d. and 3d $3 35 $3 85 

3d 3 00 3 52 

4and5d....r 2 75 3 35 

6and7d 2 65 3 20 

8and9d 2 50 3 00 

10andl2d 2 45 2 95 

16 and 20d 2 40 2 90 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 35 2 85 

Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis . 25 per cent 



NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 50 per cent, for McMullen's. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

(J. S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U.S.) 16'/ 2 

Prime White (U.S.) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 

can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 

PICKS. 
Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 1 75 3 00 

Brass head , " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American , 37% 
to 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Impression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste oocks, dis- 
count, 60 percent. 
Jenkins ' disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 percent. 
Standard valves, discount, 60 per per cent. 
Jenkins radiator valves, discount 55 per cent. 
" " " standard, dis., 60 p.c! 

Quick opening valves, discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No. 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1001b. or less 85 

1,000 lb. or more o 80 

Net 30 days. 

PRESSED SPIKES . 
Discount, 25 percent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' Bolid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 6 50 

" 35 " 7 50 

40 " 8 80 



Copper, 30 " 22 00 

" 35 " 26 00 

" 40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 

Cast steel and malleable Canadian list 

50 and 10 p.c. revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 
New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 
RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler 4 Co.'s 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade & Butcher's... 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 60 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartonB, 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets 4 Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. Der lb. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 

RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 37% per cent. 
ROPE, ETC. 

, ... .. „ Sisal. Manila. 

7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 9 13 

%in 10 14 

% and 5-16 in j5 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16% 

" 5-32inch 21% 

" %inch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea I5y s 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn g% 

New Zealand Rope 10% 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 70 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% per cent. 
B & A. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand , Disston's, dis. 12% p.o. 
S. 4D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft 35 55 

S. 4 D.,dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

' frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 00 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 
Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 
"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALES 
B. S. 4M. Scales, 45 p.o. 
Champion, 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 

" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Ohatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 



SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., iron, and steel, 80 p 
Wood R. H., " dis. 75 p.o. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 75 p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 67%p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 67% p.c. 
" R.H. " 62% p.c. 

Drive Screws, 80 percent. 

Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" "on, " 4 25 5 75 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 1 900 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, dis. 60 p c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 n 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

1 Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev. list 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 

STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. ,75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 00 

£ lam •,•••: 00 3 45 

Coopers , discount 45 per cent 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 
STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb, 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

T „. . S, 'P 09 09 

Labrador g jo 

11 Axe ni^ 

Tur^y ;\\:;\ ^ g J° 

Arkansas n 00 ISO 

Water-of-Ayr So 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates of 25 lengths. 

6 inch Per 100 lengths 8 00 

7inch " '.'.'.'. 8 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

S°'!~2 j 0zen in case > net ca8n •••• $4 80 
'No. 6 — 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

o. v. t . . . Peroent. 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk ... 75 & lo 

Cheese-box tacks, blued .80 4 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 5 

tinned 80 & 10 

n.11 ,. .l™ kegs) 40 

Out tacks, blued, in dozens only . .75 & 15 

^weights 60 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80410 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk .85 4 12% 

" brush, blued 4 tinned, bulk..70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 412% 

Zmo tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper taoks ,',"50 

Copper nails .'52 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB. „ „ A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Mont.™*! ' -Canadian Representatives- Montreal 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Trunk nails, blaci tji ana 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued and tinned 65 and 5 

Obair nails ..'.' 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Pine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS 

Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson's per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 2>p c. 
Same, H. &N„ P. S. k W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72Vi, 75 p.c. 



TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D. , discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb ... . 22 26 
Wrapping, nnttled, per pack. 50 60 

Wrapping cotton, 3-Dly 20 

4-ply 26 

Mattress , per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES. 

Hand.perdoz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 012 013 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 percent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, $2.80 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nos. 2 to 5, ad- 



vance 7c. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9, base- 
No. 10, advanoe 7c— No. 11, 14c— No. 12, 
20c-No. 13, 35c— No. 14, 47c-No. 15, 
60c— No. 16,75c. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
—spring wire, $1 — best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 17% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No.l8, 85.50-No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
86.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30-No. 23, 
$7.65 -No. 24, $8-No. 25, $9-No. 26, 
$9.50— No. 27, $10-No. 28. $11— No 29, 
$12-No. 30, $13— No. 31, $14-No. 32, $15 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31, 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil- 
ing, 10c— in 25-1K bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c- in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Galvanized Wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.85 
No. 9, $3.10-No. 10, $4.00— No. 11, $4.05 
No. 12, $3.25-No. 13, $3.35-No. 14, 
$1.40-No. 15, $4.91-No. 16. $5.15. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 
per 1,000 feet 



3 30 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B 
Galvanized 4 barb, 2'a and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 10 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. 'Cleveland, $2.97Vi 
in less than carlots, and $2.85 in carlois. 
Terms, 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 

Ross braid truss cable 4 53 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . . 1 50 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c off 30 days. 

WRENOHE8. 
Acme, 35 to 37V4 percent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 CO 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. 4 K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell'8 Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, perdoz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader perdoz. $60 00 

Royal Canadian " 58 00 

Royal American " 50 00 

Discount, 45 per cent.; terms 4 months, c r 
p.c 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS 
.anadian make, discount, 40 and 5 per cent. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 


Tarred Hemp Rope 


Lathyarn 


Spunyarn 


Sisal Rope 


White Hemp Rope 


Shingleyarn 


Pulp Cord 


Jute Rope 


Bolt Rope 


Bale Rope 


Lobster Marlin 


Russian Rope 


Hide Rope 


Lariat Rope 


Paper Cord 


Marline 


Halyards 


Hemp Packing 


Cheese Cord 


Houseline 


Deep Sealine 


Italian Packing 


Hay Rope 


Hambroline 


Ratline 


Jute Packing 


Fish Cord 


Clotheslines 


Plow Lines 


Drilling Cables and 


Sand Lines 


"FIRMUS" 


Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila hemp obtainable. 




Orders will 


not be accented for second quality or "mixed" goods. 





CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, Limited 



Western Ontario Representative— WM. B. STEWAET 
TEL. 94. 27 Front Street West, TORONTO. 



Montreal, Que. 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



SENE for specimen copy of Phillips' Monthl Machinery 
Register, containing over 5.000 entries of new and 
second-hand machinery of every description. The oldeBt 
established and most successful medium in the world. 
Established 25 years for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to thooe who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per annum, all over the 
world, and is used for continual reference by a large number 
of Arms. It is consequently a most valuable advertising 
medium for all engineers and manufacturers. Subscription , 
6s per annum, price per copy, 6d. Sole Proprietor, Chas. 
D. Phillips, M.IM.E.. Newport, Mon., England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mon ' 



IN BUYING- 



LINSEED OIL 

it is always well to get the purest and 
best — something you can recommend and 
guarantee to your customers. 

Stewart Bros. & Spencer's 

is the best. Name on every barrel. 
Special quotations for import. 



J. WATTERSON & CO. 

MONTREAL, Agents for Canada. 



Lockerby & McGomb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 



Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PBBSCUPPKG BUREAU, 

5C5 Board of Trade Bldg., MONTREAL, QUE. 

Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 

* ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. iRJHPCTS a 9 ° Chan,ber ' st ' 

Not connected with any Sbear Combination. 

CHAS. F. CLARK, President. JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849— 



T' 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Exeoutire Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results mayjustify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its, offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPKd, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen. Man. Western Canada, Toronto, JOHN A. FULTON, Gen, Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



Awarded a Gold Medal at 
PARIS EXPOSITION for 

superiority. That's proof 
enough of their quality, and 
clearly shows that they are 
the best. 



The Bailey 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 



Dominion Pattern 

Cow Tie ^ Stall Fixture 

The special features of the tie and stall fixture are well 
shown in the illustration. As will be noticed the chain is 
very short, which prevents all danger of entanglement with 
the animal's foot. At the same time the form of the fixture 
is such that great freedom is allowed to the head. Because 
of the short chain this tie is much cheaper than the ordin- 
ary patterns. 

The stall fixture is made from a tough quality of steel 
and is very strong. Also, owing to its circular cross-section , 
it is exceedingly rigid. Its simplicity, convenience, cheap- 
ness, and ease of attaching make it very popular with cow 
tie users. 

^ This form of tie and stall fixture are sometimes called 
Niagara pattern. 

American or Flat Link Chain, 

for years the standard cow tie chain in "the States ' 
is now rapidly coming in favor in Canada. Its 
short link, handsome appearance and smooth sur- 
face — which cannot injure the animal's neck — make 
it superior to all other styles of chain for cow ties. 

For sale by all Jobbers ; manufactured by 




ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, 
ONT. 



j 

!! 



'*^%^%'%^%^%^'%^'^%^%/%.-%/%^%^%r'V< 



Eat. IMS 




Inc. 1895 



Black Diamond FileWorks 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve -**• — *- Medals 




\ 



Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 

-* — ^ 




1901 





E. <90l 



> ^^^%<%%>%^%%^%^%^%^%%^%^%^%^%' 



'%%<^5 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Gutta Perch a and Rubber Mfg. Co. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 
49-6 1-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO, C*? 2ti 

Factories — I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Tin Plate 
Company, 

Battery Park Building, New York City. 

Manufacturers ,^^m^^- 

TIN PLATE 
TERNE PLATE 



and' 



BLACK PLATE. 



B.SS.H. THOMPSON « CO'Y 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 

Sole Agents for Dominion of Canada. 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 

Galvanized corrugated sheets 

"BLACKWALL" BRAND 



'WWWWWVWWWW* ^v***. 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



..Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Get the Best. 

Extra 1, 2, and 3. 
LANGWELL'S BABBIT, Montreal 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 12, 1901. 



NO. 2 



■TIBET AHT1-FRICTI0H METRL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other lor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPlOUGH A McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




ALWAYS BRIGHT. 




Galvanized Iron often turns 
black after a short exposure to the 
weather. If so, it's not "Queen's 
Head," which not only keeps its 
color, but outlasts the other iron 
by years. * 



CANADA 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, 
MONTBEAL. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, LIH . TE o 



♦ 





Confidence means success — past, present, 
future success. The Safford Radiators were never 
yet found wanting in a single, vital part. They solve the 
problem of Steam or Hot- Water Heating, because — hav- 
ing no joints they cannot leak, standing a pressure of 140 
lbs. to the square inch they cannot break, having no ob- 
structions in the pipes the heat circulates freely in one 
minute after the heat is turned on 

The Safford Radiators 

are light, 
yet strong — handsome as a Radiator can be. They fit 
circles, curves, angles. There are twenty-five different 
styles. They are the Radiators of Confidence — the original 
invention in screw threaded nipple connections. Send for 
our free, illustrated Booklet — it will give you "Confidence" 
in the largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British flag. 



The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, 

TORONTO, ONT. 



^ LS OF ALL KINDS 

We are handling a complete line of Wood's famous ice 
tools and will be pleased to give you estimates on supplies 
for 1901. 



SAWS 

_ _ PLOWS 

WRITE I M MARKERS 

FOR ■ m. M U * CHISELS 

PRICES - TONGS, Etc. 



ICE 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



-Limited. 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets, toponto 

mlrrmmnTmmltrmmTfTTtTttTWm 

THE -"" ^ 

Abbott-Mitchell 
Iron and Steel Company 

OF ONTARIO, LIMITED. 

Manufacturers of . . . 



Bar Iron and Steel ^ 
I Nails, Spikes 
Horse Shoes . . 
Bolts, Washers, etc. • 



Belleville, 
Ontario. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 






nufacturers of every description of Limited 



cBELTING 



INET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 



' The writer has perTj 



tween t\vent> 



able tto be , 



ustoiArs. 

JQ 



lACHINKRY lO. 



THE 



Canadian RubberC° 

MONTREAL -:•> TORONTO 
WINNIPEG 



, 10440 t: W 
1 t\ N?ll 

'55 38 Jl^S537 



London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



SOME OF THE HEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




No. 15 "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT AND LEFT HAND, AND RIGID, WITH FINGER TURN ON BLADE— 2, 3, 4 and S-in. BLADES. 




No. 20 " Yankee " Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT HAND ONLY, AND RIGID. 3 SIZES, EXTREME LENGTH OPEN, INCLUDING BIT— 14, 17 and 19-inches 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SAP SPOUTS 




^y 



EUREKA " 



Cuts Show 
Full Size 
Of Spouts. 




Patented 189 




THE "EUREKA" 

Steel Sap Spouts 
Are Ever Popular 



iStt 



1 Ecdhttmical ana J/urai^fc 
US9 J Safe and*SccDrc— No Ceaka 



Because l Safe and^Secore — No leakage 

i Easily inserted, does .not injure the tree 



are 



\ Secure Full Flow of Sap 




"IMPERIAL 



ft The "IMPERIAL" is made of 
Heavy Tinned Steel, neatly 
retlnned. Specially adapted 
for covered Sap Buckets. 



ALL PACKED IN CARDBOARD BOXES, 100 EACH. 

Berlin Bronze, made in 22 and 24 gauge. Tinned Steel, made in 20 gauge. 

PRICES ON APPLICATION. 

The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL. 



BLACK SHEETS 



Common, 
Dead Flat, 



Imitation Russia , 
Genuine Russia. 



STANDARD SIZES IN STOCK. SPECIAL SIZES FOR IMPORT. 
PRICES ON APPLICATION. 



SAMUEL, SONS ft BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington Street West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SKATES 



STARR MFG. COS 

standard lines of 
Acme and Hockey Skates 



also UNION HARDWARE CO'S Hockey. 



Toronto Office: 

32 Front St, West 

H. T. Eager. 




Branch House: 

George D. Wood 
& Co., 

Winnipeg. 



LADIES' SKATE WITH LEATHER ANKLE SUPPORT. 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



O 



Wood, Vallance & Co., - Hamilton 



THE NEW BALDWIN 

DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 




BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation— 
Sanitary— Odorless . 
Latest Cleanahle Fea- 
tures — The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Locks 
Ball-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base— in and 

out. 
Bubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. V 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 



Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the East, 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; special 
rtfrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



EXTENDED 
INSURANCE. 



One of the many liberal features embodied in the 
UNCONDITIONAL ACCUMULATIVE POLICY 

issued by the 






v- . 



Confederation 
Life Association. 

HEAD OFFICE-TORONTO. 

is the provision for Extended Insurance. After three full annual premiums 
have beer, paid, the insured is entitled to Extended Insurance for the full 
amount of the policy for a term of years definitely stated therein. Paid-up 
and Cash Values also guaranteed. 

Rates and full information sent on application to the Head Office, To« 
ronto, or to any of the association's agents. 



W. C. Macdonald, 



Actuary. 



J. K. MACDONALD, 

Managing Directot 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Selling Qualities 



Of our splendid Range — 



The 



Imperial Oxfo 

make them the most desirable stock you 
can handle. 

THEIR DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 



and other improved features, give them a quickly ap- 
preciated precedence over other ranges. 

Housewives everywhere praise them enthusiastically. 

Customers realize the superiority on sight —sales 
are easy. 

They're the popular range of Canada. 

Write for our Price List. 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 




TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL 




David Maxwell & Sons 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 



" Maxwell Favorite Churn " Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, 
and Detachable Driving Link Improved for sea- 
son of igoi. Steel or Wood Frame as desired. 



High and Low Wheels, 
from 12-in. to ao-in. 
widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and Cutting 

Plate. 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different 
Sizes. 



Steel Frame. 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 




If your Wholesale House does not offer you 
these articles 

...SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Canada Hardware Co., Limited 

w h o. e saie | DE BRESOLES ST., MONTREAL Wh °r ie 



Importers 



OUR TRAVELLERS are now on the road to secure 
Spring business. DON'T place your orders till you 
examine their samples and prices, which cannot BE 
EQUALLED. 



OUR REPRESENTATIVES ARE : 



Chas. Maxwell 

Eastern Townships 



J. A. Laporte 

Quebec Province, South-East 



J. E. Auger 

Quebec Province, North-East 



■J^ "J# IMF iff 9 'V* ifffr" 



A Happy 

and 

Prosperous 

NEW YEAR 

to all 

our 

friends 

and 

CUSTOMERS. 



•jjk •jj^ ♦jjk •g^ ^j% •gk 



Jos. Dore 

Montreal City and District 



William Leslie 

Ontario Province 



Alex. Henault 

Quebec City and Lower Province 



J. W. RichardSOn, Montreal City 




WE ARE 
AGENTS FOR 




TThe Arcade 
File Works 



Send us a sample 
order, and if the 
FILES are not per- 
fectly satisfactory, 
return them at our 



expense. 



Write us for prices on any lines you may require. 



The Canada Hardware Co., Limited, Montreal 



Heavy Goods, 45 Common St. 



Shelf Goods, 10 De Bresoles St. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




PLYMOUTH" TWINE 



ii 



vwvwwwwwvwww 



is the kind that sells without urging, because it is 

Right in Qu3lity 
Right in Strength 
Right in Length 
Right in Price 

Satisfaction for the Farmer. 

Satisfaction for the Dealer. 



11 Plymouth " is a pleasure as well as a profit to handle, and it is 
all that a binding twine should be. 




Plymouth Binder Twine Agency, McKinnon Bldg., Helinda St., Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 






1901 

Dundas Axes 



are up-to-date in appearance 
and second to none in quality. 




VanTuyl & Fairbank 



Petrolla, Ont. 

Headquarters for . . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps, Casing, Tubing;, 
Fittings. Drilling Tools, 
Cables, etc. 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



THE . . . 

Waggoner 
Extension Ladder. 



XL 



» 11 \ ' 



:r^ 



m, 



iiv 



IS 



i~ q_ji_!_. 11 jjDii ii:.jl ~ 
nil II I I 1 ll li 'I I 



Dundas Axe Works 

DUNDAS, CANADA. 



The strongest, lightest and most convenient ladder in the market. The only really satisfactory extension ladder 
made. Pulls up with a rope. Made in all lengths. Also extension and other step ladders, sawhorses, ironing 
boards, painters' trestles, etc. All first-class goods. Write for quotations to 

The Waggoner Ladder Company, Limited, London, Ont. 



Special list of low-priced Japanned 
and Regalvanize d Wire Cloth. 

o 

24, 30, 36 in. wire, in 50 ft. rolls. 

SAMPLES SENT WHEN DESIRED. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



MURALO 



Awm. 



1 [rjilillia Suilirj fill FaisL 



L 



JtstSS 



—■Tij'ixir" ■ 



THE .URALO CWWANY. 




The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 



E. B. SALYERDS 

Manufacturer of 

Hockey Sticks 

PRESTON, 

Ontario, - Canada. 

The Best Stick. 
Made of Bock Elm. 
Wholesale Trade Only Supplied. 
Ask your Wholesale House for 
the Preston make of Stick. 
Write for Prices. 




THE CENTURY'S 
WALL TINT 

Wonderful strides were made in Wall Tints 
in the 19th century — Muralo, the greatest 
and best of all cold water wall tints, will 
lead in the 20th. Dealers should secure 
agencies quickly. It is well advertised and 
will be more so. The advertising methods 
will bring customers to your store. 
It Sells. It's a Money Maker. 

A. Ramsay & Son, Montreal 

General Agents for Canada. 

J. H. ASHDOWN, Winnipeg, Agent for Manitoba 

andN.W.T. 

MoLEXNAN, McFEELY k CO., Limited, Van 

oouver, Agents for Biitish Columlia. 




it 



DAISY" CHURN oe 

Has tempered steel cased bicycle ball bearings, strongest neat- 
est and most convenient frame. Only two bolts to adjust in 
setting up. Steel Bow Levers, suitable for either a standing or 
sitting posture. Has four wheels and adjustable feet to hold 
stand ste-dy while churning When churn is locked lo stand 
the bow can be used as handles to move it about on the front 
wheels as handy as a baby carriage. Open on both sides to 
centre, giving free space for pail. Made with wood or steel 
stands, wuh Cranks only, or Bow Levers as desired. 

Vollmar Perfect Washer 

Has a most enviable record. A 
perfection of its kind— will wash 
more clothes in less time, do it better 
and easier, with less wear and tear, 
than any other machine. 



Wortman 4 Ward Mfg. Co,, 




Limited 
LONDON, ONT. 

Eastern Branch, 60 McGlll Street, Montreal, Que 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

*4 



HOLD-BACK 

SPRING HINGES. 

NO. 20, JAPANNED. 

NO. 120, ANTIQUE COPPER. 

Have been sold for several years, and 
are acknowledged the most satisfac- 
tory style ever placed upon the mar- 
ket. Only the best material is used 
in its construction. 

Sold by every Jobber in the Dominion. 



e=sr '•' A. R. WOODYATT & CO., eu o E « L T PB 



KEMP'S 

Broad-Hoop 
Roll-Rim 



Milk Can Bottoms 

possess all the points which go to make perfection in Can Bottoms. They have been 
used by a criticizing public for two seasons, and their popularity is evidence of the 
satisfaction which they gave. The roll-rim has no sharp turns, which break the grain 
of the metal and lessen its wearing qualities. It has a broad wearing surface and will 
not damage floors. They do not cost more than inferior bottoms. 

The Iron Clad Trimmings are made the same as the Broad Hoop, and differ from 
them only in having a narrower and thicker hoop, which does not require the roll-rim, 
and, therefore, can be sold cheaper. 





Manufactured by 



- For durability and finish, our Trimmings are unequalled. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., 



Toronto, 
Canada. 




[ VOL XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 12, 1901. 



NO. 2. 



President, 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North- West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland, 
orrioica 

MONTREAL • - - - Board of Trade Building. 

Telephone 1155, 

TORONTO 10 Front Street East. 

Telephone 2148, 
LONDON, ENQ. .... 109 Fleet Street, E.C.. 

J. M. McKim, 
MANCHESTER, ENO. - - - 18 St Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner, 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block. 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N. B. - . . No. 3 Market Whari. 

I. Hunter White, 

NEW YORK. 176 E. 88th Street, 

W.J.Brandt. 

Travelling Subscription Agents : 
T. Donaghy. F. S. Millard. 

Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere ■ ■ • 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Addre..{Ad,crip p t,London > 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



LINSEED OIL AND THE TARIFF. 

INQUIRY for spring supplies of linseed 
oil is developing unusually early this 
season, supposed to be partly owing to 
the fact that merchants in Ontario had a 
good demand for this article during the fall 
months, on account of the unusually fine 
weather, so that their stocks are believed to 
be lower than ordinarily at this season. 

During the past year a large quantity of 
linseed oil came into this market under the 
British preference clause in the Customs 
regulations, especially so after the month of 
July. Some interest is now being evoked 
about this supply for the coming year. 



Linseed oil imported from England is 
produced from flax seed reaching there from 
four different sources, namely, East Indies, 
Russia, United States and Argentine 
Republic. The flax seed shipped from 
India usually comes from Calcutta, and is 
always quoted in the market prices in 
England at a slight advance over others. 
Oil produced from this seed may be entitled 
to the British preference, but, as all goods to 
come under this preference must have a 
substantial portion of British labor entering 
into their production, to the extent of not 
less than one-fourth of the value of such 
article in the condition in which it is ex- 
ported, it is evident that linseed oil produced 
from seed of foreign growth cannot be 
imported into Canada under the preference 
clause of the tariff. 

Oil produced from Calcutta seed usually 
is consumed in England in the months of 
December, January and February. 

Flax is harvested in South America about 
the month of November, and seed exported 
in the month of January reaches England, 
freely, in February and March. Oil pro- 
duced from this seed is then ready for ship- 
ment the last of March or the beginning of 
April, and, for the past seasons, it is oil 
from this seed that has usually reached 
Canada in the months of May and June. 

As the exporter has to make a declara- 
tion, as the following, to enable the goods to 
be passed by the Customs here, and receive 
the British preference, it is believed that no 
producers of linseed oil in England, whose 
attention is called to this fact, will be pre- 
pared to sign the declaration for oils made 
from seed grown in the Argentine Republic: 



ForrrT'of Certificate prescribed to be written, 
printed or stamped on the face or back of in- 
voices of all articles, except raw and refined 
sugars, for entry under the British Preferential 
Tariff of Canada, when made and signed by an 
individual exporter personally. 

I. (1) 

the exporter of the articles included in this invoice, 
have the means of knowing and do hereby certify 

that said invoice being from myself to (2) 

and 

amounting to (3) 

is true and correct ; that all the articles included in 
the said invoice are bona fide the produce or manu- 
facture of one or more of the following countries, 

viz.:— (4) 

and that a substantial portion of the labor of one or 
more of such countries has entered into the pro- 
duction of every manufactured article included in 
said invoice to the extent in each article of not less 
than one- fourth of the value of every such article 
in its present condition ready for export to Canada. 

Signed 

Dated at this 



.19. 



LOWER PRICES ON SCREWS. 

A REDUCTION has been made in 
the price of wood screws. The 
change was made a few hours after 
we went to press last week, and amounts to 
a reduction of about 20 per cent. The new 
discounts, together with those previously in 
force, are as follows : 

New Old 
discounts. discounts. 

Flat head , iron 85 8a 

Round head, iron 8o 75 

Fl .t head, brass 77K 75 

Round head, brass 70 67 1 / 2 

Flat head, bronze yo by% 

Round head, bronzj 65 62% 

The reduction is the concomitant of a 
similar course which the United States 
market took a couple of weeks ago. 

The market in the United States is rather 
demoralized owing to competition, and the 
association over there has found it necessary 
to dissolve the pool and adopt a less rigid 
agreement than that heretofore in existence. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A CALL FOR MORE STEAM. 



SOME of the officials of the Inter- 
colonial Railway should put on more 
steam and pull a little harder on the 
throttle or their system will stop altogether. 
This is the conclusion reached by many 
merchants who have had occasion to use 
the Intercolonial Railway service during the 
last few months. The reason is that it has 
been excessively, disappointingly and, in 
cases, expensively slow. 

Accidents are bound to happen in the 
best regulated families, and some tardiness 
in delivery is excusable, but, when timely 
deliveries are the exception rather than the 
rule, there is need of an investigation into 
the principles on which the road is being 
run. 

It is not only essential that freight should 
reach its destination, but also that it should 
reach it on time. If a railway company 
does not haul its freight in three times the 
length of time taken by an express com- 
pany, then it is not providing reasonable 
accommodation. Judge the Intercolonial 
Railway freight service by that standard 
and one will not find it efficient. 

The loudest complaints come from the 
Maritime Provinces where merchants have 
to rely on this one line entirely. The ser- 
vice this fall seems to have been execrable, 
and travellers who have toured through the 
country find that great dissatisfaction 
exists. 

A merchant in Truro is reported on good 
authority to have entreated incessantly with 
the railway authorities to have a car, which 
had come into the station loaded with goods 
for him, moved into a position where the 
goods could be unloaded, but his prayers 
went unanswered for nine days and only on 
the tenth was the car shifted to where it 
could be approached. 

We have heard of a case within the past 
month where it took more than a month to 
get a car of merchandise from Montreal to 
Moncton, N.B. We have been told that 
goods coming from Halifax to a Montreal 
agent were a month in transmission ; this 
was just before Christmas, and, as part of 
the goods had to be sent to Vancouver, 
B.C., for the holiday trade, the agent was 
put to no small extra expense expressing 
Stock that might have been freighted had 



the Intercolonial given even fairly good 
service. 

A Montreal grocery house sent goods to 
Halifax for the Christmas trade, but, occu- 
pying 10 days in transmission, they were 
too late, and their value was discounted. 
There is no doubt that such instances could 
be multiplied, for the line has been in a 
congested condition for months. 

On Halifax particularly this poor accom- 
modation is having an injurious effect, for 
importers are sending orders to England to 
have all goods sent by St. John or Portland. 
Any way appears to be satisfactory rather 
than that via Halifax. 

A leading Montreal dry goods importer 
remarked to a representative of this paper 
not long since : " We must have goods as 
soon as we can get them, else they are out 
of style before they arrive. According to 
my reckoning it takes about twice the time 
to bring goods from Liverpool by Halifax 
that it does by Portland. I won't have 
goods come by Halifax any more." 

All the fault of this does not lie at the 
doors of the Intercolonial railway, for the 
steamers to Halifax are slower than those to 
Portland. We grant that. But how does 
it come that goods landed off the Allan Line 
steamer at Halifax, as she is leaving her 
mail, do not reach Montreal till a week 
after goods that came by the same boat 
have arrived via Portland ? Surely this is 
to be accounted for only by slow train 
service. 

Just as the Intercolonial by its slow 
service is driving the local freight into 
C.P.R. cars, so is it encouraging importers 
to have their goods brought in by Portland 
rather than by Halifax. This is serious. 
Steam is needed somewhere. Is it in the 
offices or on the road ? 



Deceased, who was 69 years of age at the 
time of his death, was a hardwareman early 
in life, and used to give interesting reminis- 
cences of his experiences in that vocation. 



MR. JAMES PENNYCUICK DEAD. 

Mr. James Pennycuick, inventor of the 
Luxfer prism, died at the Emergency 
Hospital, Toronto, on Wednesday, January 
9. Mr. Pennycuick was a Scotchman by 
birth, and had lived in Newfoundland, 
Boston and Montreal, leaving the latter 
city nine years ago to take up his residence 
in Toronto. His wife is in Boston. The 
cause of death was epilepsy. 



A TOURIST ATTRACTION SCHEME. 

THE energy of Mr. F. H. Clergue, of 
Sault Ste. Marie, appears to be as 
applicable to all requirements as it 
is tireless. Mr. Clergue has established 
various manufacturing industries in Sault 
Ste. Marie, he is developing iron mines in 
Northern Ontario, he is building a railway 
that will enormously facilitate the opening 
up of the country through which it will 
run, and now comes the announcement 
that next summer he will inaugurate two 
steamship lines in order to attract tourist 
travel to points on Lake Erie, Lake Huron, 
Lake Superior and the Georgian Bay. One 
route will be from Midland, via Parry Sound 
and Little Current, to Sault Ste. Marie, 
while the other will make its start at Toledo 
with the Sault as its terminus, calling en 
route at Detroit, Port Huron, Goderich, 
Kincardine, Southampton, Owen Sound, 
Collingwood and Parry Sound. 

Indirectly, this all interests the merchants 
of the places to which these lines of steam- 
ships will bring passengers. Each year 
sees increased numbers of tourists attracted 
to points in Northern Ontario. Last sum- 
mer, as we pointed out in a previous issue, 
the Grand Trunk Railway landed about 30,- 
000 tourists at the Muskoka wharf. But, 
marked as has been the increase in the 
number of tourists attracted to that part of 
the country, the number would have been 
still greater had there been better hotel 
accommodation. 

No doubt Mr. Clergue and those associ- 
ated with him in his latest enterprise will 
take some steps to increase the accommo- 
dation for tourists. But the merchants at 
the points of attraction should interest 
themselves in the matter. Their shoulders 
are needed to the wheel. By, in season and 
out of season, urging the necessity of 
improved accommodation for travellers 
upon their fellow townsmen they can do a 
great deal toward bringing about the im- 
provements desired. Self-interest, if noth- 
ing else, should actuate them, for there are 
none that reap greater benefit from tourist 
travel than the merchants. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



NO STOVE CONSOLIDATION. 



THE undertaking began early last year 
to consolidate the stove manufacturers 
in Ontario has failed. 

The concerns which were to form the 
proposed consolidation were : The Buck 
Stove Co., Limited, Brantford ; The Mc- 
Clary Mfg. Co., Limited, London ; Stewart 
& Co., Woodstock; The Smart Manufac- 
turing Co., Brockville ; The Gurney-Tilden 
Co., Copp Bros., Burrow, Stewart & Milne 
and Bowes, Jamieson & Co., Hamilton. 
On the plant, etc., of all these firms an 
option was secured by the promoters, the 
basis of purchase being a cash one. 

The amount of money wanted to carry 
out the idea was between $7,000,000 and 
$8,000,000. To interest that amount was 
one of the first difficulties experienced. 
And the manufacturers who had given 
options were asked to take part of the 
purchase price in stock. This, some of 
them, at anyrate, would not do. And now 
the time limit is expired and the deal is off, 
although a press despatch says that another 
option has been secured on the plant, etc., 
of some of the stove foundries in Ham- 
ilton. 

A CANADIAN AGENT WANTED. 

AT a recent meeting of the Bristol 
Chamber of Commerce, a letter 
was read from Mr. Savile Webb, 
urging that an effort be made to induce the 
Canadian Government to appoint an agent 
for that city. Mr. Webb, who is a member 
of the firm of Purnell, Webb & Co., Bris- 
tol, pointed out that the Council of the 
Chamber had, two years before, urged the 
Canadian authorities to make such appoint- 
ment. 

The Chamber concurred in the views of 
Mr. Webb and resolved to make another 
urgent request to the Canadian Govern- 
ment for the prompt appointment of an 
agent. 

Trade between Canada and Bristol is 
growing, and a practical business man 
located there as the representative of Can- 
ada could do much towards still further 
developing it. A direct line of steamships 
has for some time been running between 
this country and that port. 

The merchants of Bristol want the agent 
appointed, so that they can be kept in- 



formed as to tariff and other matters apper- 
taining to Canada. But, useful as such an 
agent may be to the merchants of Bristol, 
he would be equally or more so to the 
businesss men in Canada interested in the 
export trade. 

It is not necessary to dwell upon the 
importance of Bristol as a commercial 
centre. That is already well known. And 
that is all the more reason why there should 
be a speedy compliance, on the part of the 
Dominion Government, with the wishes of 
such an important body as the Bristol 
Chamber of Commerce. 



THOROUGHNESS IN BUSINESS 
MATTERS. 

THE importance of training for a com- 
mercial career is daily becoming 
more recognized. There was a time, 
and not very distant, either, when this was 
not so generally recognized as it is to-day. 

Circumstances, we are told, alter cases. 
And the circumstances of to day are such 
as to demand a higher state of efficiency in 
men intended for commercial careers than 
was the case even a decade ago. 

To succeed in business men must know 
more than those whose places they are 
taking. "They must be up-to-date" as 
we commonly express it. Everywhere 
thinking men are preaching this doctrine. 

In an address recently delivered in 
London, Eng., Sir Courtenay Boyle, K.C.B., 
permanent secretary of the Board of Trade, 
said that his experience was that in business 
there was as much technique to be learned, 
as much method to be acquired, as there 
was in any other of the spheres of life. 
There is no question as to the truthfulness 
of that statement. Of lawyers, of doctors, 
of skilled mechanics we demand knowledge 
in their respective vocations before we 
engage them. And if in such vocations, 
why not in that of business ? 

Of all vocations, there is none that calls 
for more intelligence, more practical know- 
ledge, more executive ability than a com- 
mercial career. The business man must 
know when to buy, how to buy, and what 
to buy. He must be in a position to judge 
the quality of the goods he handles. He 
must be conversant with business customs 
and methods. In a word, he must be so 



well acquainted with the commercial 
machinery that he will know how to get 
the best results from it. 

We have been passing through an age of 
drift. The most of us pick up a book to be 
entertained. To gather knowledge from it 
is often foreign to our thought. Our reading 
is consequently superficial. And it is the 
same, too often, in our daily vocation. We 
do not enter it with a determination to 
familiarize ourselves with it and thereby 
reach the highest rung in the ladder. We 
may desire to reach the topmost rung, but 
we do not care to climb there. We want to 
slide there, just as, when boys, we used to 
slide down the stair bannister. We forget 
that sliding takes us down and not up. 

But we are realizing this. And born of 
this realization is a desire to be Thorough. 
It is time, too, for in every community there 
is a search for the Thorough man. 



AUGERS AND AUGER BITS LOWER. 

A change is announced in the price of 
Gilmour's augers and auger bits. 

In the augers, both the list and discounts 
are new. The list price shows an advance 
of about 50c. per dozen all through, but the 
cost to the trade is about 20 per cent, less 
than before, on account of an increase in 
the discount. 

No change has been made on auger bits, 
but the discount has been increased, so that 
the price is really from 10 to 12^ per cent, 
lower than before. 



AN AGREEMENT COLLAPSES. 

The agreement which has for some time 
existed among the manufacturers in regard 
to the price of stovepipe elbows has col- 
lapsed. The cause was the belief that 
some parties to the agreement were not 
keeping it. 

Prices are now open and, as a result, 
lower. No. 1, which was formerly quoted 
at $1.80, is now being offered at $1.40, and 
No. 2 is quoted at $1.20, instead of $1.60. 

It is asserted that purchases can be made 
at even lower figures than those named. 

The agreement in regard to stovepipes 
has not been affected, although prices are 
this week $1 per 100 lengths lower. Five 
and six-inch pipes are now quoted at $7 per 
100 lengths, and 7-in. at $7.50. It is a 
year since a change was last made in the 
price of stovepipes. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A TRAVELER'S CONTRACT. 

WE have before us the copy of a 
contract made by a certain travel- 
ling man with a customer to whom 
he had just sold a bill of goods, upon which 
the traveller, while the ink was still wet, 
doubtless looked with admiration as ex- 
pressing in the briefest possible form what 
he intended to say, but when it reached the 
credit man of his house, and particularly 
when the account became, as the credit 
man understood it, due, there did not seem 
to be so much reason for gratulation. 

The clause of the contract relating to the 
time of payment read as follows : 

The goods ordered herein to be settled by note due in 
two months from date of invoice ; all on hand at end of 
two months to be credited on note given and new note 
given for like amount due in four months without interest. 

Naturally enough, the purchaser, at the 
end of two months from the date of invoice, 
claimed four months more time on the 
goods remaining unsold ; but this was not 
what the traveller had intended ; he claimed 
that the note was to be due four months 
from the date of the invoice. 

The question naturally arises, if that was 
what he meant, why did he not say so ? 
The man who draws up a contract must 
cultivate the ability to detect, in forms of 
expressions which he is tempted to employ, 
other meanings than those which he 
intended to put into them. If he makes an 



agreement providing for " payment in four 
months," he certainly ought to know that 
unless he is careful to state the beginning 
of the period very clearly the other party to 
the contract will claim the interpretation 
which is most favorable to his own interests. 

It may be said that this is a question for 
the schoolmaster rather than for the credit 
man ; that what is required is the ability to 
write good, plain, unmistakable English. 
That is exactly the point. The travelling 
man must cultivate that ability. If he 
missed the training while a schoolboy, he 
must make it up by extra care now. 

A young Kansas lawyer has convinced 
himself that the decrease of business for 
lawyers is due to the increase in general 
culture ; that men carefully trained in the 
schools are less likely to find themselves in 
a position where the advice or assistance of 
a lawyer is necessary than one who has not 
availed himself of such advantages. We 
think he is right. Certainly, the travelling 
man whose " mind's eye" is keen to detect 
the various constructions that may be placed 
upon an ambiguous sentence will find that 
the contracts made by him involve his 
house in less differences of opinion with 
the customers than will he who is content to 
write what he thinks will express his inten- 
tion, and leave the credit man to fight it 
out. — Credit Man. 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 

Those having any items of news suitable for this column wiU 
confer a favor by forwarding them to this office addressed 
to the Editor. 



T 



HE SEYBOLD & SONS CO., whole- 
sale hardware dealers, Montreal, are 
seeking incorporation. 



The Imperial Oil Co. propose establish- 
ing an oil depot to be situated at Frederic- 
ton, N.B. 

The Ottawa and Hull Power and Manu- 
facturing Co., Limited, Hull, Que., are 
seeking incorporation. 

The Hamilton Bridge Works Co. has 
closed a contract to construct a big steel 
tow barge, about 200 feet long, for the 
Montreal Transportation Co. 

On Monday, a bylaw was submitted to 
the voters of Kingston, Ont., in favor of 
bonusing and exempting from taxes a 
smelter proposed for that city. It was 
carried by a vote of 1,296 to 166. 

R. L. F. Strathy, formerly of Welland, 
Ont., has organized a company in Owen 
Sound, Ont., to manufacture a patent wire 
fence. He expects to have a 120 x 40 ft. 
two storey factory running by spring. Fifty 
hands will be employed at the commence- 
ment, and in two years it is expected that 
200 hands will be at work. 



THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 



Asbestos 

Disk 

Valve 

A First-Class 

and Reliable Valve. 




Also. 



The Fairbanks 
Standard Scales 

Pipe Fittings 

Pipe and Mill Supplies 

Send for 

our New Catalogues. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO., 749 Craig St., MONTREAL 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



CANADIAN EXPORTS TO BRITIAN. 

THE statistics for the year 1900, which 
have been compiled by the London, 
Eng., Board of Trade and which 
were issued this week, show that Canada's 
export trade with Great Biitain continues to 
show steady development. 

The three years preceding 1900 showed 
such a remarkable increase in exports of 
our food products that it was held by many 
that we would do well to maintain the 
volume of business done in 1899 Others 
were more optimistic, and expressed con- 
fidence in our ability to supply, and 
Britain's willingness to purchase, a still 
greater quantity of our produce. 

The returns show that with the exception 
of butter and flour, which were not produced 
in as large quantity as in 1899, our exports 
show large increases. 

Our exports of grains show increases of 
$2,025,000 in wheat ; $2, 045,000 in oats, 
and 1 1 80, 000 in peas. This more than 
compensates for the decrease shown in our 
flour trade, $2,915,000. Our sales of 
cheese were $3,925,000 larger than in the 
previous year. This effectually offsets the 
loss in butter trade, which fell off $2,365,- 
000 in the year. Our sales of bacon and 
hams were $2,290,000 larger than in 1899. 
Our exports of fish increased $1,415,000. 
Of eggs, we sent $275,000 more than in the 
previous year. 

Apart from produce the only change of 
consequence was an increase in wood pro- 
ducts. The sales of Canadian-sawn wood 
to Britain increased $2,110,000 during the 
year, while our sales of wood pulp were 
$655,000, and of hewn wood $350,000 
greater than in 1899. 



A FALLACIOUS POLICY. 

SOME business houses which otherwise 
would have a fair rating are practically 
blacklisted because they pursue the 
highly fallacious policy of trying to take 
advantage of everyone with whom they do 
business, says an exchange. Some one 
connected with the house poses as a 
"kicker." He disputes every bill, every 
shipment of goods received, every order 
placed, and practically everything. By 
sedulously cultivating this unenviable trait 
for a few years he reaches the point where 
he tries to take advantage of people as a 
matter of course, and really thinks it is a 
trait of superior business attainments for 
him to be able to find fault as he does, and 
scale down bills, get allowances, etc. 

No doubt a persistent faultfinder of this 
kind can succeed in getting many a con- 
cession. A business concern, in many 
instances, will sooner stand the loss than 
keep up a contention, although it may be 



Out of Your Own Pocket 

you pay good money for every pound of white lead you sell. 

Figure it for yourself: 

How much do you make on 100 lbs. of lead? How much 
does it cost you to do business ? What, then, are you paying for the 
privilege of selling lead and oil ? 

If you want to make a profit on paint drop lead and oil and 
push 

The sherwin Williams paint 

It gives both a money profit and a reputation profit. It sells 
better, wears better and is a better proposition in every way than 
lead and oil or any other painting material on the market. 

It brings big business for your whole store. The quality of 
the paint and the methods back of it bring success. 

"B-13 " — a booklet — will tell you more. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



NbVt YORK. 
MONTREAL. 



BOSTON. 
TORONTO. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY. 




positive that it is right. 1c prefers to stand 
that loss and either not do business with the 
faultfinder afterward, or watch him so 
closely that he cannot ply his favorite call- 
ing successfully. It doesn't pay to be small 
in regard to anything in this day and age 
of the world, and one small man can soon 
ruin a big business, if he is left to carry out 
his smallness. Faultfinding will speedily 
bear a crop of retribution, which has 
swamped more than one concern in the 
end. It not only pays to be honest for 
honesty's sake, but it is a splendid policy 
to pursue. To such an extent is this recog- 
nized by the leading mercantile agencies, 
that they invariably make a note in their 
reports whether a house deals fairly and 
above board, or whether it tries to take 
advantage of those with whom it does 
business. 

If you discover that a house is in the 
habit of doing business of this kind, the 
thing to do is to shun it as you would the 
plague, because no matter how much you 
may endeavor to conduct trade with it 
satisfactorily, you are sure to suffer in the 
end. Frequently a small man is elevated 
to an important position in a large house, 
and he thinks he can earn his salary best 
by meanness of this kind. If he isn't 
pulled down, he will pull the house down, 
no matter what its reputation may have 



been in past years. That is why there is 
always an opportunity for honest, honor- 
able and progressive young men in all lines 
of industry. Perhaps it is well that it is so, 
because otherwise the rising generations 
wouldn't have a chance. 



COMPANY TO LIQUIDATE. 

The Ossekeag Stamping Company, 
manufacturers of granite and tin ware at 
Hampton, N.B., has decided to go into 
liquidation. The industry, which is the 
largest in King's county, employing from 
75 to 100 hands, was established by Charles 
Palmer and James E. Whittaker. On the 
death of Mr. Palmer it passed into the 
control of creditors, by whom the works 
were kept going. The Bank of Nova 
Scotia recently issued writs against the 
company to collect notes made by Fred S. 
Whittaker, of St. John, who is now in 
Dorchester penitentiary under a forgery 
charge. Though the company denies lia- 
bility for the notes, it was decided, in view 
of the litigation, to go into liquidation. 



The Kingston Locomotive Works are again 
showing signs of the activity of former 
years. Two hundred men are now em- 
ployed and the men are all working full 
time. The force is being gradually 
increased. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN TRADE WITH JAPAN. 

SOME valuable suggestions regarding 
Canadian trade in Japan are con- 
tained in a letter from Malcolm C. 
Fenwick, of Kobe, formerly of this country, 
to George Anderson, who, it will be remem- 
bered, visited the land of the chrysan- 
themum as Canadian trade commissioner a 
couple of years ago. Mr. Fenwick has had 
considerable experience in Japan in the 
commission business and writes of what he 
knows. He says that during the past sea- 
son he has sold goods in the following 
lines : 

Foodstuffs — Canned goods (fruits and 
vegetables), packing-house products (hams, 
and bacon), butter in tins and wood, con- 
densed milk (sweetened and unsweetened), 
cheese (small full cream, about 9 lb., most 
popular). 

Dry Goods — Suspenders, furs, cotton 
fabrics. There is a large market in woollen 
cloths, woollen underclothing, woollen 
blankets, Mr. Fenwick says, which he has 
barely touched. 

Sundries — Soaps, perfumes, cosmetiques, 
for which there is much and constant 
demand ; iron, nails, watches, watch 
cases, jewellery, cutlery, bicycles, guns, 
sewing machines, in each of which there is 
an enormous trade. 

Mr. Fenwick quotes the present through 
rate of the combined railways and steam- 
ship companies connecting with the east, 
and says he presumes the Canadian divi- 
sions of these lines will conform thereto. 
R. H. Countess, San Francisco, is the 
agent, and the following the present tariff 

per 100 pounds : 

Per Less than 

car. car. 

Canned goods $ 90 $1 50 

Packinghouse products... 1 10 1 60 

Piece goods 1 10 1 75 

Machinery K. D. in pieces 1 00 2 50 

Machinery K. D in boxes. 1 00 2 00 

The writer goes on to say that he receives 
a commission from the manufacturers on all 
goods, and usually gives the agency of a 
given product to a resident merchant, and 
then works up a trade through him by 
securing him orders. His idea of working 
up a trade for Canadian manufacturers is to 
secure a sample room temporarily in each 
port or large city, visited for a month or six 
weeks at a time periodically, and samples 
being displayed and advertisements pub- 
lished in the local papers, native and 
foreign. The Japanese are now making 
every effort to deal direct, and independent 
of the foreign commission merchant. Mr. 
Fenwick says if this were thought advisable, 
goods would have to be shipped against 
B.L. and freight paid by draft with order. 
This freight would also serve the second 
purpose of bargain money. He regards 



this as a popular scheme and one that would 
help to secure a footing against American, 
English, French and German goods already 
established. Mr. Fenwick concludes with 
an expression of opinion that our Canadian 
railways, especially the Canadian Pacific, 
should be prepared to do something better 



for Canadian trade than the regular through 
rates quoted above. — The Globe. 



The owners of the Coldbrook Rolling 
Mills, St. John.N.B., have decided to rebuild 
the mills. It is estimated that the restora- 
tion will cost about $30,000. 



IVER JOHNSON 

PROGRESSIVENESS 
OPULARIZES 
RODUCTS 
ROTEOTS 
RICES AND 
RESERVES 
ROFITS 

The Iver Johnson Bicycle 

-Is- 

An Honest Cycle at an Honest Price. 

Send for new illustrated catalogue showing new improvements. 

Harry Elkes and Major Taylor, Champions of the World, 
ride the Iver Johnson Racer. 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 

FITCHBURG, Mass. 



Branches — New York— 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 364 Main St. 



»••« 



OUR REPRESENTATIVES 

are now on the road with 
a full line of samples and 
revised prices, and will soon 
be with you. It will be to 
your advantage to await 
their arrival, as they have 
with them the best brush 
values on the market 



i 



BOECKH BROS. & COMPANY 

80 York Street - TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 15 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 

H °only LE 37-39 Front Street West, foronto. wholesale 

SPRING SKATES. pe ?&; 

« ""..;.- ^~™T8!B1^^ No. 5— Ordinary Quality $.80 

IIP^jmIwM 7 -Best, Quality 1.50 

rih^ y ^ ~_ ^jj =mv,^^:§& . jfg^ 10 Plated 1.90 

12— " " " Concaved Blades 2.80 
All sizes to 12', inches. 

LADIES' SKATES. 

No. 415— Ordinary Quality, Plated $1.40 

1422— Bgst Quality, Plated 2.30 

JM& " " " Con. Runners 2.70 

*4j£-Extra " " Light Runners 3.50 

^f *^ ^» All sizes, 8H to 10 M inohes. 

y fr* ^vWtfKEY SKATES. 

No. 510ji — Ordinary Quality, all sizes, 

7 to 12 in $ .60 

1531— Best Quality, all sizes, 8 to 12 in. 1.60 

'%) f* JA^^ a> No. 631— Best Quality, all sizes, 9 to 12 in. . $1.80 

632— " " Plated, all sizes, 

9 to 12 in 2.50 




No. 634— Best Quality, Plated, all sizes, 

9 to UK in., Conoave Blades. $2.90 



No. 3697— Best Quality, Plated, all sizes, 

10 to 12 in $4.00 

Also the following lines of "Mic-Mac" Hockey Sticks. S„, 

Genuine "Starr" Halifax Skates. ^— — ■j...._ «> 

List per pair. 
No. 90— "ACME" Spring, all sizes, 7 to 11 in .... $. 80 

25 - 8 to 12 in... 1.80 "Mic-Mac" 

7— 9 toll' : in 3 00 SB mic mac 

20-Hookey, all sizes 9 to UK in.. 1.60 ^J Yellow BircK, Toughest a.id Strongest, $8.00 doz. 

9 to 11 M in. . 1.80 Our stock this season has been carefully selected, and the " Mic Mac" 1900 is the 

25PS- " " 9tol2in... 2.40 BEST STICK on the market. 

The above are List Prices and subject to Liberal Trade Discount. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 

sh?pm p . t nt8 Graham Wire aid Gnt Nails are tbe Best. S5 ™ht s 




16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A COMBINATION OF NORTHERN 
AND SOUTHERN ENERGY. 

ON page 27 will be found a combina- 
tion advertisement of The Smith & 
Hemenway Co., Utica Drop Forge 
& Tool Co., and Thomson Bros. & Co., the 
latter manufacturers of the Seavey mitre 
box. 

Mr. L. P. Smith, president of The Smith 
& Hemenway Co., is a Southern man, born 
and bred in the good old State of Ten- 
nessee, educated in the hardware business 
in Memphis and afterwards in St. Louis in 
one of the well known jobbing houses in 
this branch of business. 

Deciding to come East in 1895 in order 
to cast his lot with "the big fish," he 
formed the firm of Smith, Herlitz & Co., 
who were importers of hardware specialties, 
and continued under that name for sorrte- 



more commodious quarters at No. 20 
Warren street. After the expiration of 
another year they found these quarters 
entirely too small, and removed to No. 296 
Broadway, in order to have room enough 
to conduct their growing business on the 
lines they desired. 

Ttte Smith & Hemenway Co. succeeded 
to the business of the following concerns : 
Smith & Patterson, Maltby-Henley Co., 
Bindley Automatic Wrench Co., Anderberg 
Importing Co , John Byrnes, glass-cutter 
manufacturer, all of New York City. 

Sjon after their organization, the Smith 
& Hemenway Co. associated themselves 
with the Utica Drop Forge and Tool Co., 
of Utica, New York. The Utica Drop Forge 
and Tool Co. are successors to the Inter- 
changeable Tool Co. and the Russell Hard- 
ware and Implement Manufacturing Co. 



turers of the well known Seavy mitre box , 
and since that time have improved this 
article, until they have to day what they 
might call perfection in this individual line. 



thing over a year. ^S^Their New York office is with the Smith & 

His next venture was with Mr. £ '<B. Herfrenjy.y Co., New York City, where all 
Patterson, and the partnership under the \catalogues'frld i (*M<$ipns can be obtained. 




*^=» 



FOR STORE AND WINDOW 
DISPLAYS. 

A novelty to help store or window display 
is the Adjustable Display Stand which E. 
M. Marshall, of Strathroy, Chit., is offering 
the trade. It is made so that it can be hung 
on the wall, set down close on the base of 
the window, or used 



as an adj ustabl e 
table. A more use- 
ful or practical piece 
of store furniture is 
hard to imagine, as 
it may be put to so 
many purposes, is so 
durable, and displays 
goods to perfection. 
A card to Mr. Mar- 
shall will bring prices 
and full description. 
The Other illustra- " The Marshall." 

tions, which appear in the advertisement, 
will show to the reader how the display 
stand can be made to assume different 
shapes, thus adapting itself to the place and 
thfepurpose required. In recent novelties 




th^l 

V£sV 



ore appliances it stands pre-eminent. 



Seavey Mitre Box. 



name of Smith & Patterson was continued 
for two years, when early in 1898 an incor- 
porated company with the name of The 
Smith & Hemenway Co. was formed on 
broader lines, and with Mr. J. F. Hemen- 
way, a native of the "Empire State," as 
secretary and treasurer, whose earlier 
experience as manager and treasurer of the 
Empire Wringer Co., of Auburn, N. Y., and 
as assistant general manager and assistant 
treasurer of the American Wringer Co., of 
Providence, R I., and New York City, had 
eminently fitted him to take an active part 
in pushing to the front the new enterprise. 
They combined forces with a view of be- 
coming leaders in their special line of busi- 
ness, that is, manufacturing hardware and 
hardware specialties. For less than a year 
they continued at the old stand, No. 10 
Warren street, New York City; but, finding 
the place entirely inadequate for the grow- 
ng business, they moved to larger and 



At the organization both companies were 
small, but, both being composed of young 
blood, they forged their way forward until 
they have a line of hardware specialties and 
tools second to none in the world, showing 
conclusively that young blood and energy 
will assert itself under all conditions. The 
Smith & Hemenway Co.'s line comprises a 
large number of different articles in the 
hardware specialty line. The Utica Drop 
Forge and Tool Co. manufacture the largest 
line of nippers and pliers made by any one 
factory in the world. 

The Smith & Hemenway Co. have re- 
cently organized The Schatz Hardware 
Manufacturing Co., Mount Carmel, Conn., 
for the manufacture of nail pullers and 
hardware specialties. 

In the fall of 1899 The Smith & Hemen- 
way Co. associated themselves with Thom- 
son Bros. & Co., Lowell, Mass., manufac 



CREATING TRADE. 

If a merchant were to close his store and 
suspend business every time trade lagged 
he would rightly be branded as a simpleton, 
remarks a contemporary. And yet in what 
essential would he differ from the advertiser 
who stops advertising for the same reason ? 
One sells goods by means of spoken words, 
and the other by means of printed ; their 
object is identical. It should be plain to 
the crudest understanding that the time to 
bid most aggressively for trade is when 
trade seems most elusive. The alert store- 
keeper, instead of waiting for something to 
turn up, turns up something. He changes 
his window display and show cards, offers 
particularly tempting values, and employs 
every device suggested by a nimble wit to 
turn dullness into activity. He is bold and 
persistent, and therefore in most instances 
wins his way. 



Mr. W. S. Leslie, of Montreal, arrived in 
Toronto on Thursday morning. 

Mr. S. H. Warnock, who has for some 
time, successfully represented Lewis Bros. 
& Co., Montreal, in Manitoba and the 
Northwest Territories, has severed his con- 
nection with this firm and engaged to travel 
for Limplough & McNaughton, Montreal. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE LIGHT 

- OF — 

EIGHT OIL LAMPS 

— FOR THE - 

COST OF TWO. 



100 CANDLE POWER 

FOR 

50 cents a month with 

gasoline at 40 cents a 

gallon. 

Satisfaction guaranteed or money 
refunded. 




The Auer Gasoline Lamp 

CHEAPER { tui A m f ANY 
BRIGHTER } THAN I OTHER LIGHT 

Write for Catalogue"*"""*-* ^* 

AUER LIGHT CO. 

1682 Notre Dame, .... MONTREAL 
E. SIMPSON ft CO., MOOSE JAW, Agents for the Territories. 



HANDLE THIS FOR 1901. 




•*AMSAY&SOl* 

^PAINT MANUFACTUHERS.MOI!Ig^. 



RAMSAYS are mon '*y-iTiakirig paints for Paint Handlers. Are 

f? *T' ■?■ -T~ V^ y° u handling paints? Write to us and see what we 

P/VIIM I S can do for you. Hundreds of well-known paint men 

are making money with Ramsays Paints. Paints for 

the house, the barn, the carriage, the waggon — paints for everything. Ramsays 

Paints sell on their merits and retain custom . Prices are right and profits 

are sure. 



A. RAMSAY & SON, 



PAINT 
MAKERS 



Montreal 



HOW SATIN WHITE IS MADE. 

SATIN white is a pigment much used in 
the paper making and wall paper 
trades, for various purposes, on 
account of its being fairly cheap, being 
very light, its purity of color, and the fact 
that it has a strong lustre and takes a polish 
when rubbed. It can be made in several 
ways. The following are given by a writer 
in a London technical journal : 280 lb. of 
good, well-burnt quicklime are carefully 
slaked with water, and made into a thin 
milk. This is strained, so as to free it from 
grit and lumps of matter, and the liquor run 
into a tank. There is next added 90 lb. of 
soda crystals dissolved in 90 gal. of water, 
which is followed by a solution of 200 lb. 
of alumina sulphate in 200 gal. of water. 
The "white" precipitates out, is allowed 
to settle ; the top liquor is run off, and fresh 
water run in to wash the white, which is 
then filtered off, pressed, and dried in the 
usual way. 

A rather better quality is made by taking 
3 cwt. of good quicklime, and straining, as 
before. To the milk of lime so made there 
is added a solution of 6 cwt. of sulphate of 
alumina in 600 gal. of water. The satin 
white precipitates out at once, and it is 
washed, filtered, pressed, and dried in the 
usual way. 

The first of these two whites will consist 
of a mixture of sulphate of lime and alumina 



CONDENSED OR '« WANT 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



WELLAND CANAL. 
Tenders for Supplies for the year 1901. 

SE\LED TENDERS for supplies, addressed to the 
Superintending Engineer, Welland Canal, St. 
Catharines, wi.l be received until 20 o'clock on Wednesday, 
161b. January, 1901, for the supply and delivery of various 
articles of Timber, Hardware, Castings, Fuel, Paints, 
Oils, etc., for use on the Welland Canal and its branches 
for the year 1901. 

Specifications, forms of tender and other information 
can be obtained at the Superintending Engineer's Office, 
St. Catharines, on and after Monday, the 24th December, 
1900. 

The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. 

L. K. JONES, 

Secretary. 
Department of Railways and Canals, 

Ottawa, December 20th, 1900. (2) 



hydrate only. A preparation where mag- 
nesium carbonate replaces the lime is made 
in the following way : ioo lb. of magnesium 
chloride and ioo lb. alumina sulphate are 
dissolved in water, and 400 lb. of soda 
crystals are dissolved separately in water. 
The two solutions are mixed, and the 
" white," which is a mixture of carbonate 
of magnesia and alumina hydrate, is filtered 
off, washed, pressed, and dried in the usual 
manner. In making the white by any of 
these processes, the more dilute the liquids 
the finer will be the white which is produced. 



BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES- 

Firms desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best possible 
terms, or who are willing to become agents for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ulars of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 

"SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE,' 

168 Fleet Street, London, England. 

"Commercial Intelligence" circulates all over 
the United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 

Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January n, 1901. 
HABDWAEB. 

AS is to be expected at this time of 
year the hardware business is not 
brisk. The demand maintains fair 
proportions, however, and there is not that 
post-holiday sluggishness sometimes experi- 
enced in the first month of the year. Letter 
orders are quite frequent for sorting stocks 
of winter goods. Any real activity that is 
noticeable is to be found in connection with 
booking orders for spring delivery. Poultry 
netting is being sold now quite generally at 
50 and 5 per cent, off, and green wire 
cloth at $1.35 per 100 sq. ft. The discounts 
on screws have been raised 5 per cent, all 
around. White lead has advanced 25c. 
per 100 lb. Some of the smaller sizes of 
galvanized wire have been lowered, and 
some of the larger raised in price. These 
comprise the changes in prices for the week. 

Barb Wire — A little future business 
continues to be done at $3.20 f.o.b. Mont- 
real in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — The price list has 



been altered slightly in the smaller sizes, 
some of the smaller sizes being reduced 
20c. , and some of the larger raised 10c. We 
quote: No. 5, 54.25; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge 
$3.55 ; No. 9, #3.10; No. 10, $3.75 ; 
No. 11, I3.85; No. 12, $3.25; No. 13, 
53-35: No - x 4. 54-25; No. 15, $4-75; 
No. 16, $5.00. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is still little 
doing from stock, but a few lots of oiled and 
annealed wire for spring shipment are being 
booked. The price is $2.80 per 100 lb. 

Fine Steel Wire — This line is feature- 
less. The discount is 17 >£ per cent, off the 
list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — Few in- 
quiries are being received for these goods 
just now. Discounts are 55 and z% per 
cent, on brass, and 50 and 2 j£ per cent, on 
copper. 

Fence Staples — There is little doing in 
staples. We quote : $3.25 for bright, and 
53-75 for galvanized, per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Prices remain unchanged. 
Trade continues in a quiet, steady way, at 
52.85 for small lots and $2.75 for carlots, 



f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Gananoque, and St. John, N.B. 

Cut Nails — The existing prices of cut 
nails have been confirmed. A fair trade is 
passing. We quote as follows : J2.35 for 
small and $2.25 for carlots; flour barrel 
nails, 25 per cent, discount; coopers' nails, 
30 per cent, discount. 

Horse Nails — A small trade has been 
done this week with the discounts 50 per 
cent, on Standard and 50 and 10 per cent, 
on Acadia. 

Horseshoes — The demand keeps 
up remarkably well. We quote as 
follows : Iron shoes, light and me- 
dium pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.50; 
No. 1 and smaller, 53.75 ; snow shoes, No. 
2 and larger, 53-75 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.00 ; X L steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.85 ; feather-weight, all sizes, 5485; toe 
weight steel shoes, all sizes, 55-95 f-°-b- 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, ioc. extra. 

Poultry Netting — The ruling discount 
now is 50 and 5 per cent., where it was 50 



The "SAMSON" Seamless Mill Can Bottom 




Patented July 23, 1900. 
NO STRAINED METAL. 



is made from ONE PIECE of SHEET STEEL. 

The construction is such that no sharp 
corners are left on inside of can, after inserting 
the body tin, to allow of dirt lodging, and requiring 
only one-half the amount of solder to make a 
can that it does with a pieced bottom. 

No Rivets in bottom to break away. 

All Bottoms of each size are uniform, being 
drawn by the same die. 

The Large Roll at bottom always wears 
round and allows filled cans to be easily drawn 

«»'over the floor. 

WILL NEVER WEAR THROUGH. 




Patented 
July 23, 1900. 



Will not tear the flooring or bottom of waggon. STRONGEST, CLEANEST, CHEAPEST to make up. 

We also carry a full line of Tinned Sheets for Milk Can Body and Cheese Vat stock. 



BETURNED- 

TORONTO. 



^VlNNrH 



TORONTO. MONTREAL. WlNNrWEoiyOl VA 

YOU want the BEST so order the "SAMSON.'' 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



1!) 



For difficult work in gal- 
vanized iron, you use Apollo 
of course. 

For common work, you 
are not obliged to ; perhaps 
you'd better though. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York. 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 

36 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 



Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 Wellington street, MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERWE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT, 

Manufacturers of 

Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tabes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulirtlMfcBjjjjjr-^achinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



a few weeks ago. Some future orders have 
been booked again this week. 

Green Wire Cloth — The price of green 
wire cloth has been reduced to $1.35 per 
100 sq. ft. Some spring business is being 
done. 

Freezers — Ice cream freezers are meet- 
ing with more attention this week. 

Screws — The discounts have been raised 
S per cent, on bright and 2 l /£ per 
cent on brass screws. Discounts are 
as follows : Flat head bright, 85 per 
cent, off list; round head bright, 80 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 77% percent. ; round 
head brass, 70 per cent. 

Bolts — There has been no change made 
in the prices of bolts, and a fair trade 
continues. Discounts are : Carriage bolts, 
65 per cent. ; machine bolts, 65 per cent. ; 
coach screws, 75 per cent.; sleigh shoe 
bolts, 75 per cent. ; bolt ends, 65 per cent.; 
plough bolts, 50 per cent.; square nuts, 
4>£c. per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 4^c 
per lb. off list; tire bolts, 67 yi per cent.; 
stove bolts, 67 yi percent. 

Building Paper — Spring orders in 
building paper are now being booked. We 
quote : Dry sheathing, 30c. per roll ; 
cyclone dry do., 42c. per roll ; straw do., 
30c; heavy straw do., $1.40 per 100 lb.; 
I.X.L., dry sheathing, 65c. per roll ; 
cyclone, tarred do., 50c. per roll ; tarred 
ordinary do., 40c. per roll ; tarred felt, 
$1.60 per 100 lb.; ready roofing, 2 ply, 75c. 
per roll ; 3-ply, Si per roll. 

Rivets — There is nothing new to note. 
The discount on best iron rivets, section, car- 
riage, and wagon box, black rivets, tinned 
do., coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off; copper rivets, 35 
and 5 per cent, off; and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5 -lb. carton boxes, are quoted 
at 60 and 10 per cent, off list. 

Cordage — The tone of the market now 
seems to be steady. Manila is quoted at 
I 3/4c. per lb. for 7-16 and larger; sisal is 
worth gy£c. per lb. for 7-16 and larger, and 
lathyarn 9c. per lb. 

Spades and Shovels — Business is of 
small proportions in this line. Discounts 
are 40 and 5 per cent. 

Tacks — Prices remain as befor< 
quote : Carpet tacks, in dozens and bulk, 
blued, 80 and 5 per cent, discount; tinned, 
80 and 10 per cent. ; cut tacks, blued, in 
dozens, 75 and 15 per cent, discount. 

Firebricks — Very little trading is being 
done in this line. The price is $18.50 to 
$26, as to brand. 

Cement — A small trade is passing. We 
quote: German, $2. 50 to $2.65; English, 
$2.40 to $2.50; Belgian, $1.90 to $2.15 
per bbl. 



S ANDERSON'S STEEL 



THE BEST FOR 



Tools, Drills, 
Dies, etc. 

LARGE ASSORTMENT IN STOCK. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO, 

Canadian Agents, 

MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

We have in stock 

PIG TIN 
INGOT COPPER 
LAKE COPPER 
PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Co. 



"i(E«r-e 



Limited 



LASBOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron ' 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



We wish you all a Happy and Prosper= 
ous New Year. 

To start the new century well nothing could be more 
appropriate than a cabinet of our 

ELASTILITE VARNISH 

For Inside or Outside Use. 

13 f=^ 




The above cuts represent a front and back view of show can. 



Manufactured only by 



S Imperial Varnisti & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 

Large new stock of all leading lines. 



Headquarters for 

Linseed Oil 
Paints 

Window Glass 
Building Paper 
Harvest Tools 



Screen Doors 
Lawn Mowers 
Cordage 
Paris Green 
Etc. 



Also large and full assortment of 

CUTLERY 



of all leading manufacturers. 



V[RTAI-S 

The metal market is steady, but there is 
little business being done as dealers are 
busy taking stock. 

Pig Iron — Some sales have been made 
this week at unchanged figures. Canadian 
pig is worth $18 to $20, and Summerlee $24 
to $25. 

Bar Iron — The feeling is towards 
stationary prices. The ruling price is $1.65 
to $1.70 per 100 lb. 

Black Sheets — There is but small in- 
quiry for this article. The base price is 
$2. 80 for 8 to 16 gauge. 

Galvanized Iron — Quite a few addi- 
tional spring orders have been booked in 
galvanized iron this week. We quote for 
immediate delivery : No. 28 Queen's 
Head, $4.70 to #5 ; Apollo, 10^ oz., 
#4.70 to $5, and Comet, No. 28, $4. 30 to 

$4-55- 

Ingot Copper — The price is unchanged 
at i7J^c. 

Ingot Tin — Foreign markets continue 
weak and Lamb and Flag is worth 33c. in 
the local market. 

Lead — Small lots are selling at $4.65. 

Lead Pipe — Trade is not active in this 
line. We quote : 7c. for ordinary and 
7j£c. for composition waste, with 15 per 
cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — Trade continues of fair 



dimensions. We hear that the ruling prices 
on galvanized pipe are below our schedule. 
We quote as follows : Black pipe, %, $2.80 
per 100 ft.; y%, $2.80; %, $2.85; tf, $3-05; 
i-in., $4.35; i#.#5-95: i#. $7-io; 2-in., 
$9,150. Galvanized, %, $4.90; #, #5.40; 
i-in., $7.35 ; i#, $9.75; ij£, $".70; 2- 
in., $15.75- 

Tinplates — Inquiries are few with prices 
unchanged at $4.50 for coke and $4.75 for 
charcoal. 

Canada Plate — Some movement is 
noticeable this week. We quote as follows : 
52's, $2.90; 6o's, $3; 75's, $3.10; full 
polished, $3.75, and galvanized, $4.60. 

Tool Steel— We quote: Black Diamond, 
8c; Jessop's 12c. 

Steel — No change. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, $1.85 ; tire, $1.95 ; spring, $2.75 ; 
machinery, $2.75 and toe-calk, $2.50. 

Terne Plates — Business is at a stand- 
still in this line. We quote $8.25. 

Swedish Iron — Steady at $4.25. 

Coil Chain — The price remains un- 
changed. The spring business has not 
opened up well with the retailers yet. We 
quote: No. 6, 11 J^c; No. 5,ioc.;No.4,9J£c; 
No. 3, 9c; j^-inch, l%c per lb.; 5-16, 
$4.60; 5-16 exact, $5.10; ft, $4-20; 7-16, 

$400; %, $3-75; 9- 10 - $3-65; H< $3-35; 

&\$3- 2 5; #.$3>2o; i-in., $3.15. 



Sheet Zinc — Values are steady at 6 to 
6#c. 

Antimony — Unchanged, at 10c. 

GLASS. 

The demand is very light. We quote : 

First break, $2; second, $2.10 for 50 

feet; first break, 100 feet, $3.80; 

second, $4 ; third, $4.50; fourth, $4.75; 

fifth, $5.25; sixth, $5.75, and seventh, 

$6.25. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Turpentine is a little stronger in the 
Southern markets, but not sufficiently so to 
warrant an advance here this week. Should 
the firmness be maintained, in alf probability 
there will be a slight appreciation in value 
of turpentine within the next few days. No 
change of moment is taking place in linseed 
oil, which continues in fair inquiry. 
General business has been tolerably brisk 
during the week, and the midwinter slug- 
gishness generally experienced seems to be 
absent this season. The majority of groups 
of travellers are busily engaged preparing 
for their early spring trips. White lead is 
25c. higher, and the quotations for Paris 
green are now published. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, $6.75 ; No. i, $6 37^ ; No. 2, 
$6 ; No. 3, $5 62^, and No. 4, $5 25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 
or four months. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



Dry White Lead — #5.75 in casks; 
kegs, $6. 

Red Lead — Casks, $5.50; in kegs, 
*5-75- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
I, 6>£c. ; in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7%c. 

Putty — We quote : Bulk, in barrels, 
$2 per 100 lb ; bulk, in less quantity, $2.15; 
bladders, in barrels, $2 20 ; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, $2.35; in tins, 
#2.45 to $2.75 ; in less than 100 lb. lots, 
$3 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 80c; boiled, 83c, 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic. less, 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and O^hawaat 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

Turpentine — Single bbls., 59c; 2 to 4 
bbls., 58c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — $1.25 to $1.4$ per gal. 

Castor Oil — 8^ to 9#c. in wholesale 
lots, and %c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47^ to 49 c. 

Cod Oir. — 32%, to 35c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
$2.75 to $4. 50, as to brand ; coal tar, $3.25 
to S3. 75 ; cotton waste, 4% to SJS^c. for 
colored, and 6 to 7%c. for white ; oakum, 
S l A to 6%c, and cotton oakum, 10 to lie. 

Paris Green — Petroleum barrels, i6^c. 
per lb. ; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, 17 %c ; 25-lb. drums, 18c; i-lb. 
packages, i8j£ c; %-\b. packages, 20^ c; 
1 lb. tins, I9>£c.; J^-lb. tins, 2i^c. f.o.b. 
Montreal; terms 3 percent. 30 days, or four 
months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The tone of the scrap metal market is 
steady with goods scarce. Dealers 
are paying the following prices in 
the country : Heavy copper and wire, 
13 to i3#c. per lb. ; light copper, 
12c. ; heavy brass, 12c; heavy yellow, 
%% to 9c; light brass, 6% to 
7c; lead, 2^ to 3c. per lb.; zinc, 2% to 
2%c; iron, No. 1 wrought, $13 to $ 14 per 
gross ton ; No. 1 cast, #13 to $14 ; stove 
plate, $& to $9; light iron, No. 2, #4 a ton; 
malleable and steel, $4. 

PETROLEUM. 

This midwinter necessity continues to go 
out freely. We quote: "Silver Star," 15 to 
16c. ; "Imperial Acme," i6>£ to iTyic. ; 
" S.C. Acme," 18 to 19c, and "Pratt's 
Astral," 19 to 20c. 

HIDES. 

Green hides are lower in sympathy with 
the decline in the United States. The 
demand for hides is improved. We quote : 
Light hides, 7%c. for No. 1 ; 6^c. for 



Our Metallic Cornices l^ZS&S*"**"- 




They are light in weight, convenient to handle, easy to apply, and offer 
fireproof protection, at the same time being ornamentally artistic. Made in 
many beautiful designs and thoroughly economical. 

They're an important fearure of all up-to-date buildings. Progressive 
builders realize their superiority. 

In addition to our stock designs, we make to order, any size, shape, or 
pattern required. 

METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited, ™- Toronto. 

Wholesale Manufacturers. 



No. 2. and $%c. for No. 3. Lambskins, 
90c. 



MONTREAL NOTES. 

White lead is advanced 25c. per 100 lb. 

A new price list is out on galvanized 
wire. 

The discounts on screws have been 
raised. 

Green wire cloth has been reduced 15c. 
per 100 sq. ft. 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 11, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

TRADE is gradually recovering from its 
holiday quietude. The travellers are 
again on the road, and the orders 
they have been sending in during the last 
few days appear to be, on the whole, rather 
better than expected. There has also been 
quite a nice complement of letter orders. 
No apparent improvement is shown in the 
demand for nails. Fence wires are still 
not wanted for immediate shipment, and but 
few orders are being booked for future 
delivery. Some orders are being booked 
n poultry netting for future shipment. The 
same is to be said in regard to green wire 
cloth. Quite a few orders have been re- 
ceived during the week for such small 
goods as tacks, shoe nails and shoe rivets. A 
fair trade is to be noted in rules and other 
lines of carpenters' tools. A nice trade is 
opening up in milk can trimmings. The 
week has witnessed a number of changes in 
prices, the most important of which is a 
reduction in wood screws. Stovepipes are 
$1 per ioo lengths lower, and elbows show 
a reduction of 40c. Lower prices also rule 
on Gilmour's augers and auger bits. White 



lead, on the other hand, is 25c. per 100 lb. 
higher. 

Barb Wire — Business is practically nil, 
for future as well as for present delivery. 
We quote $2,97% f.o.b. Cleveland for less 
than carlots, and $2.85 in carlots. From 
stock, Toronto, $3 10 per 100 lb. 

Galvanized Wire — There is nothing 
scarcely doing. We still quote No. 9 at 
#3.10, Toronto. The base price f.o.b. 
Cleveland is still $2 72 x / z per 100 lb. 

Smooth Steel Wire — A small business 
only is being done in both oiled and an- 
nealed and hay-baling wire. Base price is 
unchanged at $2.80 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Trade is still quiet and 
without any apparent improvement. The 
manufacturers, after a session of several 
days, decided to make no change in price. 
Base price is still, therefore, $2.85 per keg 
for less than carlots and $2.75 for carlots. 

Cut Nails— These are dull and feature- 
less, with the base price still at $2.35 per 
kee. 

Horseshoes — Busines is moderate and 
without special feature. We quote as follows 
f.o.b. Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, light, medium and heavy, $3.60 ; 
snow shoes, #3.85 ; light steel shoes, $3.70; 
featherweight (all sizes), $4.95 ; iron shoes, 
No. 1 and smaller, light, medium and 
heavy (all sizes), #3.85 ; snow shoes, #4 ; 
light steel shoes, #3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4 .95. 

Horse Nails— Quiet and unchanged. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on standard oval 
head and 50 and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Screws — Prices are lower on wood 
screws by about 20 per cent., the manu- 
facturers having decided upon a reduction 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



shortly after we went to press last week. 
The reduction is in sympathy with a decline 
in the v Unitejd Stat£s^market,, where the 
association has dissolves ^Jie.pool owing to 
outside competition. We now quote %'Flat * 
head bright, 85 per cent, off the list; rotrnd 
head bright, 80 per cent. ; flat head brass, 
77 X A P« r cent - ; round head brass, 70 per 
cent. ; flat head bronze, 70 per cent.; 
round head bronze, 65 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — Trade is just fair and 
without any particular feature. We quote 
as follows : Carriage bolts (Norway), 
full square, 70 per cent.; carriage bolts, 
fulls quare, 70 per cent. ; common carriage 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; coach screws, 
75 per cent.; sleighshoe bolts, 75 per cent.; 
blank bolts, 65 per cent. ; bolt ends, 65 per 
cent. ; nuts, square, 4^c. off; nuts, hexagon, 
4Vc off; tire bolts, 67 # per cent.; stove 
bolts, 67 >£ ; plough bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rivets and Burrs — These are dull. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on iron rivets; 
iron burrs, 55 per cent.; copper rivets and 
burrs, 35 and 5 per cent. 

Rope — Business is still light. The hemp 
market is fairly firm, but the manufacturers 
in the United States are disinclined to pay 
present prices. We quote : Sisal, 9c. per lb. 
base, and manila, 13c. Cotton rope is un- 
changed as follows: 3- 16 in. and larger, 
i6^c; 5-32 in., 2i^c^, and y % in., 22j£c. 
per lb. 

Cutlery — The quietness which settled 
down in this line of trade after the holidays 
still obtains. 

Sporting Goods — Only small quantities 
are going out. 

Building Paper — Business is quiet. 
Ready roofing, 3-ply, $1.65 per square ; ■ 
ditto, 2 ply, $ 1. 40 per square. Quotations 
aref.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 

Gilmour's Augers and Auger Bits — 
These are lower in price. Fuller particulars 
will be found on our editorial pages. 

Green Wire Cloth — Prices have been 
reduced 15c. per 100 lb., the quotation now 
being $1.35 per 100 sq. ft. A fairly good 
trade is being done for spring delivery. 

Skates — While trade is not active it is 
fair, and stocks in jobbers' hands are get- 
ting fairly well reduced. 

Harvest Tools — There is a great deal 
of hesitancy on the part of the retail trade to 
place orders for future delivery. Discounts 
50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Poultry Netting — A fair number of 
orders are being booked for spring delivery. 
Discount off the Canadian list is still 50 per 
cent. 

Enamelled Ware — Very little business 
is being done. 



Tinware — There is a little movement in 
tinware, particularly in milk can trimmings. 

Stovepipes — Prices have been reduced 
$1, the quotations now being as follows : 
5 and 6 in., $y pefMoo lengths, and 7 in., 
S7.50 per 100 length.. It is about a year 
since the last change was made. 

Elbows— The agreernent in regard to 
the price of stovepipe elbows has been 
dissolved and lower prices rule. No. 1 are 
now quoted at $1.40, and No. 2 at $1.20 
per dozen. 

Stoves and Furnaces— Very little is 
being done in stoves and practically nothing 
in furnaces. 

Cement — The season is over. We nomin- 
ally quote in barrel lots : Canadian Port- 
land, $2.80 to $3; Belgian, $2.75 to 53; 
English do., $3 ; Canadian hydraulic 
cements, 51.25 to $1.50; calcined plaster, 
51.90 ; asbestos cement, $2.50 per bbl. 

METALS. 

A slight improvement has taken place in 
the demand for metals, but the volume of 
business is still light. 

Pig Iron — There is not much doing. For 
small quantities of pig iron the Ontario 
furnaces are quoting 518 per ton. 

Bar Iron — The demand is fairly good 
with 51.70 as the ruling base price. 

Pig Tin — The outside markets are quiet 
and lower, particularly in London. Locally 
the demand is fair for small quantities at 
32 to 33c. 

Tinplates — While the movement is not 
large, it is fair for this time of the year. 

Tinned Iron — Some fairly good ship- 
ments have been made dbring the past week 
on cheese factory account. 

Terne Plates — There has been a little 
better movement in this line during the past 
week. 

Black Sheets — The demand is fair. 
We quote 53- 50 per 100 lb. 

Galvanized Sheets —While the demand 
is better than it was. trade is not yet active. 
We quote English at $4.8$ and American at 
54.50 for ordinary quantities. 

Canada Plates — A little movement is 
still to be noted in them. We quote : 
All dull, 53 15 ; half and half, 53.25 ; 
and all bright, 53.85 to 54. 

Iron Pipe — Trade keeps fair in this line. 
We quote as follows: Black pipe % in., 
53.00; y% in., 53 00 ; y t in., 53-°°; % 
in., 53.30; 1 in., 5450; 1% in., 56.25 ; 
i^in., 57.75; 2 m " 510.40. Galvanized 
pipe is as follows: yi in., $4.50; }{ ' n M 
55; 1 in., $7; 1% in., 59-5°: ! ^ in -. 

5u.7S; 2 »"--. $*$ 75- 

Solder — The demand is good. We 
quote half-and half, 19 to 20c; refined, 19c. 

Lead — A moderate demand is to be 
noted. We quote 4^ to 5c. 

Copper — Business is quiet in both sheet 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 




^COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

YANKEE SNAPS. 

Made in all styles and sizes. 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'5QL1PPER5| 

^t-eS '^f lja S^ Varied. 
flEAr" 1 ^"- s'/l Toilet, Band, Electric Power| 

'are the best. 

Higheat Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machine!. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB CATALOG m TO 
tw.rlaaa Sb..r»v Wfr. Co.. Raabna. W.H..VS* 





The Best Door Closer Is 

Newman's Invincible Floor Spring. 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of 
wind. Has many working advantages over the or- 
dinary spring, and has twice the wear. In use 
throughout Great Britain and the Colonies, (lives 
perfection. MADE ONLY BY 
W. NEWMAN & SONS, Hospital St , Birmingham. 



BURMAN & SONS', LIMITED cuppIrs 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Russia's Stables and Fie'd Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 
BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont 



Pullman Sash Balance Co, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester. N.Y.. U.S.A. 

On aale all round tbe globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



28 



and ingot copper. We quote : Ingot, 19 to 
20c; bolt or bar, 23^ to 25c; sheet, 23 to 
23'Ac. 

Brass — The demand is fair. Discount 
on rod and sheet 15 per cent. 

Zinc Spelter — Very little business is 
being done. We quote 16 to i6#c. per lb. 

Sheet Zinc — In this line the demand 
has been fair during the past week. We 
quote casks at $6.75 to $7, and part casks 
at $7 to #7.50 per 100 lb. 

Antimony — A good trade is to be 
reported this week. We quote 11 to 1 1 }£c. 
per lb. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

There is some improvement in the de- 
mand but the movement is still light. 
Orders for linseed oil for spring delivery 
are coming in well, as it is expected that a 
firm market will be found when the spring 
trade begins. Turpentine has advanced 
2c. here, and is steady at the higher figure. 
White lead was advanced 25c. for all grades 
this week. This was unexpected, as at a 
meeting of the manufacturers a few days 
ago the matter was considered and no 
change was made. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6 Sj%; No. 1, #6.50; No. 2. $6.12^; 
No. 3, $5 75; No. 4, $5.37 '^; dry white lead 
in casks, $6. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $5 to $5.25 ; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb. ; $5.25 to $5.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 7 to 7#c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 8 to 8^c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7 .25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.20; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.35; bulk in bbls., 
J 2 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 lb., 
$215; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $3. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1.20 to $1.30 per 
gal.; -No. 1 quality, $1 per gal. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 to 
\o]/ z z. per lb. and xoyi. to 11c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 80c; 
boiled, 84c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 79c; 
boiled, 83c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 59c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 58c, to all points in Ontario. 



84,000 Daily Production. 
5 Factories. 5 Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sale all 
over the World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70% of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 

Established 1773 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 
or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 
Designs on application. 
Works: Ravenhcad, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : 107 Cannon Street. London E.C — r28 Hope Slreet, Glas- 
gow — 12 East P.t. de, Leeds, and 36 Par dise Street, Birmingham Ttlegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens." 
Telephone No. 63 St. Helens. 

G LA ZIERS DIA IV1 N DS '" ReUabieToola at low prices. 




A. SHAW & SON, 52 Rahere St., Goswell Rd„ London, E.C. Eng. The oldest house in the 
trade, lineal successors of the inventor and patentee, J. SHAW. 



For less quantities than barrels, 5c. per 
gallon extra will be added, and for 5 -gallon 
packages, 50c, and 10 gallon packages, 
80c. will be charged. 

GLASS. 

There is not much doing, and there is 
little indication of an immediate advance. 
We still quote first break locally : Star, 
in 50-foot boxes, $2.10, and 100-foot 
boxes, $4; doublediamond under 26 united 
inches, $6, Toronto, Hamilton and Lon. 
don; terms 4 months or 3 per cent. 30 days. 
OLD MATERIAL 

A strong feeling is manifested, but prices 
are unchanged. Delivery is moderate. We 
quote jobbers' prices as follows: Agricultural 
scrap, 55c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 55c. 
per cwt. ; stove cast, 40c. ; No. 1 wrought 
55c. per 100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, io^c. ; heavy 
copper, i2yic. ; coil wire scrap, 13c. ; 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10 to 
io^c; heavy red brass, io^c. ; scrap 
lead, 3c. ; zinc, 2j£c ; scrap rubber, 7c; 
good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c; clean 
dry bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 

ff.OS*. "JKIN8 AND WOO). 

Hides — Prices are steady with little 
doing. We quote as follows : Cow- 
hides, No. i,7%c. ; No. 2, 6%"c. ; No. 3, 
5^c. Steer hides are worth ic. more. 
Cured hides are quoted at &%c. 

Skins — The market is dull with 
prices unchanged throughout. We quote as 
follows: No. 1 veal, 8-lb. and up, 8c. per 
lb.; No. 2, 7c; dekins, from 40 to 60c. 
culls, 20 to 25c. Sheep are selling at 90 
to 95c. 

Wool — A decline of ic. is noted. The 
market is listless. We quote as follows : 
Combing fleece, 15 to 16c, and unwashed, 
9^ to 10c. 



PETROLEUM. 

An advance of ^Jc, is noted throughout. 
There is a good movement. \ We quote 
as follows: Pratt's Astral, 17 |to I7^c. 
in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; Ameri- 
can water white, 17 to I7^c. in barrels ; 
Photogene, i6j£ to 17c; Sarnia water 
white, 16 to i6j£c. in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, 15 to i5^c. in barrels. 

COAL. 

A good movement continues, but not as 
large as would be the case if more cars could 
be had. Prices are unchanged. We quote 
anthracite on cars Buffalo and bridges : 
Grate, $4.75 per gross ton and #4.24 per 
net ton ; egg, stove and nut, #5 per gross 
ton and $4. .46 per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Pig tin is ic. per lb. lower. 

Petroleum is ^c. per gal. dearer. 

Turpentine has advanced 2c. per gal. 

White lead is 25c. per 100 lb. higher. 

Gilmour's augers and auger bits are 
cheaper. 

Wood screws are quoted about 20 per 
cent, lower. 

Green wire cloth has been reduced 15c. 
per 100 square feet. 

Stovepipes are $1 per 100 lengths 
cheaper, and stovepipe elbows are quoted 
40c. per doz. lower. 



The outlook for export for pig iron, billets 
and all cruder forms is decidedly discour- 
aging. It will take the foreigners some 
time to get over their scare, until they 
realize that the market here has changed. 
The financial situation is unfavorable, 
notably in Germany, and prices abroad 
have come down with a run. For some 
months deliveries on old orders will go for- 
ward, but then, unless there are new 
developments, we may expect a sharp 
decline.— Iron Age. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, January 7, 1900. 

THE demand for all lines of shelf and 
heavy hardware, and paints and oils, 
is light indeed, practically nothing 
being done. The staffs of the various 
houses are chiefly employed in clearing the 
remnants of last year's business preparatory 
to stock-taking. 

Price list for the week is as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 75 

Plain twist 3 75 

Staples 4 25 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

" ri 4 00 

12 4 05 

13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 \ 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 45 

16 and 20 3 5° 

10 3 55 

8 365 

6 370 

4 385 

3 4 10 

Cut nails, 30tobo<iy 300 

20 to 40 3 05 

10 to 16 3 10 

8 3 15 

6 3 20 

4 3 30 

3 3 65 

Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No r 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 bs 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 5 15 

No. 2 and larger 4 9° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 520 

No. 2 and larger 4 95 

Bar iron, $2.50 basis. 
Swedish iron, $4.50 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 00 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, ro to 20 gauge, roo lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb . . , 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 1475 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18x21 and 18 x 24 3 90 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch ... .50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over 2 inch 45 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $10 00 

ft 10 50 

" % and 5-16 11 00 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 13 50 

" H 14 00 

" % and 5-16 1450 

Solder 22 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17^ 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 p.c. 

Flat ' ' brass 70 p c. 

Round " " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57'A p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 42 'A p.c. 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 50c. lb. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 5°. and 10 p.c. 



Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 • 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley 's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

American, M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 75 

Chilled 7 50 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



PETROLEUM. 



Water white American 
Prime white Ametican. 
Water white Canadian . 
Prime white Canadian. 



24KC. 
23c 
2ic. 
19c 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 



Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 74 

Less than barrel lots 79 

Linseed oil, raw 87 

Boiled 90 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 25 & 

Eldorado engine 24M 

Atlantic red 27% 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23K to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. 11 M 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 . 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 to 50 5 50 

51 to6o 6 00 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2K 

kegs " 2% 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 25 

No 1 7 00 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color . . per gal. $1 . 30 to $1 . 90 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

A PRETTY CALENDAR. 

£. K. Spinney, iron and hardware 
merchant, Yarmouth, N.S., has sent us one 
of the prettiest calendars of the season. It 
depicts a sailor-suited girl sitting on a rock 
on the wild sea shore, and she is beautiful 
enough to attract every eye within range to 
the notice that E. K. Spinney sells iron and 
hardware, is agent for several fire and 
marine insurance companies and for the 
White Star Line and Dominion Line S.S. 
Cos. The object of the calendar is thus 
accomplished. The calendar itself is large 
and clear, and has been printed with appro- 
priate notices on each sheet. 

a bank's calendar. 

The Royal Bank of Canada, Montreal, is 
distributing a useful and attractive calendar 
for the current year. This bank has 
developed rapidly in the last few years, and 
now has branches in all the principal 
centres in Canada. The calendar is one 
worth having, and no doubt any of our 
readers sending a post card with the request 
for one will get it. 



DEMAND FOR BOOK AND BROOM 
WIRE. 

The Peerless Wire Co., Hamilton, has 
recently received large orders for book and 
broom wire. Owing to the pressure of 
business the company is considering the 
advisability of running its mill night as well 
as day. This company, it will be re- 
membered, makes a specialty of broom and 
book wire. 



The sheriff's sale of the realty of C. 
Locke & Co., general merchants and fish 
dealers, Lockeport, N.S., is advertised for 
January 16. 



"Anchor" Liquid House Paint. 

Before placing order buyers should get quotations for "Anchor" 
Brand, as there is no better ready-mixed paint in the market. 

It is made from the very best materials, giving maximum body, 
and dries hard with great durability. 

" Anchor" Liquid House Paint is made in a large selection of 
shades for body colors, trimmings, roofs and floors. 

Having made this Paint for over 20 years, we can warrant it to 
give satisfaction to the consumer. 

There are higher-priced paints on the market, but none are 

better than the " Anchor " Brand. 

Sample cards and quotations on application. 



HENDERSON & POTTS 

Manufacturers, 

HALIFAX and MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 25 

41 



TO THE * « 

CANADIAN 

flERCHANTS 




ij£ <e5* «<JS» 

Your prosperity goes hand-in-hand with the increased 
use of our productions, so we wish you all the good wishes 
of the season. Don't forget that of the best Paints, Lead, 
Varnishes, Coach Colors in Japan, Pure Colors in 
Oil, the old firm of P. D, Dods & Co, are the manu- 
facturers. Their brand of u Island City" on the package 
is a guarantee of quality and that they are not surpassed 
by the product of any other Paint manufacturer. This 
firm abhors combines and intends to offer its productions on 
merit and value. The best goods in these lines are the 
cheapest and most durable. All kinds of Glass, Oil, 
Brushes and Painters' and Decorators' Supplies and 
Finishes always in stock. Insist upon getting the "Island 
City" goods and take no others. The best line of Paint 
goods for merchants to handle. Catalogues and color sam- 
ple cards on application to dealers in this line. 



P. D. DODS Sl CO. 

HALIFAX, TORONTO, , , MOMTPPftl 

WINNIPEG, VICTORIA. m\JM* I rtC*%L.. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



EXPLOSION OF GAS METERS. 

THE following communication from 
J. A. Painchaud, Montreal, com- 
menting on the article on " Explo- 
sion of Gas Meters," in The Metal Worker 
of December 22, appeared in that journal 
on January 5 : 

"The statement of W. R. Park, relating 
to the particulars of gas meter explosion, 
clearly shows how exceedingly dangerous 
it is to have a mixture of air and illumin- 
ating gas, a fortiori acetylene, in a recep- 
tacle. It seems to me that the sooner 
acetylene gas generator manufacturers 
realize that only absolutely airless acetylene 
will afford absolute security and adopt some 
means of avoiding any possible admission 
of air into the system, the better it would 
be for the public and the acetylene industry. 
It would not take many reports of accidents 
similar to what happened at a ball in Aix- 
en Othe, France, where several lives were 
lost through an acetylene explosion, due to 
the meddling with the acetylene apparatus 
by a couple of ignorant guests, to cripple 
this promising industry for many years. 
As a true friend of acetylene, I believe that 
people should be made aware of the possible 
dangers of this illuminant. From a report 
made by an insurance inspector to me not 
long ago, of a generator manufacturer in 
the West, who tried to accelerate the 
emptying of acetylene from his apparatus 
in the inspector's presence by the same 
means as mentioned by Mr. Park, with the 
result of an explosion which fortunately did 
no more than frighten them, some generator 
manufacturers also need advice on this 
subject. A flame should never be applied 
to acetylene issuing from any opening 
except from proper burners. Plumbers, 
who are more liable than others to forget 
this in looking for leaks, should be made to 
understand it." 



PROSPECTS ARE BRIGHT FOR 
WINNIPEG. 

The outlook for the plumbing and heating 
trade in Winnipeg seems good, as several 
large contracts are being considered. The 
Bank of Hamilton intend making a 2 5 x 1 20 
ft. addition, the same height as their present 
premises, to cost about $50,000. The new 
Y.M.C.A. building, to be two storeys high 
and to provide for four large stores, is to 
be started by W. F. Alloway and D. E. 
Sprague early next spring. John Leslie, 
furniture dealer, Main street, proposes ex- 
pending $15,000 on alterations. The Lake 



of the Woods Milling Co. are having plans 
prepared for a new office building on Mc- 
Dermot street, to cost about $35,000. A 
syndicate of business men have decided to 
erect a large block for mercantile offices on 
the northwest corner of Arthur and Mc- 
Dermot streets. G. Olson, flour and feed 
dealer, King street, intends erecting a brick 
building near his present premises, to cost 
$20,000. Plans have also been prepared 
for many smaller business houses and 
residences. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Geo. A. Wooten & Co. have started as 
plumbers in Halifax. 

Lindsay, Ont., voted in favor of munici- 
pal ownership of the electric light plant. 

Thorold, Ont., carried, by a majority of 
16, a by-law in favor of installing water- 
works, on Monday. 

Chas. H. Coursolles, who has been doing 
business in Ottawa as an electrician under 
the style of Cote & Coursolles, has started 
to do business under his own name. 

On Monday, Parry Sound, Ont., voted 
on two by laws, one for $29,500 for the 
purchase of an electric light plant and 
extension and improvements of waterworks 
system, and the other for $2, 500 for the con- 
struction of a steel bridge across Seguin 
river. Both by-laws were carried. 

The employes and friends of Purdy, 
Mansell & Co., plumbers, Toronto, intend 
holding their annual supper on Friday of 
next week at the Morris House, Lambton 
Mills. The party will leave Purdy, Man- 
sell & Co.'s at 8 o'clock p.m., and proceed 
by carriage to the hotel. A big time is 
anticipated. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

The council of St. Patrick's Home, 
Ottawa, propose erecting a new wing, to 
comprise a children's dormitory, lecture 
hall and chapel next spring. 

Saxe & Archibald, architects, Montreal, 
will soon invite tenders for work on the 
Bellevue Building, St. Catherine street, 
Montreal, which M. S. Foley is erecting. 

Permits have been issued in Toronto to 
L. J. Greenway for a two-storey and attic 
residence on Pearson street, near Ronces- 
valles avenue, to cost $1,800, and to the 
Macpherson estate (J. N. Townsend, 
architect) for a brick residence on the north 
side of Crescent road to cost $4,000. 



A. F. Dunlop, architect, Montreal, is 
preparing plans for a front addition of 
marble 63 ft. and five additional storeys to 
the St. James street side of the Carsely ' 
departmental store, Montreal. A main 
feature of the new building will be one 
large entrance from St. James street, the 
vestibule to be very spacious, and the 
surroundings quite imposing in appearance. 
There will be two new rapid elevators, and 
a separate one from the basement to the 
kitchen, for restaurant work. The plans 
include a restaurant on the last storey. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

The John Ritchie Plumbing and Heating 
Co., Limited, Toronto, have the contract 
for alterations to the plumbing and heating 
of the addition to the Grand Union Hotel, 
Toronto. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Wm. Poison, president of the Poison 
Iron Works, shipbuilders and engine manu- 
facturers, Toronto, died at his home, 102 
Pembroke street, Toronto, on Tuesday. 

Mr. Geo. F. Stephens, senior partner of 
the well-known jobbing firm, Messrs. G. F. 
Stephens & Co., Winnipeg, was in Montreal 
during the week visiting the different 
paint factories. 

On Saturday morning of last week J. T. 
Peacock, of the James Morrison Brass Mfg. 
Co., Toronto, was presented with a hand- 
some portmanteau by his fellow employes. 
Mr. Peacock is leaving the James Morrison 
Company to take an agency of the Canada 
Life Assurance Company at Port Hope, 
Ont. 



It is understood that one of the largest 
locomotive manufacturing firms in the 
United States has decided to establish a 
branch at Sydney, Cape Breton. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^ 

Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE 



20th Century Nail Pullers 



WE MAKE 5 STYLES. 
WE MAKE 5 GRADES. 
THE GREEN BOOK TELLS THE STORV 

SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Utica 




DropTorgfe&T 



ool Co., 296 Broadway, New York City. 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



KNOX HENRY 



Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 220% Board of Trade. MONTREAL. 




HORSE NAILS — "C" Brand Horse Nails - 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 
"BRASSITE" GOODS — Gunn Castor Co, 

Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 




Manufacturers ol 

Heating 
Supplies 

Pipe Fittings and Headers. 
Large Manifolds made to Order. 
Steam Traps and Appliances, etc. 



The 



Jas. Morrison Brass 

Mfg. CO., Limited 

— TORONTO. 



FIXING-UP TIME 

follows stocktaking and is the best time to put in 




BENNETTS PATENT SHELF BOX 

and the 

KLONDIKE SAMPLE HOLDER. 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., Toronto. 

N.B. -Don't forget we make boxes to fit your pre- 
sent shelving. 






WIRE RODS ! ■+ ■ 

Drawn to Decimal Sizes, Cut and Straightened, 
In Uniform Sizes. Prompt Shipment. 



Chalcraft Screw Co., Limited, Brantford, Ont. 

THE ADAMS STOVE PIPE REGISTER. 




Design Patented 
June 29, 1897. 

Design Patented 
August 31, 1897. 



Made by 

The Adams 
Company 

Dubuque, 
Iowa, U.S-A. 




LEADER CHURN 

New Century Improvements. 

FOUR DIFFERENT STYLES: 

A— Steel Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
B— Wood Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
C— Steel Frame with Crank. 
D— Wood Frame with Crank. 

Styles A and B may be operated from a sitting 
or standing position. 



Steel Frames and Hoops beautifully ALUMINIZED. 

All LEADER CHURNSare equipped with BICYCLE BALL 
BEARINGS and PATENTED CREAM BREAKERS. 

Stands are so constructed that they are particularly strong 
and rigid, and there is nothing to interfere with the 
placing of pail in the most convenient position for drain- 
ing off buttermilk. 

It Pays to Have the Best. None are BetterThan the Leader. 

THE ^ 

Dowswell Manufacturing Co. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents: W. L. Haldimand & Son, Montreal, Que. 

MATTRESS AND BROOM WIRE 

Uniform Size and Temper Guaranteed. 




HIGH GRADE, 
DOUBLE 
TINNED 



Fine Annealed Brush and Market Wire, 

TINNED WIRE OF ALL KINDS. 

SAMPLES AND QUOTATIONS SENT ON APPLICATION. 



The Peerless Wire Co., - Hamilton 



28 



CANApiANa^ARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER" TH 

day s move in the ot 



MANUFACTURED IRON AND STEEL IN 
ENGLAND. 

IN the finished branches of the trade an 
improvement was hardly to be expected 
at holiday time, and the depression 
which has now prevailed for some weeks 
past shows no diminution. Business has, 
of course, been on a very small scale dur- 
ing the past week, and there have been 
some further reductions. In South Stafford- 
shire marked bars still command ,£io ios., 
although that price is sometimes not 
obtained without difficulty, but common 
bars have been reduced to ^8. A good 
deal is heard of American competition in 
South Wales and Scotland. Several cargoes 
from the United States are reported to be 
on their way over, and some orders for 
which British firms have been competing 
have apparently been placed across the 
Atlantic instead of in this country. At the 
same time a good many rumors are abroad 
as to the shutting down of iron works in 
this country, but many of them are unre- 
liable, and the general situation is not so 
bad as these alarmist reports would make 
it seem to be. — Iron and Coal Trades 
Review. 

PIG IRON IN GREAT BRITAIN. 
The pig iron market has remained very 
quiet during the past week, and the Christ- 
mas holidays have reduced business to a 
very small compass. Although prices con- 
tinue to show signs of weakness, no further 
reduction of any consequence has taken 
place. As we pointed out last week, the 
pig iron position is by no means so unsatis- 
factory as might be hastily assumed at first 
sight from the comparatively low rates now 
quoted. The fall in the price of coke, 
exceeding that of pig iron, the low stocks, 
and the better demand in the United States, 
all point to an improvement in the future, 
and certainly makers do not appear to be 
quite so despondent as they were a week or 
two ago, although they hardly expect any- 
thing but a quiet time over the winter. It is 
reported from the United States that fuel and 
ores are going down in price. This might 
prove an unfavorable factor leading to 
increased exports to Great Britain ; but if 
the demand is equal to the production, as it 
seems not unlikely to be if present expect- 
ations are fulfilled in the New Year, British 
makers will have nothing to fear on this 
head. — Iron and Coal Trades Review. 

NEW YORK METAL MARKET. 
The promise of an upward movement in 
tin values held out by the recovery reported 
yesterday has now been fulfilled. At least 
there has been a break in the London mar- 
ket.and while not as decided as was yester- 




OWN. 

\t\ fiiijpct.igjL has had 



a depressing effect. \ In the^neljsh market 
this morning there was a declineSpY 17s. 6d. 
in spot tin, but part of this loss was regained 
before the close, when the quotation stood 
at ;£i20 ios., or 7s. 6d. under last night's 
figures. There was comparatively little 
trading there in spot and only a moderate 
business in futures. To the relatively better 
demand for the latter than for spot tin is 
probably due the fact that the decline in 
futures amounted to 5s. In the New York 
market the feeling was depressed, though 
the change in prices was not marked. The 
demand was light and the close dull, with 
sales of spot tin at 26.87^0. and buyers at 
26.70c. January- February was nominally 
quoted at 26.50c. Two steamers were 
posted from London to-day with a total of 
825 tons, making the stock afloat 2,440 
tons. But 35 tons have arrived since the 
beginning of the month, 25 tons at Boston 
on Saturday last and 10 tons at this port 
to day. 

Copper — There was a slight decline in 
the London market, but no change in the 
situation here was to be noted, trade con- 
tinuing light, while the firm tone of the 
market was retained. For Lake Superior, 
the quotation was 17c, while electrolytic 
and casting were held at 16^ c. 

Pig Lead — Buyers are not anticipating 
requirements, and, as their current wants 
are small, there is little business doing at 
the moment. Prices are steady, however, 
on the basis of 4-37^c. in carload lots. 
The St. Louis market was reported by wire 
to be easy at 4. 17 j£c. 

Spelter — The easy feeling previonsly 
noted stilt prevails, as a result of continued 
dullness. No further change in prices is 
reported, however, the qnoted range being 
4 10 to 4.15c. St. Louis was easy, 3 90c. 
bid and 3.92^. asked. 

Antimony — Regulus remains quiet, but 
steady, at the range of 9 to ioy£c, as to 
brand and quantity. 

Tinplate — No change in the situation is 
noted. Deliveries on existing contracts 
make up the bulk of the current business, 
but an active demand is looked for later on, 
and the tone of the market is firm. 

The improvement in trade appears to be 
making rather slow progress, but as sellers 
have not looked for any decided increase in 
the volume of business this month they are 
very well satisfied with the situation as it 
stands, finding ample encouragement in 
such inquiries as are received for the con- 
fidence in the future. Advices from Chicago 
state that business there is within moderate 
limits, but it was not thought that it will 
assume active proportions much before the 
close of the month, the disposition being to 
wait for the announcement of ore prices, 
which it is expected will be made in about 
two weeks. — New York Journal of Com- 
merce, January 9. 



44 



THE 
" DAWN 
"OF 
"THE 

"NEW 

" CENTURY 

A copy of the New 
Century Catalogue of 

The Canada Paint 
Company has been 

mailed to each customer 
throughout the Domin- 
ion. Any of our friends 
failing to receive one 
will kindly write, and 
the catalogue, contain- 
ing a number of inter- 
esting features, will be 
sent at once. 

THE 

PAINT 

PROVIDERS 



THE 

CANADA 
PAINT 
COMPANY 

LIMITED. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



W 



the WATSON, FOSTER CO., limited 

^ <# ^ MONTREAL 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL GRADES OF 

<* WALL PAPER <* 




WORKS, ONTARIO STREET EAST. 
CAPACITY, 70,000 ROLLS PER DAY. 



PREPAID SAMPLES TO 
PROSPECTIVE BUYERS. 



ORDER WHILE THE 
LINE IS COMPLETE. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

HUNTER & CO., (Morton E. Hunter) 
general merchants, Morewood, Ont., 
have assigned to Francis Elliot. 

F. D. Ramsay & Co., general merchants, 
Chesley, Ont., have compromised. 

Herbert Bond, harness dealer, Inwood, 
Ont., has assigned to Wm. T. Fuller. 

Cyprien Primeau, general merchant, St. 

Urbain, Que., is offering 25c. on the dollar. 

Romain Boursier, general merchant, 

Lefaivre, Ont., is offering 30c. on the 

dollar. 

A. Leclair, general merchant, North 
Lancaster, Ont., is offering 40c. on the 
dollar. 

The Stevens Mfg. Co., iron and brass 
founders, etc., London, Ont., have sus- 
pended. 

The Hyde Trading Co., general merch- 
ants, Hyde. N.W.T. , are asking for an 
extension. 

H. Duchesneau, general merchant, Pointe 
Claire, Que., has compromised at 25c. on 
the dollar. 

D. Ticker & Co., general merchants, St. 
Cyrille de Wendover, have assigned to V. 
E. Paradis. 

Wm. Goldsmith, dealer in agricultural 
implements, Alexander, Man., is offering to 
compromise. 

The estate of John Verret, general 
merchant, Becancour, Que., is offering 50c. 
on the dollar. 

D. McLeod Vince has been appointed 
assignee of C. H. Taylor, general merchant, 
Hartland, N.B. 

A statement of the affairs of L. A. Dion, 
general merchant, St. Eustache, Que., is 
being prepared. 

Lamarche & Benoit have been appointed 
curators of A. D. Denis, general merchant, 
Farnham, Que. 

A meeting of the creditors of Alex. J. 
McDonald, general merchant, Seaside, 
N.S., has been held. 

Bilodeau & Chalifoux have been ap- 



pointed curators of A. Guimond, hardware 
dealer, etc., Montreal. 

J. Boydell & Co., general merchants, 
Robinson, Que., have assigned, and a 
meeting of their creditors has been held. 

A meeting to appoint a liquidator for The 
British Columbia Iron Works Co., Limited, 
New Westminister, B.C., has been called. 

E. Christie, general merchant, South 
Mountain, Ont., has assigned to J. K. 
Allen, Kemptville, Ont., and a meeting of 
his creditors will be held on January 11. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

T he John Tetrault Tool and Axe Works, 
Maissoneuve, Que., have dissolved. 

H. St. Germain & Cie have registered as 
carriagemakers in St. Hyacinthe, Que. 

Hooben & Wooten, wholesale and retail 
stove dealers, Halifax, have dissolved. 

Dupont & Lacroix, have registered part- 
nership as bicycle repairers, etc., Montreal. 

Pinder & Kenzie, general merchants, 
Dutton, Ont., have dissolved, D. M. Kenzie 
continuing. 

Morrow Bros. , general merchants, Portage 
la Prairie, Man., have dissolved, Albert 
Morrow retiring. 

Brett & Leighton, hardware dealers, etc., 
Orangeville, Ont., have dissolved. They 
are succeeded by Brett & Taylor. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

S. A. Torrance, blacksmith, etc., Carleton 
Place, Ont., has sold out. 

Lawther & Co., general merchants, Rus- 
sel. Man., are selling out. 

Charles Shaw, blacksmith, Caroll, Man., 
is advertising his business for sale. 

Theodore R. Constantine, blacksmith, 
Elgin, N.B., is advertising his business for 
sale. 

The stock of A. M. Wilson, general 
merchant, Barrington, N.S., has been sold 
by sheriff. 

CHANGES. 

George McKim, blacksmith, Omemee, 
Ont., has sold out to Richard Morton. 
E. A. Baker & Co., flour and feed 



dealers, have been succeeded by Charles 
Gass. 

M. A. Akesley, coal dealer, etc., 
Fredericton, N.B., has sold out to John S. 
Scott. 

E. McCarthy & Co., general merchants, 
Condie, Man., have sold out to George H. 
Brown. 

A. J. Ford & Co., general merchants, 
Woodham, Ont., have sold out to W. E. 
Doupe. 

Anderson & Merrick, general merchants, 
Oakville, Man., have sold out to Alex. B. 
Dalzell. 

Robinson & Co., general merchants, 
West Lome, Ont., have sold out to P. J. 
Lindenman. 

C. H. Clements & Co., general mer- 
chants, Aylesford, N.S., have sold out to 
Caldwell J. West. 

Joseph Scott, dealer in agricultural im- 
plements, Souris, Man , has been succeeded 
by A. J. Hughes. 

Dame Caroline Bergeron has registered 
as proprietress of Joseph Dion & Co., hard- 
ware dealers, Quebec. 

R. J. Greenwood & Son, harness dealers, 
Shoal Lake, Man., have sold their New- 
dale, Man., branch to T. L. Grove. 

H. W. Folkins, dealer in agricultural 
implements, etc., Sussex, N.B., has sold 
out to The Sussex Mercantile Co., Limited. 
deaths. ' 

Alex. Smith, tinsmith, etc., Stratford, 
Ont., is dead. 

Marcus Oxner, of M. & H. Oxner, 
general merchants, Chester Basin, N.S., is 
dead. 



Morfit & Raincock, late general merch- 
chants, Gladstone, Man., have assigned to 
C. H. Newton. 

Weldon W. Melville, who bought out J. 
A. Phillips, general merchant, Bath, N.B., 
has leased the store occupied by Mr. Phillips 
and will continue the business. Mr. Phillips 
will devote all his time to buying and ex- 
porting farm implements. 



Use Syracu 



abbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
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Dynamos, Marine 
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Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
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Faotories 



332 William St., MONTREAL, 
and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



QUE. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



C*s~« *-^ w 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND M 









Henry Rogers, 
Sons & Co. 

Wolverhampton, England. 

Manufacturers of__^^J^ 

"Union Jack" Galvanized Sheets 

Canada and Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Sleigh Shoes and Tyre Steel 

Coil Chain, Hoop Iron 

Sheet and Pig Lead 

Sheet Zinc 



Quotations can be had from 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



COOPERS 

ONE-PIECE ELBOWS. 

Scheipes Patent Stove Pipe 

Best In the world. 




Ask for 

COOPER'S 

PATENT ELBOW. 

Price Guaranteed. 



E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 



Sole Owners. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



SEP 

"JARDINE" 
HAND DRILLS 

Five different sizes to suit 
all requirements. It pays 
to sell the best tools. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 




BERGER S HOOKS 

SOIL PIPE HOOKS 

CAS PIPE HOOKS 

PLUMBERS' HOOKS 

CAS PIPE STRAPS 

FLASHING HOOKS 

Wrought or malleable, as desired. Large stock. Per- 
fect goods. Write for catalogue and prices. 

BERGER BROS. CO. 

RoofeJ^SU^PLIES* 231 and 237 Arch St., Philadelphia 

^/VVVV%'VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV^/VVVVVVVV%'%'VV%*I^^ 



This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 




Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, %g*2S5h2*L 



The Latest and Best 



H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 



Model 
1900. 




Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 



^ 



STEVENS FINE TOOLS 

We make a perfect line 

of m 

CALIPERS and DIVIDERS 

Also such tools as Surface Gauges, Tool Makers' 
Clamps, Center Punches, etc. 

Write for our New Catalogue containing a description of our Tools. It is also 
a valuable hand-book of information for mechanics and people interested in 
such lines. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 

P.O. Box 216, Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 
Carried by our representatives at Toronto and Montreal. 



HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Hand Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, white and colored. Tennis and Fly Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twines. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HAS THE JOBBER ANY RIGHT TO DO A 
RETAIL BUSINESS?* 



1WISH to call your attention at the outset 
to the fact that this question does not 
interest usalonein the State of Washing- 
ton, but is agitating the minds of the retailers 
and jobbers all over the country, particularly 
in the South and Middle West and on this 
Coast, where so many of the jobbing houses 
do a retail business, while in the East the 
retail business is done almost exclusively by 
retail houses, the jobbers being distributors 
to the retail trade. 

It is easy to account for this difference in 
policies, the South and West being newer 
sections of the country and the trade con- 
ditions not so thoroughly adjusted. Many 
of the jobbing houses located in the Southern 
and Western States started in business 
years ago as retail stores, and, as the 
country developed and their business grew 
got to doing a wholesale business, until 
to-day finds many of them immense, exclu- 
sive jobbers, while others are doing both 
wholesale and retail business in varying 
proportions. 

Now these two systems of conducting a 
jobbing business cannot both be right. The 
question follows, which is right ? From the 
standpoint of the retailer it is unfair for the 
jobber to load him up with all the goods he 
will buy, and then cut off his outlet for them 
by selling to his customers. 

THE JOBBER WHO RETAILS 

is unfair with the retail dealer when he 
claims the right to buy cheaper than he 
does, even if the retailer can use the same 
quantity of goods. 

He is unfair with the manufacturer in try- 
ing to persuade him not to sell direct to the 
retail trade, when he is himself doing a re- 
tail business. 

He is unfair with the legitimate jobber, 
who asks the manufacturer for a reasonable 
differential for distributing his goods, when 
it is shown on investigation that a large 
majority of the so-called jobbers on this 
coast are doing the principal retail business 
in their respective cities. 

The retailer is not alone in his view of 
the matter, for he is backed by the jobbing 
houses which do a legitimate jobbing busi- 
ness. 

I desire to call your attention to an address 
made by John Donnan at the Southern 
Hardware Jobbers' convention last June, 
when he discussed the question, "Can a 
manufacturer sell a jobber and a retail 
merchant in the same territory and conserve 
both interests ? " If you have not read this 
article, I would refer you to The Iron Age 

•Paper read Be ore the Washington Hardware Asso- 
ciation. 



of June 21, as I consider it one of the most 
comprehensive articles that has appeared in 
that magazine this year. In it he says : "I 
unhesitatingly state that I do not think a 
jobber has any right whatever to be a com- 
petitor of his customer." 

I will also read a short letter from one of 
the Portland hardware jobbers, which I 
clipped from The Iron Age recently, as 
follows : 

" We note with pleasure in the proceed- 
ings of a number of retail hardware associa- 
tions the effort that is being made to 

INDUCE THE JOBBER 

to refrain from selling at retail. This effort 
during the year should in all cases develop 
into a demand, and, if not acceded to, 
should be taken past the jobber to the 
manufacturer, or trust, controlling lines of 
hardware, metals or other goods pertaining 
to the retail hardware business. We, as 
jobbers, ask and demand of the manufac- 
turers that they refrain from selling to the 
retail trade, and if that point is not con- 
ceded, then that they grant a differential, 
which we are entitled to as distributers, 
relieving them of the expense and risk 
incurred in attempting to be manufacturers 
and jobbers. 

THE RETAILER 

is entitled to the same protection from the 
jobber that we ask from the manufacturer, 
and should not be forced to come into com- 
petition with him. In many cities, east and 
west, as well as on this coast, there are 
large firms that properly should come under 
the head of large retailers, rather than 
jobbers. True, they are on the jobbers' list 
and buy at bedrock, but that enables them 
to take an unfair advantage of a competitor 
confining himself to wholesale, while they 
have their retail profit to cut down their 
store expense if they hold to retail prices, 
and if not, as is often the case, their jobbing 
costs and carload rates of freight, to take 
undue advantage of retail competitor. We 
trust this issue will be fought to a finish." 

When in San Francisco last June, I 
noticed one of the principal jobbing hard- 
ware houses had a prominent sign near the 
door which read, " We sell no hardware at 
retail," and I was told that none of the San 
Francisco jobbers do a retail business, all of 
which shows that the sentiment of a large 
percentage of the jobbers is with us on this 
point. 

There are a number of important ques- 
tions that will come up for our consideration 
in the association from time to time, but, 



as Mr. Bryan expresses it, I believe this 
to be 

THE PARAMOUNT ISSUE, 

for on it hinge most of the others. 

We cannot be in favor of large freight 
differentials between carloads and less, nor 
of the manufacturer allowing the jobber who 
is selling his goods at retail much preference 
in the matter of price, if we have to sell in 
direct competition. 

We must not overlook the fact that this 
system of doing business has been in force 
on this coast for years and a custom that 
has been practiced so long cannot be 
revolutionized at once. 

All sorts of 

RETALIATORY SCHEMES 

have been suggested in the past for the 
purpose of ' ' getting back at ' ' the retail 
jobber. I tell you, gentlemen, this asso- 
ciation is not organized for the purpose of 
antagonizing or "getting back at" any 
one. Two wrongs do not make a right. 
We are joined together for the purpose of 
drawing the interests of the hardware busi- 
ness closer, not for the purpose of fighting, 
and from the attitude that jobbers have 
taken toward us it will not be necessary to 
fight. They have intimated their willing- 
ness to give us a hearing, to discuss this 
and other matters with us, and grant every- 
thing in reason that we ask. They have 
come half way. It rests with us, by using 
wise counsel, piudent management and 
common sense, to have this and other 
differences adjusted. 



CANNOT TAX ENGINE AND BOILER. 

On Monday Recorder Weir, of Montreal, 
gave judgment in a case of appeal from the 
assessor's decision in the case of Dame 
Jane Drummond, widow of the late John 
Redpath, and Francis Robert Redpath, in 
their quality of testamentary executors of 
the will of the late John Redpath, levying 
an assessment of $1,500 on a boiler and 
engine which does not belong to them as 
proprietors of premises containing it, but to 
the tenants leasing the premises. 

In giving judgment, Recorder Weir refers 
to a section of a statute exempting from 
taxation machinery that is used for ' ' motive 
power," which would clearly exempt the 
machinery in question. He then continues, 
" I, therefore, order that the assessment 
and valuation roll be amended by striking 
out the sum of $1,500 placed against the 
names of petitioners for machinery contained 
in their property , 45 St. Maurice street, 
each party to pay its own costs, as the 
presumption naturally was against the pro- 
prietors at the moment of valuation." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



a 



jj 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents : 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




We Manufacture^*^ 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CURHE^T IVLAHKET QUOTATIONS 



Janua'y 11, 190). 
These Fries a>e for such qualili s and 
quantities as are usually rder d oy retail 
dealers on the usual te ms of c edir,, the 

1 west figure . being fur larger quantiti- s mid 
inouit t p-y. Large cash I uyd's can fre- 
quently make mrchase a httverpticts The 
Edit* r is anxious to be informed at once i>f 
ai y apparent error* in this list as the defile 
is co make it peifectly .ecurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 33 U 34 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Per box 

I.O., usual sizes $7 00 

I.X., " 8 50 

I.X.X., " 10 00 

Famous— 

1.0 7 50 

l.X 8 50 

I.X.X 9 50 

Karen & Vulture Grades— 

I.C., usual sizes 5 00 

I.X., " 6 00 

I.X.X " 7 0J 

I.XXX., " 8 00 

D.U.,12%xl7 4 75 

D.X 5 50 

D.X.X 7 50 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel — 

I.C., usual sizes 4 30 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 3d 

20 i 28 8 75 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I.O., 20i28, 112 sheets 8 75 

I.X., Terne Tin 10 75 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per 11 . 
X. X., 14x56, 50 sheet bxs) 

•' 14x60 " )■ 07 07% 
•' 14x65, " J 
Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08^ 

'• 26 " 08% 09 

• 28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 165 170 

Kenned " " 2 15 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 05 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 10 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base .... 2 00 

TireSteel.... 2 00 

Machinery iron finish 2 05 

Cast Steel, per lb 00 00 

ToeCalk Steel .... 2 30 

T. Firth & Cos special cast steel, per 11). 13 

Jessop's Tool Steel 13 

Boiler Tube?. 

'Vinch 21% 

2 '• 13% 

2* " 016 

3 » 17'/ 2 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

^i.eb 225 

3-16inch 2 25 

«4 iaohandthickir 2 25 

Black Sheets. 

18 gauge 3 10 

20 gauge 3 10 

22to24 " 320 

2« " 3 30 

28 " 3 40 

Canada Plater. 

All dull. 52 sheets 3 15 

Half polished 3 25 

All bright 3 85 4 00 



Iron Pipe. 

Black pipe — 

% in. h 3 00 

% ■ 3 00 

% ' 3 10 

■>« " 3 3/ 

1 " 4 50 

1% " 6 15 

l l / 2 " 7 75 

2 " 10 4J 

2 1 2 -6 inch, di : count 6 * p c. 

Q Ivanized p pe - 

"- i. ch 4 50 

54 " 5 uo 

1 " 7 n0 

V/ t " 9 53 

l'/ 2 " 11 (5 

2 " 15 75 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16 gauge .... 45 4 10 

18 to 24 gauge 4 35 4 20 4 35 4 35 
26 " 4 6 1 4 45 4 35 4 60 

28 " 4 85 4 70 4 50 4 85 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 
Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb 

% " 8 00 8 50 

5-16 " " 5 35 5 

% " " 4 35 4 85 

7-16 " " 4 15 1 65 

% " " 4 35 4 50 

% " " 3 85 4 35 

% " " 3 8J 4 U0 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 25 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis 

count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis. 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 

Ingot 

English B. S., ton lots 19 20 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cut lengths round, % to % in. 23% 25 
' ' round and square 

1 to 2 inches. ... 23% 25 
Sheet. 
Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 23 23 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4i6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea.. per lb 25% 

35 to 45 " " .... 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " 23% 

Boiler and T. K. Pitts 

Plain TiDned, ptr lb 28 

Spun, per.lb 32 

Brass. 

Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 percent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 u 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 06 06% 

Domestio " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5cwt.casks 6 75 7 00 

Partcasks 7 tO 7 5d 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 04% 05 

Bar.llb 05% 05 5 ,4 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by .... m /t 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 



Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f o.b. Toron'o. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-f . lengths lists at 7% cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1 lb. ; chilled, S7.C0 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and bah, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% p.c. Prices are f o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalised 
on Montreal. 

Soil I'lpe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and lo percent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 

Bar half-and-half 19 2'i 

Refined .9 

Wiping 18 

Note.— Prices of this graded according tn 

quantity. The prices of other qualities of 

solder in the market indioated by private 

brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Percwt. 

Pure 6 62% 

No. 1 do 6 25 

No.2do 5 87% 

No.3do 5 50 

No. 4 do 5 12% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 12y 2 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 6 87% 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. caBks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, percwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 0(9 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 06'/ 2 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kega 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In %. % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities,per gallon 1 10 

Barn (inbbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 1 45 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 1 25 

Toronto Lead* OilorCos Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 
Colors in Oil. 
25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green.... i 9 

Colors, Dry. 
Yellow Ochre ( J.C. ) bbls.... 135 140 
Yellow Ochre (J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 1 10 1 15 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red(best). per cwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt.. 1 75 2 00 
Canadian Oxides, per cwt., . 175 2 00 
Super MagnetioOxides, 93p.c. 2 00 I 25 
Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

GolfUn Oobre 03% 



Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb 

boxes, per lb 08 21 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 1001b 10) 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, per lb .... 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 8) 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb 81 

Whiting, per 100 lb u 55 

Blue Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 0(8 

Putty. 

Bulk in bbls 2 00 

Bulk in less quantity 2 15 

Bladders in bbls 221 

Bladders in kests, boxes orljise. ... 2 35 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 45 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 75 

Bladders ia Lu k onios less than 1001b3 00 
Varnishes. 
In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 41 2 8J 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

" No. 1 1 60 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 3) 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 60 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8 J 

" " No. 1 ... 1 6J 2 00 



The Imperial 
Varnish & Color 
Co's , Limited 
Elastilite Varnish 
1 gal. can, each. 
$2.00. 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2.00. 




Maple Leaf 
Coach Enamels ; 
Size 1, 10c ; 
Size 2, 35c. ; Size 
3, 20c. each 



Linseed OH. 

1 t~ 1 v-wi j ■- j, Raw - Boiled. 

1 to 4 bbls delivered $0 82 $0 85 

5 to 9 bbls " gi g 4 

Toronto, Hamilton, London and Guelph 

jJC. I6SJ. 

Turpentine. 

Single barrel, freight allowed .... Hi 

2 to 4 barrels '• *' , i<# u ^3 

Castor Oil 

East India, in cases, per lb. .0 10 10% 

" " small lots lu(/ 2 oil 

Cod Oil, Etc 

Cod Oil per gal 50 55 

Pure Olive 120 

" Neatsfoot ', 90 

Glue. 

Common 08% C? 

French Medal rj 14 OH'/, 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 2u 

Gelatine 21 3d 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 1» 20 

Huttner jg 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE ANu METAL 



STEEL, PEECH & TOZER, luw 

Phoenix Special Steel Works. The Ickles, near Sheffield, England. 



Manufacturers of 



Axles and Forgings of all descriptions, Billets and Spring 
Steel, Tyre, Sleigh Shoe and Machinery Steel. 



Sole Agents for Canada. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition . 

Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps. Doni. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, lOp.o. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap ' and 
"Dominion" grades, 25 per cent Rival 
and Nitro, net list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb 

Best thick white felt wadding, in 3 4-lb 

bags • ■ ■ : ■ ! 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-ib. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 530 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5 j0 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of l,0u0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
oloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge U 60 

9 and It gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5and6gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Perlb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined — 4 50 

Wilkinson & Co.'s Anvils.. lb. U9 09% 

Wilkinsons Co. 's Vices., lb. 09% 10 
Angers. 

Gilraour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, per doz 6 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 33Vs per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc .... 600 

Capper, disoountl5 p.c. off revised list 
Baths. 
Standard Enameled. 

5'/,-inch rolled rim, Ut quality 30 00 

■■ 2nd " 22 00 

Anti-Frlctlon Metal. 

"Tandem" A perlb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

SYRACUSE BMELTINO WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo 29 

Special •••••- ,;■• 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse .. 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
Amerioan make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

Blindand Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07% 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Carriage Bolls, full square, Norway 70 

" " full square 70 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 65 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 65 

Coach Screws 75 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 75 

Blank Bolts 65 

Bolt Ends 65 

Nuts, square 4%c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 60 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 , " 6 00 

HeniB, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 165 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 10 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cont. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per c nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent 
Plate, diB. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nob. 31 and 32, par gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulic 125 150 



Chalk. 

Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon , per gross 14 18^ 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c.; 

Churns . 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8 - 
No. 1, $8.50— v o. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4. $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 58 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. caBh in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet §8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout 4 75 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout 5 25 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Teu'onic, plain 14 50 

" " embossed 15 00 

Plain Richelieu 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu 4 00 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Ont. Syphon Jet, plain. . 20 00 
" " " " emb'd. 20 50 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 60 

" oval, 17x14 in 150 

" " 19x15 in 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. J 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles. Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33 1 3 per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" " 5, " 22% 

" 6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 

Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets . 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No.l.perdoz 1 4 

No. 2, per doz 1 20 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. " 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 p.c. to 60, 10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Inohes. 

Under 26 2.10 4 00 .... 6 CO 

26 to 40 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

41 to 50 4 75 .... 7 25 

51 to 60 5 00 .... 8 50 

61 to 70 5 35 .... 9 25 

71 to 80 5 75 .... 10 50 



81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86 to 90 14 00 

91to95 15 5j 

99tol00 18 On 

GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each... 165 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per groSB 

% '• 9 00 

" %to% H00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 1 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, — per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Maguetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb. ..0 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe.perdoz.net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 100 150 

Fork. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. 4 B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 100 125 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 7o 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

Cross-Cut SawB. 

Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%,10-ft. run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft .run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft- run 21 00 

Lane's O.N.T- track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" " 5-in., " .... 06'/« 

" 6-in., " .... 06 
" 8-in., " .... 05% 
" " 10-in., " .... 05fr 

Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pai s 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and 10 p.c 

Planter, per doz 100 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount, 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dls. 
47% per oent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 
HORSE NAILS. 

"O" brand 50 p.o. die. I _ , . 
"M" brand 50 p.o. |°' al h(;a<J - 

Acadian, 50 and 10 per oent. 



(Vr/k 



j7W r ||\J 



CAN^ipW^ H 



ARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



MALEHAM & YEOMANS, 



Highest Award. 




Manufacturers of. 



Table Cutlery, Razors, 
Scissors, Butcher Knives 
and Steels, Palette and 
Putty Knives. 



SPECIALTY : 



Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1889. 



Cases of Carvers and 
Cabinets of Cutlery. 



SHEFFIELD, 

ENGLAND. 






"W BRAD SHAW*. SON 




WHOLESALE ONLY. 



F. H. SCOTT, 360 Temple Building, MONTREAL. 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller 
Light medium, and heavy. . . 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Ouelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door .japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz. 7 50 

No. 3 " Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Pish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk ,T 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russell & Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 26 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 
English and Am., per doz.... 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Yitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 8 50 100 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d. and 3d $3 35 $3 85 

3d 3 00 3 52 

4and5d 2 75 3 35 

6and7d 2 65 3 20 

8and9d 2 50 3 00 

lOand 12d 2 45 2 95 

16and20d 2 40 2 90 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 35 2 85 

Galvanizing 2o. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 percent 



NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 1 85 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 50 per cent, for McMullen's. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

(J. S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (US ) .... 16'/ 2 

Prime White (U.S ) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can ) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 

can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dutferin pattern pails, dis. 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 10 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 

PICKS. 
Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 175 3 00 

Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
o 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 
German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Impression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 
Jenkins disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 per cent. 
Standard valves, discount, E0 per per cent. 
Jenkins radiator valves discount 55 per cent. 
" " " standard, dis, 60 p.c 

Quick opening valves discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1001b. or less 85 

1.CO0 lb. or more 80 

Net 3) days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 25 pe cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 1 00 

RANGE BOILERS. 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 6 50 

35 " 7 50 

40 " 8 50 



Copper, 30 " 22 00 

"• 35 " 26 00 

" 40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable Canadian list 

50 and 10 p.c. revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 
New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler* Co.'s 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile 4 Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, discount 60 end 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 60 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets & Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 

7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 9 13 

%in 10 14 

% and 5-16 in 15 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger ' i 16% 

" 5-32iDdi 21% 

Viinch .22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute -v 8 

Lath Yarn 9 3 4 

New Zealand Rope . . 10% 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set- 
Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 70 

" No. 50, nickle-plated... . 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% per cent. 
B & A. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. & D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.... 35 55 
S. * D. , dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

' frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 CO 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALES. 
B. S. 4 M. Scales, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
Dominion, 55 p.c. 
" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 



SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., iron, and steel, 85 p. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 8> p.c. 
" F. H., braes, dis.77% p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 70 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 70 p.c. 
" R.H. " 65 p.c. 

Drive Screws, 80 per cent. 

Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co , full nickeled, dis. 69 p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

I,l%lb.,perlb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 * 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev. list. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, dis. , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 00 

Plain 00 3 45 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 
STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb, 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

'"" Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates of 25 lengths. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net cash .... $4 80 
No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Percent 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 & 10 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 & 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 5 

" " tinned 80 & 10 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only . .75 & 15 

" % weights 60 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 4 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85 & 12% 

" brush, blued 4 tinned, bulk..70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 4 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet lacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52 



3ti 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB. „ j. „ * *• A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Montreal ' -Canadian Representatives- Montreal 



U. S. A. 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Trunk nails, blac* Bj ana 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued and tinned 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

•• " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

" " " bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz . . 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson's per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. &N.. P. S. ft W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72y 9 , 75 p.c. 



TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. k D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian , per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb ... . 22 26 
Wrapping, mauled, per pack. 5) ON) 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 20 

" 4-ply 26 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES. 

Hand, per doz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 12 13 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, $2.80 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nos. 2 to 5, ad- 



vance 7c. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9, base- 
No. 10, advance 7c— No.ll, 14c— No. 12. 
20c— No. 13, 35c— No. 14. 47c— No. 15, 
60c— No. 16, 75c. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, Sp- 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c. 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c. 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 17% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No. 18, $5.50- No. 19, $6 -No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7-No. ii, $7.30— No. 23, 
$'.65 -No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
89.50-No. 27, $10-No. 28. $ll-No 29, 
$12- No. 30, 813— No. 31, $14— No. 32, $15 
No. 33, $16— No. 34. $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31, 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil- 
ing, 10c— in 25-1' . bundles, 15c. —in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in H-lb. hanks, 81— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Galvanized Wire, per 1001b.— No». 6, 7,8,$3.85 
No. 9, $3.10-No. 10, 34.00— No. 11, $4.05 
No. 12, 83.25-No. 13, $3.35-No. 14, 
$4.40-No. 15, $4.93-No. 16. $5.15. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 
per 1,000 feet 



3 30 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B. 

Galvanized 4 barb, 2V+ and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 1" 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 97Vi 

io less than carlots, and $2.85 in carlots. 

Terms, 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 
Ross braid truss cable 4 5J 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. 1 50 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c. off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" 8., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. 4 K.'s Pipe, perdoz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $60 00 

Royal Canadian " 58 00 

Royal American " 50 00 

Discount, 45 per cent.; terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 and 5 per cen 



^ 



"THE MARSHALL" v ^ 



Up-to-Date 



Adjustable Display Sta^d 
^' Window Dresser 




Easily adjusted to 



More than 20 Different Positions. 



Having a ledge on each of the shelves to support the goods 
when at different angles. 

ORNAMENTAL, HIGHLY FINISHED, 
STRONGLY MADE. 



Manufactured by- 



E. M. MARSHALL, SA T A - ™ T - 



Send for Catalogue and Prices. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



" FIRMUS" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable. 

Orders will not be accepted for second quality or "mixed" goods. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 



Western Ontario Representative — 

WM. B. STEWART. 
Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



■ ■ Limited 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



SEND for specimen copy of Phillips' Monthl Machinery 
Register, containing over 5.000 entries of new and 
second-hand machinery of every description. The oldest 
established and most successful medium in the world. 
Established 25 years for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to tho e who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per aunum, all over the 
world, and is used for continual reference by a lar^e number 
of firms. It is consequently a most valuable advertising 
medium for all engineers and manufacturers. Subscription , 
Cb. per annum, price per oopy, *>d. Sole Proprietor, Chas. 
D. Phillips, M.I ME.. Newport, Mon, England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mon.' 



IN BUYING- 



LINSEED OIL 

it is always well to get the purest and 
best — something you can recommend and 
guarantee to your customers. 

Stewart Bros. & Spencer's 

is the best. Name on every barrel. 
Special quotations for import. 



J. WATTERSON & CO. 

MONTREAL, Agents for Canada. 

WO fO-PAV -fH^fJ, 
ySffforVO Atto S\Jft£. 
' f M A flf3fr*l *NP 

DO YOlf? 

rvertiserneeit 
in the 4» 

To^orJ-ro 

u/itl bring you, 
tenders/ram tfif 
f/J. t -', fast contractors 




BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PRESULlrriNG BUREAU, 

505 Board of Trade Bldg., MONTREAL, QUE. 

Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



73 YEARS 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 

r ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. n1Sa)£ r, n. j , . ff £s e a 90 Ch " ,nber • st 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



• ESTABLISHED 1849— 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connexions have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN. N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen, Man. Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A, FULTON, Gen. Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



Awarded a Gold Medal at 
PARIS EXPOSITION for 

superiority. That's proof 
enough of their quality, and 
dearly shows that they are 
the best. 



The 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 




Dominion Pattern 

Cow Tie • Stall Fixture 

The special features of the tie and stall fixture are well 
shown in the illustration. As will be noticed the chain is 
very short, which prevents all danger of entanglement with 
the animal's foot. At the same time the form of the fixture 
is such that great freedom is allowed to the head. Because 
of the short chain this tie is much cheaper than the ordin- 
ary patterns. 

The stall fixture is made from a tough quality of steel 
and is very strong. Also, owing to its circular cross-section , 
it is exceedingly rigid. Its simplicity, convenience, cheap- 
ness, and ease of attaching make it very popular with cow 
tie users. 

This form of tie and stall fixture are sometimes called 
Niagara pattern. 

American or Flat Link Chain, 

for years the standard cow tie chain in "the States ' 
is now rapidly coming in favor in Canada. Its 
short link, handsome appearance and smooth sur- 
face — which cannot injure the animal's neck — make 
it superior to all other styles of chain for cow ties _ 

For sale by all Jobbers ; manufactured by 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, """"Sitf*"* 



£^%<%< 



^%s%*/**%s%s%*s%^^%^w%+^%w%,* 



S-t. 1968 




Inc. 1896 



Black Diamond FileWorks 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve - c **^^^> t Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




^vv%ww%%%%%%^ 



1901 





E. '901 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms - 
49-61-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO, C anada. 

Factories -I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Tin Plate 
Company, 

Battery Park Building, New York City. 

Manufacturers — ^bi^^- 

TIN PLATE 
TERNE PLATE 



and 



BLACK PLATE. 



B.SS. H. THOMPSON *C0'Y 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 

Sole Agents for Dominion of Canada. 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and— dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar brand 

CALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 

GALVANIZED CORRUGATED SHEETS 
"BLAGKWALL" BRAND 



-WWW^/WVWWWWV* V****. 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Get the Best. 

Extra 1, 2, and 3. 
LANGWELL'S BABBIT, Montreal. 



^ 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XIII 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 19, 1901. 



NO. 3 



'TANDEM" ANTI-FRICTION METIL 



'Tandem 1 ' Metals are better than 
any other for their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 



Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 

A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents t 

LAMPLOUGH ft McN AUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice- Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of A nti- Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals tn Europe, 




ALWAYS BRIGHT 



a?.««y*TO 




Galvanized Iron often turns 
black after a short exposure to the 
weather. If so, it's not "Queen's 
Head," which not only keeps its 
color, but outlasts the other iron 
by years. 



CANADA 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, 
MONTREAL. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, 



LIMITED. 




/yi^L^LA— A. 



■ 



A 



i* 



oi 



Confidence means success — past, present, 
"Xrfd "Future success. The Safford Radiators were never 
yet found wanting in a single, vital part. They solve the 
problem of Steam or Hot- Water Heating, because — hav- 
ing no joints they cannot leak, standing a pressure of 140 
lbs. to the square inch they cannot break, having no ob- 
structions in the pipes the heat circulates freely in one 
minute after the heat is turned on. 

The Safford Radiators 

are light, 
yet strong — handsome as a Radiator can be. They fit 
circles, curves, angles. There are twenty-five different 
styles. They are the Radiators of Confidence — the original 
invention in screw threaded nipple connections. Send for 
our free, illustrated Booklet — it will give you "Confidence" 
in the largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British flag. 



The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, 

TORONTO, ONT. 



£> E 0LS OF ALL KINDS 

We are handling a complete line of Wood's famous ice 
tools and will be pleased to give you estimates on supplies 
for 1901. 



SAWS 
_ _ PLOWS 
WI * IT E ■ M MARKERS 

FOR JL^^^JLdl CHISELS 

PRICES. TONGS, Etc. 



ICE 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



-Limited. 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets, Toponto 

1 THE ' 1 



Abbott-Mitchell 



1 — ■ 1 



Iron and Steel Company 



OF ONTARIO, LIMITED. 

Manufacturers of . . . 



i Bar Iron and Steel s 

I Nails, Spikes 

I Horse Shoes . . 

I Bolts, Washers, etc. , 



Belleville, 
Ontario. 



3 
3 



6 ^ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND y META 



cBELTING 




ME' 



i 




' Para ' brand of 

past ; we have 

ire satisfaction." 




jeai. Grain Elevating Co., 
.^11 .Montreal, P.Q. 



Canadian RubberC - 

MONTREAL -:•> TORONTO 
WINNIPEG 



NEW BALDWIN \ 



DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Kodern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN. SPRUCE LININGS. 

BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation— 
Sanitary— Odorless. 
Latest Cleanahle Fea- 
tures — The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Locks 
Ball- Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Bubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prioes. 



i 




I 



Built in ihe newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the East 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively; stock goods; spccia 
A refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

• Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

\ BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



I 

f 

i 

! 
! 



SOME OF TH E NEWER » VAN!/ ETC"" T(\(\\ C 

^ — TrliiiMLL I UULO 




NO. 41 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN HANDLE. 




^^YANKEE" -—"" 
AUTOMATIC DRILL NS42 



*•#*&» 



NO. 42 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN BOX. 




-V 




NO. 50 RECIPROCATING DRILL, FOR WOOD OR METALS. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SAP SPOUTS 



^\ 



"EUREKA " 




i 



Cuts Show 
Full Size 
Of Spouts. 

4* 



Patented 1896. 




THE "EUREKA") ..„„„ (?T" , ?t" ,dD ^^ 

f Because i $ a fe an( j Secure— No Leakage 

Steel Sap Spouts C are j Easily inserted, does not injure the tree 

) \ Secure Full Flow of Sap 



Are Ever Popular 




"IMPERIAL 



• • The "IMPERIAL" is made of 
Heavy Tinned Steel, neatly 
retlnned. Specially adapted 
for covered Sap Buckets. 



ALL PACKED IN CARDBOARD BOXES, 100 EACH. 

Berlin Bronze, made in 22 and 24 gauge. Tinned Steel, made in 20 gauge. 

PRICES ON APPLICATION. 

The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL. 



Brass 

Rods 

Sheets 
Tubes. 



Copper 

Bars 

Sheets 
Ingots. 



LARGE STOCKS. PRICES ON APPLICATION. 



SAMUEL, SONS 4 BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington Street West. 



TORONTO, ONT. 



- 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND. METAL 



^ Tjr y\ n^ c cr starr MF6 - cos 

^% JA^ Jf^ J^ 1"^ j^| standard lines of 

= ^ === ^ =========ii==== ^ == Acme and Hockey Skates 

also UNION HARDWARE CO'S Hockey. 



Toronto Office: 

32 Front St.West 

H. T. Eager. 



#s 




Branch House: 

George D. Wood 
& Co., 

Winnipeg. 



LADIES' SKATE WITH LEATHER ANKLE SUPPORT. 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



"O 



Wood, Vallance & Co., - Hamilton 



Does your twine trade 



vvvvwwwwvwwww 




Try 



44 



need a tonic ? 

PLYMOUTH" 



THE STAMP OF 
i EXCELLENCE. 



It is world- renowned as a trade invigorator and stimu- 
lator. This is the experience, not only of the dealers who 
have handled it, but is also the verdict of thousands of 
farmers who use only " Plymouth." 

"PLYMOUTH" does its work, and does it well. 



Plymouth Binder Twine Agency, McKinnon BIdg., flelinda St., Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE PATENT 

FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 



OF OUR 





FOR 



is one of the special features that 
give it precedence over all other Ranges. 

This arrangement is of special advantage, as nothing — 
not even the warping of the frame — can interfere with its easy 
working. The 

DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 
OVEN THERMOMETER 

are other improvements that have made the Imperial 
Oxford the popular range of Canada. 

If you're not handling them, write for price list — 
they're wonderful sellers. 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 



TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. » minimi it m m mmimiimsmmtaimBi^^si 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL 




« 




David Maxwell & Sons 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 

" Maxwell Favorite Churn " Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, 
and Detachable Driving Link Improved for sea- 
son of igoi. Steel or Wood Frame as desired. 



High and Low Wheels, 
from 12-in. to ao-in. 
widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and Cutting 

Plate. 

If your Wholeaale House does not offer you 



Wheelbarrows. 



Steel Frame. 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



In Four different 


these articles 


Sizes. 


...SEND DIRECT TO US. 




"THE MAXWELL" 




^ Lawn Mower 




i^fefe^ High Wheel 10 inohes 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Brok:r, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 






<jiic?itli'aZ- 



CC-Mrr ^.44tT rtt, ni>kil\'c*L6t>t 



Dundas Axes 

are ground sharp. If you are 
as sharp you will wait to 
see them before buying, or 
write for samples and prices 



to 



Dundas Axe Works 

DUNDAS, CANADA. 

WANT TO 

MAKE 

MONEY? 



^IR4L0 



1 CqiMii Sullirj fill FiisL 






^SCfXSf 



THE «IT*A1.0 COfVANY. 







Get a good 

WALL TINT 



MURALO 

The advertising methods of The Muralo Co. 

are up-to-date. The goods sell and stay sold. 

Repeat orders are certain and profits sure. 
AGENTS. 

A. RAMSAY &. SON, MONTREAL, 

J. H. ASHDOWN, WINNIPEG. 

McLENNAN, McFEELY &. CO., - - VANCOUVER. 




VanTuyl & Fairbank 



Petrolia. Ont. 

Headquarters for . . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps, Casing, Tubing, 
Fittings, Drilling Tools, 
Cables, etc. 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 




"DAISY" CHURN ^ 

Has tempered steel cased bicycle ball bearings, strongest, neat- 
est and most convenient frame. Only two bolts to adjust in 
setting up. Steel Bow Levers, suitable for either a standing or 
sitting posture. Has four wheels and adjustable feet to hold 
stand steady while churning When churn is locked to stand 
the bow can be used as handles to move it about on the front 
wheels as handy as a baby carriage. Open on both sides to 
centre, giving free space for pail. Made with wood or steel 
stands, with Cranks only, or Bow Levers as desired. 

Vollmar Perfect Washer 

Has a most enviable record. A 
perfection of its kind — will wash 
more clothes in less time, do it better 
and easier, with less wear and tear, 
than any other machine. 



THE. 



Wortman 4 Ward Mfg. Co., 




Limited 
LONDON, ONT 

Eastern Brancn, 60 McGill Street, Montreal, Que 



IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 




Every chain guaranteed. Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 

The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 

"BRASS. TE" 





None genuine without the 
above "Trade Mark." 

"GuDn's' 

Patent 

"Brassite" 

Goods. 

Equal to Solid Brass in every 
particular. Cost less money — 
look and wear as well. Our 
sales are increasing all the time. 
Why not increase your sales ? 

THE GUNK CASTOR CO. 

Limited. 

KNOX HENRY, Canadian Agent, 220^ Board of Trade, MONTREAL. 



Manufactu 

and 
Patent 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph 



CANADA. 



The Woodyatt Lawn Mower 

has proved itself 

THE REST —i 
HIGH-GRADE MOWER 



' 



in the market. 



Sizes ■ 12, 14, 16, 18 20 In. Cut. 



THE WOODYATT 



THE STAR LAWN MOWER 

is a Medium-Grade Mower 
of exceptional value. 



Sizes— 12, 14, 16 In. Cut. 




Sold only through the Wholesale Trade. 



THE STAR 




KEMP'S 

Broad-Hoop 
Roll-Rim 




Milk Can Bottoms 

possess all the points which go to make perfection in Can Bottoms. They have been 
used by a criticizing public for two seasons, and their popularity is evidence of the 
satisfaction which they gave. The roll rim has no sharp turns, which break the grain 
of the metal and lessen its wearing qualities. It has a broad wearing surface and will 
not damage floors. They do not cost more than inferior bottoms. 

The Iron Clad Trimmings are made the same as the Broad Hoop, and differ from 
them only in having a narrower and thicker hoop, which does not require the roll-rim, 
and, therefore, can be sold cheaper. 



Manufactured by 



_ For durability and finish, our Trimmings are unequalled. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., l0 ™™ 




VOL XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JANUARY 19, 1901. 



NO. 3. 



President, 

JOHN BAYNE MacLBAN, 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North- West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.B. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES 

MONTREAL - - - - Board of Trade Building. 

Telephone 1155, 

TORONTO 10 Front Street East. 

Telephone 1148, 
LONDON, ENQ. - - - - 109 Fleet Street, B.C.. 

J. M. McKim, 
MANCHESTER, ENQ. - - - 18 St Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner, 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block. 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. - - • No. 3 Market Wharf. 

I. Hun*" White, 

NEW YORK. 176 E. 88th Street, 

W. J. Brandt. 

Travelling Subscription Agents : 
T. Donaghy. F. S. Millard. 

Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - • 12s. 

Published ever; Sat irday. 
C.b.«Addrea. { ^script, Londor. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE MENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



THE BICYCLES FOR 1901. 

A MEMBER of Hardware and 
Metal's staff is in New York, at 
the Motor Exhibition, and writes : 
There are some surprises at the Sixth 
Annual Cycle Show which opened in Madi- 
son Square Garden this week. It is an 
exposition not only of bicycles of twentieth- 
century design, but of motor cycles and 
automobiles of improved types. As such it 
is more comprehensive and more generally 
attractive than any of its predecessors. 

All available space in the Garden amphi- 
theatre has been pressed into service for the 
show. Two great balconies were built over 
the arena boxes to accommodate the over- 
flow. More than 100 individual exhibitors 



expose to the scrutiny of the public their 
respective contributions toward perfection in 
cycle and motor vehicle construction. 

In the wheel models of 1901 on view are 
found improvements that will be welcomed 
by experienced riders. In their twentieth- 
century initial output manufacturers all 
seem to be animated by the same idea — 
that is, to provide for the comfort of the 
cyclist, even at the sacrifice of speed. A 
visit to the show demonstrates that the 
bicycle of 1901 is pre-eminently a comfor- 
table bicycle. 

In the new models seven features are 
conspicuous at the show. These all cater 
to ease of running and comfort. They 
are : 

Cushion frames, of hygienic principles, on high- 
grade machines. 

General use of chainless gear on better grades of 
machines. 

General use of coaster brakes on same machines. 

General use of handle bars that may be adjusted 
to any position without necessitating a dismount. 

Use of improved spring saddles. 

Slight lengthening in pedal cranks. 

Small reduction in weight of better grades of 
machines. 

With bicycle equipped with cushion 
frame and improved spring saddle the 
rider may pedal over cobblestones or other 
uneven pavement without the disagreeable 
jarring sensation experienced on a rigid 
machine. The use of -adjustable handle- 
bars will obviate the cramping of the rider's 
wrists or arms because of being held con- 
stantly in one position. The advantages of 
the chainless gear and coaster brake already 
have been proved, while larger pedal cranks 
will give greater power in climbing grades. 

These, however, are not the only changes 
in wheel construction that may be seen at 
the Garden. Scarcely a machine is exhib- 
ited that does not have some improvements 
in detail work. One model alone shows 1 1 



alterations, most of which are in small de- 
tails. In motor bicycles, tricycles and quad- 
ricycles, the display is probably the most 
complete ever made in this country. Many 
bicycle manufacturers have begun the build- 
ing of small motor machines, and such as 
have vehicles ready for the market exhibit 
their models. The regular automobile ex- 
hibits, while necessarily curtailed, are 
interesting and instructive. 

One established feature of the show is 
not lost sight of this year. That is the dis- 
tribution of souvenirs. There are several 
voting contests, the prize in one of which, 
for the most popular schoolteacher, being 
a chainless bicycle. To the most popular 
public school scholar a chain wheel will be 
given ; while to the bicycle club member 
receiving the most votes a tandem will be 
awarded. 



IN A NEW FORM. 

The American Manufacturer comes to 
hand in a new form. Its pages have been 
reduced about one half in size, making them 
conform to the ordinary magazine. There 
has, however, been no diminution in the 
character of the articles. They are as in- 
teresting and as timely as under The Manu- 
facturer's old style, which is, after all, the 
most important consideration in a trade or 
any other journal. 



WATCH THE MARKETS. 

The present year is not likely to witness 
the same sudden drop in values that 1900 
did, but he is a wise merchant who keeps 
his stock prepared for eventualities. Keep 
your stock nicely sorted and watch the 
markets closely is the advice we would give 
members of the trade. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE LATE MR. F. S. FOSTER. 



Colin McArthur, and Miss McArthur, the 
office and travelling staff. 



THE death of Mr. Francis Stuart Foster, 
of the firm of The Watson, Foster Co., 
wall paper manufacturers, Montreal, 
which occurred at his late residence, 904 
Dorchester street, Montreal, on Sunday, 
January 6, 1901, deprived Canada's busi- 
ness community of one of its most respected 
members and cut short one of the most 
promising business careers that could be 
prophesied for a young man. 

Although he had acquired a leadership in 
his line of business, Mr. Foster had not had 
an exceedingly long experience, being born 
only somewhat over 41 years ago in 
Kingston. He received his education in 
the " Limestone City," attending the High 
School there, previous to the family's 
removal to Montreal. 

It was in 1880 that Mr. Foster first became 
connected with the wall paper business, 
entering the firm of Watson & McArthur, 
which had just been formed, as bookkeeper. 
Four years later Mr. McArthur withdrew and 
the business was carried on by John C. 
Watson & Co. In 1891 Mr. Foster really 
entered into partnership in the firm, but not 
till 1894 did his name appear in the firm's 
style. In 1897 the business was formed 
into a joint stock company and the trading 
title has since been The Watson, Foster 
Co., Limited. 

Mr. Foster's special duties belonged to 
the manufacturing part of the establishment, 
and he had acquired a thorough knowledge 
of the practical side of the business. In 
fact, to his ingenuity and enterprise is 
largely due the excellence which Canadian 
wall paper manufactories have learned to 
give to their products since they started to 
learn their business in 1880, on the adoption 
of the National Policy. Canadian mer- 
chants long found difficulty in selling the 
domestic- made wall decoration, but, thanks 
to the zeal and perseverance of such 
pioneers in the industry as Mr. Foster, we are 
now not only supplying our own trade, but 
entering into the export business as well. 

Mr. Foster's influence extended into the 
office also, where his grasp of financial 
questions and his business ability of no 
mean order were valued very highly. 
Honesty and intergity were equally pre- 



dominant with enterprise in his make-up. 
An example of his high principle, which he 
never would allow to be published, was 
shown one time, when, about eight months 
after he had made a settlement with an 
insurance company upon some losses the 
firm had sustained through fire, he found a 
mistake had been made in the valuation of 
some factory apparatus, and his firm sent 
the insurance company a cheque for $800. 
Acting upon such principles as actuated 
them in this case, he and his partners 
builded even better than they knew, and 
their business expanded to enormous pro- 
portions. 

As a man, few business figures were held 
in respect equal to that enjoyed by Mr. 
Foster. Although he was very attentive to 
his private business, he had for some years 
been a member of the Montreal Board of 
Trade. He was a governor of the Montreal 
General Hospital and a warden of Christ 
Church Cathedral. His personality was 
affable, yet always impressive. 

Mr. Foster had been away from business 
two years and eight months, seeking a 
recovery of health in different climes, but 
it was only during the last two months of 
his life he was seriously ill. He leaves a 
family of a widow and three children who, 
needless to say, have the warmest sympathy 
of his hosts of business friends. 

The funeral service, rendered in the 
Cathedral in full chorus, was very impres- 
sive. The chief mourners were the two 
young sons of the deceased ; Mr. W. Foster, 
brother ; Mr. W. I. Gear, brother-in-law ; 
Messrs. Hugh Watson and D. S. Boxer, 
partners of the deceased, and Wm. Cooper. 
Among the others present were : Sir M. W. 
Tait, Messrs. Alfred .Griffin, George Creak, 
Capt. Riley, H. Adams, E A. Barton, J. 
H. Hutchison, M. Fitzgibbon, David Smith, 
R. J. Notan, Lieut. Col. Butler, C. Richards, 
H. Ryan, George Howard, J. Fraser, C. P. 
Greaves, R. K. Howland, C. C. Howland, 
H. H. Howland. There was a large num- 
ber of floral tributes sent by the immediate 
relatives of the deceased, and from Mr. and 
Mrs. W. B. Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh 
Watson, G. Howland, Son & Co., Madame 
M. J. A. Prendergast, Cadieux & Derome, 



HAD IT ONLY BEEN CANADA! 

IT appears that, owing to the inability to 
maintain a comfortable temperature, it 
has been found necessary to close a 
number of schools in the United States. 
The cause, however, appears to be due 
more to lack of knowledge in regard to 
manipulation of furnaces and other heating 
apparatus than to the severity of the weather. 

But we wonder what newspapers in the 
United States would have said had such a 
thing happened in Canada ? They would 
certainly have said a great deal and em- 
phasized it with headlines out of all propor- 
tion to the importance of the matter. 

Canada has one of the best climates in 
the world, but one would imagine, from the 
statements made at times by sensational 
journals, that it was an annex of the North 
Pole. 



A BUSINESS MAN'S ELECTION. 

The election of Mr. George H. Gooderham 
as Public School Trustee in Ward 3, Toronto, 
is a matter for congratulation. 

He is not only a young man of means 
and energy, but he is a business man and 
the descendant of a family which for more 
than half a century has exerted a great deal 
of influence upon the commercial career of 
the " Queen City." 

It is to be hoped that more men of his 
stamp and ability will follow his example 
and allow themselves to be elected to 
positions of honor and trust in our various 
municipal institutions. 

The ward-heeler and the professional 
politician have had their day. It is now 
time that practical business men like Mr. 
George H. Gooderham superseded them. 



PRICE CUTTING IN DAWSON CITY. 

A despatch from Ottawa states that, 
according to recent reports received there, 
the large mercantile houses of Dawson City 
are engaged in a price-cutting war on the 
smaller merchants. The despatch need- 
lessly adds that the miners are making the 
most of their opportunity and are laying in 
large supplies of provisions at prices only a 
little higher than those charged in Seattle 
and Victoria. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



9 



NO INSOLVENCY LAW THIS SESSION. 

MR. FORTIN, M.P. for Laval, will for legislation now that there was two or 

not introduce his insolvency bill three years ago, and that "eminent legal 

in Parliament during the coming authorities are unable to see how the posi- 

session. This is the report that comes from tion of creditors in insolvency cases could 

Ottawa, and it has been confirmed by the be improved by a Dominion Insolvency 

^ gentleman in question to a representative of Law." These are purely makeshift ex- 

this paper. cuses. 

We learn that Mr. Fortin considers it In reply to the latter argument, all we 

useless to press his measure upon the have to say is that Mr. Fortin, M.P., a 

House, thinking it foredestined to defeat. learned and practical Canadian jurist, has, 

He says the banks are strongly opposed to in his insolvency bill, offered a remedy and 

it, the Maritime Provinces are giving it the it is idle talk to say a remedy cannot be 

cold shoulder, and the commercial organi- found, 

zations are only lukewarm in their support. The argument that we stand in less need 

If these be the true considerations that of such legislation than we did some years 

weighed with Mr. Fortin when he was a g°. carries as Uttle wei g ht - Happily, 

making his decision, it is truly unfortunate times have improved and failures are fewer, 

that he should not have been given more but insolvency legislation is not to prevent 

encouragement, for our business men and failures. Men still get into difficulties and 

manufacturers are laboring under a veritable win so l° n g as business lasts. When they 

curse in being ill-provided with insolvency do - we want that creditors should get what 

legislation. What with slow settlements, the V should out of the estate and that as 

exorbitant legal charges, the custom of speedily as possible. A case just came to 

giving preferences and numerous subter- our notice recently in which the settlement 

fuges, a debt against an insolvent's estate is sheet of insolvent shows all the proceeds to 

worth very little. And, in Ontario, a man have been gobbled up in winding-up ex- 

cannot be compelled to assign. Nor would P enses - Not even one cent was saved t0 

it be allowable in the other Provinces, if the P a V on the rent account, and, of course, the 

law were tested, for the Federal Govern- ordinary claimants got nothing. And this 

ment is the only body constitutionally pro- occurs frequently. 

vided with the power to pass legislation for 0ur business men are crying out for in- 
such a purpose. That is why we want a solvency legislation and they must have it 
Dominion measure, and the boards of trade t0 save themselves and our national repu- 

and other bodies interested should immedi- tation. 

ately agitate to have the matter discussed in PRICES ON PARIS GREEN. 

the House during the coming session. It is The opening prices on paris green have 

a disgrace to Canada, to say nothing of the Deen announced by the manufacturers, 

loss of trade, to have our insolvency laws Compared with last year, they are slightly 

advertised in the columns of English papers lower. The figures are as follows : 

as they have been during the past few Per lb. 

Barrels i6%c. 

years. If we are so desirous of encouraging Kegs 17 

_ '• , , _ . , 50 and 100-lb. drums 17 % 

English trade as to adopt a preferential 25-lb. drums 18 

tariff, we should not be unmindful of the \^Va. tins?...! ....... ............. ig'A 

fact that we can mightily improve our * ;{j; ^ e,s ,\;/"/.\\\..\ \\ 1°% 

^ business reputation in England by improved Prices are guaranteed up to the time of 

insolvency legislation. shipment. On the strength of this, a few 

The Montreal Chambre de Commerce is orders have been booked during the week. 

hitting the nail on the head when it 

approaches the Government on the matter, TIME FOR STOCK-TAKING, 
for it would appear that Mr. Fortin' s ardor Now is a good time for careful stock- 
has received a severe dampening in Ottawa. taking. Every merchant should take 
The Government organs say that times advantage of the comparative quiet which 
have improved, that there is not the need prevails at this season to find out just what 



stock he has on hand, in order that he may 
know just what is his financial standing. 
Laxity in this regard is a mistake. 



DANGEROUS OUTSIDE VENTURES. 

EVERY business man should think not 
only once or twice, but several times, 
before he branches out in some 
venture other than that in which he is im- 
mediately engaged. Even merchants with 
liberal capital cannot afford to ignore this 
principle, for, while their business may not 
be directly affected thereby, the old maxim 
in regard to too many irons being in the 
fire still holds good. 

But, when merchants with but a moderate 
amount of capital take a part of the same to 
invest in something altogether aside from 
their regular business they are simply 
courting suicide. And then, this is a prac- 
tice that is all too common. Not satisfied 
with the volume of business they are doing, 
or the profits they earn, they are induced to 
lend their time and money to some scheme 
or schemes which usually promise well but 
turn out bad. 

If the business in which a man is engaged 
is not, for one or more reasons, to his liking, 
it is better that he should go out of it 
altogether than he should, while trying to 
retain it, devote a part of his time to another 
concern. 

We have in mind at the moment a retail 
merchant who was doing a nice business 
and seemed prosperous. Being fond of 
horses he gradually drifted into speculation 
in them. Now his business is gone and he 
is in financial difficulties. This is only one 
of many similar instances that might be 
cited. 

The successful man to-day is he who 
gives his undivided attention to the business 
in which he is engaged. There is no other 
alternative, for divided attention is like 
trying to travel simultaneously on two roads 
in order to reach a given point. 



A WEAK TIN MARKET. 

Pig tin has been the feature of the metal 
market for several days past. 

Last week closed with prices much lower 
in both London and New York than they 
were at the opening. When the market 
opened this week the tendency was still 
downward, but at the time of writing the 
tone is steadier. 

In Canada there have been some fluc- 
tuations, but quotations are much the same 
as they were a week ago. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SLOW DELIVERIES OF ENGLISH CUTLERY. 



DURING the past year, the Canadian 
cutlery importers have not found the 
deliveries of English goods to 
improve, and the old grievance of slow 
delivery still exists. In many cases, it 
exists in an aggravated form. 

So slow have the deliveries of some 
Sheffield manufacturers been during the 
last 12 months that agencies of 20 years' 
standing have been given up, and importers 
here who have a connection with the trade 
are concluding that the best firm to repre- 
sent is that which gives the speediest 
deliveries. It has not been an uncommon 
thing lately for wholesalers to have to wait 
for 9 to 10 months to have orders filled. 
Naturally, this is an inconvenience, when it 
is taken into account that they do not wait 
nearly as long on any other class of impor- 
tations. 

The tendency to give the house which 
gives the quickest deliveries the preference 
is growing, and agents who have repre- 
sented firms whose goods have given entire 
satisfaction when at last they arrived here 
have been compelled, for the sake of getting 
deliveries in a reasonable time, to transfer 
their allegiance to speedier cutlery lords. 

Although the Sheffield manufacturers 
have been seriously handicapped in their 
productions this year by the South-African 
War, which called out a large number of 
their men, the entire cause of the slow 
delivery evil this year is not to be laid at 
the doors of the War Office. 

If ever a remedy is to be applied to put 
this business on a proper footing, it must 
first be applied in Sheffield itself where the 
whole scheme of manufacturing must be 
changed. The Sheffield manufacturer must 
first learn — and learn from the simplest 
rudiments up — that speedy deliveries are 
not only desirable, but also necessary to 
stimulate trade. This he does not realize 
at the present moment. So long as he has 
enough orders on hand to keep his works 
running he does not appear to worry ; a 
pile of unfilled orders does not cause him 
an anxious thought as it would an American 
manufacturer, who would immediately in- 
crease his capacity to keep his business up- 
to date. So long as he has orders on hand 
the Sheffield manufacturer rests as easy as 
do his employes, who invariably neglect 
their work to see a football or cricket match. 
They say it is not an uncommon thing to 
see the works closed down entirely for a 
half day for some more or less important 
sporting event. 

Of course, a certain latitude must be 
allowed the English manufacturer, for his 
trade extends over an area measured only 



by the limits of the east and the west, and 
the number of patterns used the world over 
is so enormous that stocks cannot be kept 
to fill orders. But three or four months 
ought to be sufficient time to fill any order 
that is going to be filled, and when more 
than double this time is habitually taken, 
the complaints are well grounded. 

The prices of English cuttlery have 
advanced during the past season, probably, 
from 5 to 10 per cent, all around. A Can- 
adian agent, who has lately been in Sheffield 
two or three weeks, says that while he was 
there ebony advanced 75 per cent., bone 
over 100 per cent., pearl very materially; 
grinders and hafters were given a 10 per 
cent, increase in wages, and so scarce was 
labor that it was difficult to have cheap 
cutlery made at all. It is the general 
opinion that prices are up to stay, and that 
there will be no receding from the new 
values. 



A GOOD ANNIVERSARY NUMBER. 

The Age of Steel, St. Louis, Mo., is to 
be congratulated on the number which 
marks its 43rd anniversary. Few trade 
journals can boast a better advertising pat- 
ronage, a more comprehensive and up-to- 
date news and editorial service, or a more 
attractive appearance than our St. Louis 
contemporary presents in this issue. The 
subjects discussed cover practically every 
branch of the steel industry, from the iron 
ore transportation problem to a comparison 
between the steel industry of America and 
Europe. Several of the articles are well 
illustrated. 



E. W. GILLETT'S CALENDAR. 

The calendar which E. W. Gillett is 
sending out this year is one of the striking 
productions of the season. The design is 
of a laughing negro boy, straddled over 
some packages of Gillett' s goods, on one 
of which in large letters is the notice : 
" Gillett' s Lye Eats Dirt." The calendar 
pad is big enough to be useful in any office 
or room. 



HARDWARE SPECIALTIES HIS LINE. 

Mr. James Burridge, Winnipeg, who is 
opening up an agency business in that city, 
has been in Toronto on a visit. Mr. 
Burridge has been a resident of Winnipeg 
for 20 years, and for some time was the 
manager of the branch business of The 
Gurney-Tilden Co., Hamilton. He severed 
his connection with that firm in May. He 
is starting up on his own account, and is 
prepared to accept the agency of manufac- 
turers of hardware specialties. 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

J- J. Brownley, stove and tinware dealer, 
Halifax, is reported to have left 
• Halifax, and his landlord is in pos- 
session. 

M. Forget, general merchant, St. Jerome, 
Que. , has assigned to Gagnon & Caron. 

Alfred Gibault, general merchant, St. ( 
Lucie de Doncaster, Que., has assigned. 

J. G. Terryberry, general merchant, Bur- 
ford, Ont., has assigned to Arthur G. Olive. 

Cooper & Co., bicycle dealers, Brantford, 
Ont., have assigned to John P. Hemphill. 

Jacob Lennis, hardware dealer, etc., 
Winnipeg, has assigned to C. H. Newton. 

A. W. Stevenson has been appointed 
curator of Wm. Rodden & Co., founders, 
Montreal. 

R. Bourcier, general merchant, Lefaivre, 
Ont., has compromised at 35c. on the 
dollar, cash. 

Eugene Guay, general merchant, St. 
Jerome (Chicoutimi) Que., fs offering 40c. 
on the dollar. 

Assignment has been demaded of Alf. 
Mercier, general marchant, St. Angele 
(Rimouski), Que. 

S. Renaud, general merchant, etc., St. 
Tite des Caps, Que., has compromised at 
25c. on the dollar. 

J. A. Andrews, tinsmith, etc., Kinburn, 
Ont., has assigned to W. A. Cole and a 
meeting of his creditors will be held on 
January 23. 

A meeting of the creditors of J. A. 
Schneider, tinsmith, etc., Thornbury, Ont., 
who has assigned to Andrew Grier, has been 
called for January 21. 

New copartnership has been registered 
by Joseph and W. J. Hunt under the style 
of Joseph Hunt & Son, general merchants, 
Mahon, Que. 

Chisholm & Copeland, general merchants, 
Grenfell, Man., have dissolved, and R. A. 
Copeland continues under the style of R. A. 
Copeland & Co. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Adams & Coate, hardware dealers, 
Kingsville, Ont., are about dissolving. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipmerm 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



Partnership has been registered by Girard 
& Roy, general merchants, Ste. Flore, Que. 

E. A. Walker, hardware dealer, Grenfell, 
Man., has admitted J. A. Walker under the 
style of E. A. Walker & Son. 

Hay Bros., founders, Portage la Prairie, 
Man., have dissolved. Edward Hay con- 
tinues. 

The Rock Island Hardware Co., Rock 
Island, Que., have dissolved, and a new 
partnership has been registered. 

James P. and Ralph B. Simmonds have 
registered partnership under the style of 
James Simmonds & Co., hardware dealers, 
Dartmouth, N.S. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The assets of T. Ross, general merchant, 
Aurque, Que., are advertised for sale. 

The assets of E. Huared, general mer- 
chant, Bonfield. Ont., have been sold. 

D. McCuig, dealer in agricultural imple- 
ments, Treherne, Man., has sold out. 

The business of John Wynn, blacksmith, 
Brussels, Ont., is advertised for sale. 

The assets of Alphonse Guimond, hard- 
ware dealer, Montreal, are to be sold on 
January ?.2. 

The assets of the estate of Hector Grenier, 
hardware dealer, Quebec, are to be sold on 
January 24. 

The business of James Elsey, harness 
dealer, Mount Brydges, Ont., is advertised 
for sale. 

The assets of C. Pearson & Co., general 
merchants, Cedar Hill, Que., are advertised 
for sale. 

The assets of B. S. Chaiffer, general 
merchants, Magog, Que. , are to be sold on 
January 21. 

Edgar Scott, general merchant, Halifax, 
is advertising his stock for sale under 
warrant of distraint. 

The business of the estate of Thos. Mc- 
Neely, general merchant, Ladner, B.C., is 
advertised for sale. 

F. I. Labrance, general merchant, Thet- 
ford Mines, Que. , has sold out his business 
and is applying for a hotel license. 

Schofield & Co., general merchants, 
Pincher Creek and McLeod, N.W.T., are 
advertising their McLeod business for sale. 

CHANGES. 

L. P. Venne is starting as hardware 
^ dealer in Montreal. 

J. W. Saulnier, tinsmith, Weymouth 
Bridge, N.S., is giving up business. 

D. A. Shindler has started as hardware 
and bicycle dealer in Atlin, B.C. 

Pepper & Stonehouse are starting as 
blacksmiths, etc., in Forest, Ont. 

Kersey & Kersey have succeeded Isaac 
Kersey as general merchant, Edy's Mills, 
Ont. 



Every Paint Dealer 
In Town 

can furnish lead and oil. Only one dealer in a town can furnish 

The Sherwin-Williams paint 

When you build a good trade on S.-W.P. no one else can satisfy 
the demand. The trade is YOURS. 

When you advertise S.-W.P. you advertise yourself alone. 

We give you the exclusive agency for your locality, and furnish 
you with ammunition for the hottest sort of advertising campaign. 

If you take hold with us you can get the lion's share of the 
paint business of your town. 

And all the effort you put into the work pays permanently. 
You can always keep trade that is once made. The quality of 
S.-W.P. does it. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



Nkto YORK. 
MONTREAL 



BOSTON. 
TORONTO. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY. 




Charles Hartleib, hardware dealer, etc, 
Zuricn, Ont., has sold out to Charles Greb. 

John Roulson, general merchant, Garnet, 
Ont., has been succeeded by Chas. A. 
Walker. 

H. S. Cook & Co. have started as 
manufacturers of stove polish, Yarmouth, 
N. S. 

Alton, Beatty & Alton, dealers in agri- 
cultural implements, etc., Sidney, Man., 
have sold their harness business to James 
Tait. 

FIRES. 

P. A. Allen and J. M. Gibson, black- 
smiths, and R. J. Nicholson, harness dealer, 
Brigden, Ont., have been burned out. All 
are insured. 

DEATHS. 

T. Rivard, of T. Rivard & Co., saddlers, 
Joliette, Que. , is dead. 

Thomas Gilbert, tinsmith, St. George 
East, Que., is dead. 

P. Gagnon, saddler, Three Rivers, Que. , 
is dead. 

J. Milton O'Brien, blacksmith, Richi- 
bucto, N.B., is dead. 



James Shea has started as harness dealer 
in Liverpool, N.S. 

W. A. Maclauchlan has been appointed 
agent in St. John, N.B., for the cutlery firm 
of Askham & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 



INQUIRIES FOR CANADIAN 
PRODUCTS. 

The following was among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the High Commissioner's office, 
in London, England : 

1. A London firm ask to be placed in communi- 
cation with Nova Scotian dealers in, and shippers 
of salted and dried codfish, packed in drums of 128 
lb. each. 

[The name of the firm making the 
above inquiry, can be obtained on applica- 
tion to the editor of Hardware and Metal. 
When asking for names, kindly give number 
of paragraph and date of issue.] 

Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
London, England, is in receipt of the 
following inquiries : 

1. A London house asks to be placed in corres- 
pondence with Canadian producers of lard oil. 

2. A manufacturing company wishes to hear from 
Canadian producers of crude asbestos suitable for 
spinning purposes. 

3. A Scotch cycle manufacturing company de- 
sires information as to prospects of securing trade 
in Canada, and invites correspondence from im- 
porters interested. 

4. An old-established timber merchant contem- 
plates adding a few lines of wood manufactures to 
his business, with which they could be advantage- 
ously worked. He would be pleased to hear from 
Canadian manufacturers equipped for export trade 



r2 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"FAMOUS" TRAVELLERS MEET. 

THURSDAY and Friday, January 3 
and 4, at the head office of The Mc- 
Clary Mfg. Co., London, were spent 
in most instructive talks among all their 
travelling men. Representatives came fj^om 
as far east as Nova Scotia and 
West, making a gathering of 2 
ested in selling *' Famous 



be calling on their various customers with 
their "Famous" popular and useful lines. 
Theyerritoicy will be covered by the 
tra»ejrers natfne.d below : 





w ith HeOTtouaVters at Montreal. — W. Owen, 
ova ScotiatfJew Brunswick and Prince Edward 
sland ; M A. St. Arnaud, Northern Quebec ; L. 
Tarletojjf Ottawa District ; H. LePage, Montreal 
d O. R. Anderson, Eastern Quebec. 
ith Headquarters at Toronto. — S. T. Smith, 
tern Ontario ; W. E. Bulmer, Central Ontario ; 



W.Jeffrey, Northern Ontario, and J. D. Laidlaw, 
Toronto City. 

With Headquarters at London. — E. H. Grenfell. 
Southern Ontario ; J. Chalmers, Northern Ontario 
Peninsula ; M. F. Irwin, Western Ontario Penin- 
sula, and D. G. Clark, London City. 

With Headquarters at Winnipeg. — J. Brockest, 
Northwest Territories, and Mr. Anderson, Mani- 
toba. 

With Headquarters at Vancouver, B.C. — T. R. 
Ella, Interior British Columbia, and N. R. Turner, 
Coast cities. , 



city and village in Canada. The meeting is 
an annual affair, to exchange views as to 
the best needs of the trade in different sec- 
tions of the Dominion and to recommend 
such changes and add such new goods as th©s«, 
trade requires. 

Needless to say that with such an enter- 
prising company the interests and wants of 
their patrons are carefully considered and 
changes made accordingly. 

As a result of this conference many new 
lines will be added this year and others still 
further improved, keeping the output of this 
company in the lead, as in the past. As a 
part of the proceedings some time was de- 
voted to new goods, which will include lines 
"of well-known refrigerators and oil stoves, 
besides other lines of Jiew goods. Much 
useful and instructive information was 
given by members of the home office, which 
will be beneficial to many agents by aiding 
them with many of their problems, Mr. Foot 
(manager of sales department) speaking on 
general goods and new lines, Mr. Herrick 
(superintendent of stove department) on 
stove construction, and Mr. Irwin (furnace 
expert) on selling and setting furnaces. 

On Thursday evening a banquet was 
given to the travellers and foremen of 
departments where some hours of social 
and instructive intercourse were spent. 

The toast to "The Queen" called forth a 
reply with a true patriotic ring, including a 
description of the visit of the Canadian 
officers and men to Windsor Palace and 
their reception by the Queen. 

The toast of " Our Guests " was replied 
to by representatives from Nova Scotia, 
Ontario and Manitoba, while other toasts, 
' ' The Office, " " The Factory "and others 
were responded to by employes in those 
departments. "Reminiscences" was re- 
plied to by one who has been in the employ 
of the McClary Manufacturing Co. for 
nearly 40 years and his description spoke 
volumes for the enterprise of this company 
In having grown from a few small wooden 
buildings to the many acres of busy depart- 
ments which it now covers. 

The McClary Manufacturing Co. have 
many surprises in the shape of new lines to 
offer their agents and it will pay to hold 
orders for spring goods until their travellers 
call. 

Immediately after the closing of the meeting 
on Friday evening the travellers took train 
for their various territories where they will 



IVER JOHNSON 



p 



ROGRESSIVENESS 

OPULARIZES 

RODUCTS 

ROTEOTS 

RICES AND 

RESERVES 

ROFITS 



The Iver Johnson Bicycle 

—is— 

An Honest Cycle at an Honest Price. 

Send for new illustrated catalogue showing new improvements. 

Harry Elkes and Major Taylor, Champions of the World, 
ride the Iver Johnson Racer. 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 

FITCHBURG, Mass. 



Branches— New York— 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 364 Main St. 



BOECKH'S 



80 YORK STREET 



The following are some of our best-selling lines. Write for 
our prices. They are the lowest, quality being considered: 



BUTTER MOULDS 

The Jersey oblong mould is 
made of the best seasoned maple, 
with patent adjustable screws. 
Special designs, names or initials 
made to order. 



CHURNS 

The Ash Dash Churn is made 
in 5, 7 and 10 gal. sizes. The 
staves are tongued and grooved, 
and the bottom is set well up in 
the body of the churn in such a 
manner as to make leakage im- 
possible. 



BUTTER BOWLS 

Made from the best sugar 
maple. Superior finish. Packed 
in racks, which prevents break- 
age in shipment. A sample 
order will convince you that it 
pays to sell our bowls. 



RAISIN SEEDERS 

The Perfection is made me- 
chanically correct. All working 
parts of steel, nicely tinned. 
They are simple, strong and 
easy to clean. 



CAN OPENERS 

The Peerless are well made, 
nickel plated, steel blades ground 
sharp. Packed one dozen in 
neat display case. Will open 
any shape or size can. 



MOPS 

The Star Combination is a 
leader. A!l selected castings. 
Well finished handles. Superior 
to any mop in the market. 



STABLE BROOMS 

Bass, Cane or Split Cane. All 
selected stock. Special sizes 
and styles made to order. 



DISPLAY TABLES 

Good displays are assured by 
the use of this useful and inex- 
pensive article. Write for our 
illustrated booklet. It tells you 
all about them. 



SCREENS 

Stained, oiled or varnished, in 
all the standard sizes. Do not 
place your order without first 
getting our prices. 



Boeckh Bros. & Company 



TORONTO, OPJT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 




37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 



HORSE 
SINGERS 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



No. 162.— 5-inch Wick. 








ECLIPSE" 4-inch Wick. 




HORSE CLIPPERS. 



No. 162.-^-inchWick with Stop Cock. 



"BORER'S" 

"Keen Cut." 

"Perfection." 

"Dandy." 

1704, Bali-Bearing. 




'NEWMARKET." 

CHICAGO FLEXIBLE -SHAFT HORSE CLIPPERS. 






No. 98.— To Swing with Rope. No. 98.— Standard Machine. The "LIGHTNING" Round Belt Clipper. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 
ARE RIGHT. 



Graham Wire and Gut Nails are tbe Best. 



WE SHIP 
PROMPTLY. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SEVERAL HARDWARE SPECIALTIES. 

HARDWARE AND METAL last week 
gave a brief history of The Smith 
& Hemenway Co., 296 Boadway, 
New York. It is now proposed to deal with 
some of the specialties it makes. 



No. 2000, Farmers' and Machinists' 
Universal Tool. — This is a combination of 
eight tools in one. The demand for a good 
farmers' and machinists' universal tool has 
steadily increased for the last two years, 
until this company has de;ided to put out 




No. 159, Model No. 5, shows their 
pattern, which was ready for the 
first of this month. We menti 
the points of superiority in fftisJTOx 
made entirely of iron andMteel ; icgp be* 
folded up and carried in the p 
special saw is needed ; any ordi 
or cross- cut saw may be used; accurate 1 and 
easily adjusted to any angle desired ; 
parts are interchangeable ; it is the only 
mitre box that will saw moulding of any 
width or depth. It is made only in one 
size. One of the strong features is that a 
carpenter can carry it to the top of a ladder 
and saw moulding with as much ease as he 
can with the ordinary mitre box fixed on a 
permanent work bench. It retails at a 
popular price. 

No. 1900 illustrates the celebrated Russell 



■Bill 

tj|d*esjt that mechanical skill can 
iroduce. *Thfc/is made from the finest 
quaMp^>f Brj6cran steel. 
Jn\>. 888/Bent 01 

4/ 



or Curved Nose Plyer. 



manufacture the Ajax, Eureka and Pipe 
Pullers. We are informed that they are the 
largest manufacturers of nail pullers, varying 
in price from the cheapest to the best grade. 
They are at the present time equipping a 
factory in the vicinity of New York for the 
ufacture of nail-pullers and a few of 
ei^hardware specialties exclusively. 

s company also puts out the No. 118 ,, 
peclal linemen's or electricians' tool with 
insulated handles. The beauty of this can 
be seen at a glance. 

The No. 427 is their special Ran-Tan- 
Ka-Rus Red Devil Razor, made from 60 
small wires, the blank of which is herein 
illustrated. This is a new departure in the 
razor world. We are told that they have 
been experimenting upwards, of four years 
to perfect this article. The value of this is 
that in hammering the wires together they 
make a perfect condensation of the metal, 
thereby insuring a Damascus effect. They 
positively guarantee that it is never neces- 
sary to hone this razor, and should it be- 
come worn sufficiently to require honing, it 
will be exchanged for a new one. It is 
beautifully Hamburg concaved with finely 
polished back and sides. 




This is especially adapted, so we are told, 
for electricians, machinists, textile mills, 
oculists and jewellers. The beauty of this 
tool can be seen at a glance. 




No. 1900. 



It would be well for all live, wide-awake 
hardware houses to keep their eye on this 
young firm. They are making their mark, 
and so deep that it will not be erased from 
the memory of the older hardware houses 
all over the country. The Smith & 
Hemenway Co. issue a unique catalogue, 
known to the trade as the " Green Book of 
Hardware Specialties," which will be sent 
gratis to anyone on application. 



Staple Pulling Button Plyer. It is a com- 
bination of seven tools in one, being two 
staple pullers, two hammers, two wire 
cutters, a wire splicer, a small wrench and 
a pair of flat-nose pincers. This tool weighs 
\y 2 lb., and no farmer or machinist can 
afford to be without one. It does its work 
perfectly, and is handy in the hands of any 
one. 

No. 805, Improved Hall's Compound 
Nipper. — This is one of the latest patterns 
manufactured under the Hall's patent of the 
Utica Drop Forge and Tool Co. This tool 
is too well known to need any further com- 
ment. 



No. 13, Diamond B. — The Smith & 
Hemenway Co. are owners of the genuine 
Giant Nail-Puller, and have, so we are in- 
formed, enjoyed the bulk of the nail puller 
business in this country. Owing to the 
increased demand for a cheaper tool, they 
have put out what is known as their No. 13 
Diamond B. In addition to this they also 



ANSWERS TO INQUIRERS. 

S. B. McC. & Co. writes: " Can you inform us 
where we can obtain Ladd's Discount Book, also 
price of same ? " 

[Remarks : Can any of our readers 
supply the desired information ? — The 
Editor 1 



WIREHOIOEBS 



«A!W DRIVE* 




BURNER GRIP j 
UR WIRE SPLICER' 



No. 2000. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

A GOOD ONE. 

WITH the birth of each new year it is 
the custom of many wholesalers, 
manufacturers and retailers to send 
out booklets, calendars, etc., to their cus- 
tomers and probable customers. Some of 
these are very attractive, dainty, and use- 
ful. Money spent on the majority is 
wasted, for many are consigned to the 



1901, advertising their famous productions. 
The illustration is a well-printed portrait of 
a pretty maiden. A copy may be had on 
application. 



MR. IRVING TO LEAVE TORONTO. 

Mr. John Irving, who for the past nine 
years has represented the Montreal Rolling 
Mills Co. in Toronto and Western Ontario, 
has accepted the position of sales agent with 



<C^ 



dealer named Gilmour sued Greville & Co., 
of Toronto, for an alleged debt amounting 
to #377.84. The case came up before the 
court of Kootenay county. The Toronto 
firm entered no defence, and a judgment 
was given in favour of the plaintiff with 
costs. Gilmour recently moved before the 
local County Court to have the judgment 
enforced. 

In his judgment Judge McDougall de- 
clares that the judgment of the British 
Columbkhs court has no force in Ontario, 
out that it could not have, unless 



the 









defendant had 
he writ. 



gone to Kootenay in 



ceC-A^Aftl 



waste baskeW^WC bf the tastiest and most 
novel sent out this year is the one gotten up 
by the Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
The cover is of white celluloid, on the front 
of which is printed a Union Jack in colors, 
and underneath the flag the words "Com- 
pliments Montreal Rolling Mills, Mont- 
real." The effect is very pretty. The 
most useful part of the book lies in the 
calendars for the four years 1901, 1902, 
1903, 1904, and its blank pages for memos. 
Those who have not received a book will 
get one by sending a request on a post 
card. 

A NEW CENTURY CATALOGUE. 

The Toronto Lead and Color Co., 
Limited, have just issued to their many 



ova Scotia Steel Co. , New Glasgow, 
and will shortly leave for New 
Glasgow, where he will in future reside. 

Mr. A. H. Hough, who has represented 
the Montreal Rolling Mills Co. between 



INDUSTRIAL GOSSIP. 

Those having any items o£ news suitable for this column will 
confer a favor by forwarding them to this office addressed 
to the Editor. 

The Canadian Electric Chemical Co., 
Limited, have been incorporated in Sault 
Ste. Marie with $100,000 capital to manu- 
facture alkalis, chemicals and chemical 




Montreal and Toronto, succeeds Mr. Irving 
in Toronto. 

Mr. Irving has a great many friends in 
Toronto who will regret his departure from 
among them. Hardware and Metal 




compounds, and all electrical, hydraulic, 
mechanical or automatic machinery. Pro- 
visional directors : Wm. V. Gibbs, Clayton 
E. Piatt, F. H. Clergue, B. J. Clergue and 
Henry C. Hamilton. 

A Vancouver despatch says that T. H. 
Davies & Co., iron manufacturers of Hono- 
lulu and Liverpool, have purchased Arm- 
strong & Morrison's iron works in that city 
for $250,000. 



No. 427. 



patrons a new century catalogue and price 
list, a most complete, handsome and unique 
work, reflecting much credit upon the 
enterprise and management of the com- 
pany. The paint, oil and varnish trade 
will, no doubt, obtain valuable information 
^ by keeping a copy before them. Any 
member who has not already received a 
copy will cheerfully be supplied with same 
upon application being made to the com- 
pany's office, corner Leslie street and 
Eastern avenue, Toronto. 

McCaskill, Dougall & Co., Montreal, 
have issued a beautiful, artistic calendar for 



joins with them in wishing him success in 
his new sphere among the " Bluenoses." 



AN IMPORTANT LAW DECISION. 

On Friday Judge McDougall, of Toronto, 
gave a decision of importance to business 
men. Some time ago a Rossland, B.C., 



BAD FIRE AT BRIGDEN. ONT. 

On Thursday, last week, the business 
portion of Brigden, Ont., was practically 
wiped out by fire. The flames were first 
noticed in A. Harkness & Son's general 
store, a wooden building, which was speedily 
consumed, and from which the flames soon 
spread. Harkness & Son's loss is placed 
at $10,000; insurance $5,000. 

Among the other losers were P. A. Allan 
and J. M. Gibson, blacksmiths; loss, $1,000; 
insurance, $400 ; and R. J. Nicholson, 
harnessmaker ; loss, $1,500; fully insured. 




No. 118. 



k; 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MONTREAL RETAIL ASSOCIATION. 



IT was a well-attended and enthusiastic 
meeting that the Retail Hardware and 
Paint Dealers' Association, of the city 
and district of Montreal, held in Monument 
National last Wednesday evening. President 

F. Martineau occupied the chair, and among 
those present were: Secretary Magnan, 
Treasurer A. Prudhomme, Messrs. Drys- 
dale, Surveyer, Colleret, Denis, Dufault, 
Mailhot, Millen, Surveyer, U. Granger, 
Nap. Granger, A. A. Wilson, Huberdeau, 

G. Prudhomme, Belanger, Ponton, Jubin- 
ville, Young, Chausse, Tremblay, Couillard, 
Papineau, Shea, Beland, Marceau and 
others. 

The meeting opened about 8.30 p.m., 
and until 10.45 P- m> the gathering indulged 
in a mild, sensible discussion of the present 
condition of Montreal hardware retailers. 

After the minutes of the la st meeting had 
been read and adopted, the president 
welcomed the new members and wished all 
present a happy and prosperous New Year. 
He said that the organization had already 
acquired a good deal of strength by pre- 
senting a long list of members. He out- 
lined the objects of the association and gave 
its raison d'etre, stating that it had in 
immediate view the discontinuing of the 
wholesale houses selling retail, and particu- 
larly selling retail at wholesale prices. He 
instanced the case of a man going to a 
wholesale fur establishment on St. Paul 
street and asking for a fur coat ; the first 
question put to him was : ' ' Who are you ; 
are you in business ? " The reply coming 
in the negative, he was politely referred to 
a retailer. ' ' Why should that not be done 
in the hardware business?" asked Mr. 
Martineau. He added that they did not 
expect to accomplish their objects in a day, 
but he felt sure that ways and means would 
be found of alleviating their grievances. 

The secretary read a letter from Jenkins 
and Hardy, the secretaries of the Tarred 
Paper Manufacturers, stating that the re- 
quest of the Retail Hardware Association 
had been laid before the manufacturers and 
that the latter wished to know, first, the 
names and addresses of the members of the 
retail association, and, second, what quali- 
ties of goods covered by the association 
were purchased in 12 months. 

This gave rise to a lively discussion in- 
dulged in by Messrs. Belanger, Prud- 
homme, Millen, Wilson; Surveyer, Drysdale, 
Lariviere and Huberdeau. Finally Mr. 
Surveyer proposed, seconded by Mr. 
Belanger, that the request for a list of 
members be complied with and that the 
manufacturers be asked to estimate the 
amount of goods sold by the members of 
the association for themselves, as they are 



acquainted with the purchases of the Mont- 
real retailers. This was adopted. The list 
of members now comprises 46 merchants, 
among whom are most of the important 
retailers of the city. Although this means 
more than half of all the hardware mer- 
chants in the district of Montreal, there are 
more names to be added. Here is the list 
of members as it reads at present : 

Martineau. F., 1381 St. Catherine street. 
Surveyer, E. J. A., 6 St. Lawrence street. 
. Prudhomme, A., 1940 Notre Dame street. 
Prudhomme, G. , 174 CerHre street. 
Belanger, E., 1213 NSrTe •ame' street. *~^ 
Drysdale, D., 648 Craig street. W*»*"* 

Granger, N.,262 Lagauchetierre street. 
Trudel; L., 1999 St. James street. 
Denis, L. N., 313 St. Lawrence street. 
Cauchon.O., 32481. Lawrence street. 
Denis, J. A., 235 St. Lawrence street. 
Huberdeau, J., (H. Lamontagne & Co.) St. 

Lawrence street. 
St. Amour, J. C, 927 Ontario street. 
Leblanc, A., Rachel and Rivard streets. 
Dufresne & Pratt, 135 St. Paul street. 
Desforges & Geoffrion, 123 St. Paul street. 
Provost & Baigne, 107-109 St. Paul street. 
Granger, U. , 1268 Ontario street. 
John Millen & Sons 1325 St. Catherine street. 
Tremblay, P., 2633 Notre Dame street. 
Lavoie, F. U. ( Pellascis Hardware Co. ) 1901 

Notre Dame street. 
Amiot, Lecours & Lariviere, 593 St. Lawrence 

street. 
Beland, C. J., 1379 Ontario street. 
Leroux, A., 192 St. Antoine street. 
Granger, S. J., 691 St Catherine street. 
Dufault, A. (Ed. Cavanagh & Co.) 24S3 Notre 

Dame street. 
Duval, J. A., 1313 St. Catherine street, 
- Watts & Mailhot, 1031 Ontario street. 

Noiseaux, L. N. and J. E., 2157 Notre Dame 

s treet. 
Granger, W., 1192 Ontario street 
Marceau, U. A., 3595 Notre Dame street. 
Sylvestre & Fils, H., 701 St. Lawrence street. 
Shea, J. A., 991 St. Catherine srteet. 
Magnan Freres, 306 St. Lawrence street. 
Jubinville, P., 352 Rachel street. 
Chausse, W., 947 St. Lawrence street. 
Ponton, L., 325 Notre Dame street. 
Couillard, L., 3174 Notre Dame street. 
Papineau, E. J., 1123 St. Lawrence street. 
Colleret, E. D., 25 St, Lawrence street. 
Papineau, Z., 3293 Notre Dame street. 
Wilson, A. A., 219 St. Paul street. 
Young, Geerge, 1888 St. Catherine street. 
L'Allemand, A., 2721 Notre Dame street, 
James Walker Hardware Co., Limited, 234 St. 

James street. 

James Robertson & Co. sent a letter to 
the secretary since the last meeting, saying 
they were in hearty sympathy with the 
association. This was read and received 
with appreciation. The reading of Messrs. 
Robertson's letter led to a discussion upon 
the association's relationship with the whole- 
salers and manufacturers. It was pointed 
out that the retailers wish the wholesalers 
nothing but good, but that they have some 
grievances which they would like the whole- 
salers to alleviate. The members of the 
association would like to meet the whole- 
salers and have a talk over the matter. It 
was decided that conferences were abso- 
lutely necessary and Mr. Larivierre's 
motion, seconded by Mr. Wilson, that the 
paper manufacturers be asked to attend the 
next meeting to discuss their common 
interests, was adopted. 

Mr. Beland moved, seconded by Mr. 



Mailhot, that the different members of one 
firm should be considered as units, having 
only one vote per concern and paying only 
one fee, any employe of a house to have 
a right to represent it if he possess creden- 
tials to that effect. — Adopted. 

Mr. Beland proposed and Mr. Gideon 
Prudhomme seconded a motion authorizing 
the secretary to send a list of members to 
all wholesale houses asking for such infor- 
mation. 

Treasurer A. Prudhomme submitted a 
financial report to the meeting showing the 
finances to be in a highly-satisfactory con- 
dition, a balance of $109.10 remaining on 
hand. 

•^Mr. Huberdeau brought forward a motion, 
which was ifteondejj by Mr. Gideon Prud- 
homme, thanking Messrs. Martineau and 
Beland for the work done on behalf of the 
association in visiting the merchants of the 
city and authorizing the treasurer to pay 
their expenses. 

"Not their champagne," interrupted 
Mr. Prudhomme, but, in spite of the objec- 
tion, the motion passed with applause. 

The next meeting will be held on Wed- 
nesday, February 6, when it is hoped that 
the tarred paper manufacturers will be 
present to confer. 



THE STEEL INDUSTRY. 

A lecture was given in the rotunda of the 
Toronto Board of Trade on Thursday 
evening by Mr. Walter Kennedy, mechanical 
engineer of the Cramp Ontario Steel Co., 
Limited, on "The Steel Industry of 
America." The lecture was under the 
auspices of the Canadian Manufacturers' 
Association, whose president, Mr. P. W. 
Fllis, was in the chair. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. John Henderson, of Henderson & 
Potts, Halifax, was noticed in Montreal last 
week. 

THE DEMAND EXCEEDED THE 
SUPPLY. 

One of the prettiest calendars in the 
metal and hardware trades this year is that 
issued by M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & 
Co. It represents an old-time coaching 
scene, and is done in natural colors. It is 
no wonder the demand has exceeded the 
supply. 

FIXING-UP TIME 

follows stocktaking and is the best time to put in 



- 




BENNETTS PATENT SHELF BOX 

and the 

KLONDIKE SAMPLE HOLDER. 

J, S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., Toronto. 

N.li. Don't forget we make bojfei tfffl I your pri'. 
si-MI sIlc.N Irjg. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HAD NO USE FOR ASSOCIATIONS. 

I HAVE heard of a hardware dealer who 
joined an association and then resigned. 
He explained the situation in this way : 
"I became a member and attended the 
annual meeting. There were a lot of good 
fellows present and we had a pleasant time, 
especially at the dinner, though I couldn't 
see why they didn't put it on the table all 
at once instead of bringing on parts at a 
time and making you hungry before the 
next dish came along. Still, it was a good, 
square meal and my ticket didn't cost me 
anything, so I enjoyed and thought the 
whole show was a success. But I figured 
up that the trip cost me pretty near $18 
and I haven't been able to see that I've 
sold any more goods just because I spent 
that money and joined the association. If 
you can show me that I'll get any of that 
money back by keeping on as a member, 
why, I'll do it, of course, but I don't see 
how I can make more money unless I sell 
more goods, and I'm plagued certain that 
the association hasn't helped me to sell a 
dollar's worth. Why, the other members 
are all dealers and do not have to buy my 
goods, so what's the use of my mixing up 
with people and spending money when they 
won't become my customers?" 

There isn't a bit of use, Mr. Amos Bach ! 
You're the kind of a man who puts the 
brake on a wagon going up hill, for fear 
the horses will have too easy a job and 
won't earn their oats. Keep out of the 
association until you have had a surgical 
operation peformed on your head, so that a 
few modern and progressive ideas can get 
in and stay. The association doesn't want 
you, anyway, but it does want live men of 
advanced and advancing thought, and 
when I attend or hear from the meetings of 
the next two or three months I expect to 
learn that all these men are active members 
but that the dead ones have been buried. 
— Exchange. 



CAT TAILS. 



Editor Hardware and Metal, — In 
answer to an inquiry of your correspondent, 
which appears in Hardware and Metal 
of January 5, asking where he can find a 
market for cat tails, I beg to refer the 
inquirer to Messrs. Gum Choo & Wun 
Lung, Chinatown, British Columbia. They 
keep the "Yellow Dog" restaurant, a 
celestial feeding joint familiarly known 
locally as the '•Stuffed Pup." Their 
patrons, it is said, will consume all the tails 
of the feline species which your Hartford 
correspondent can furnish. John Pigtail 
says: " Muchee plefer tailee catte to tailee 
oxee for soupee." 

Ski Hi. 

P.S. — Manx cats are barred. 



RAMS 





AI NTS 

ai^/rne paints that pay the dealer to handle, 
eca*rs£ they are high-grade paints for the 
le^t money. 

MSAYS PAINTS are not 

grade paints for fun, but for business and 
for money-making, for wear and tear on build- 
ings, or for competition with any paints made. 

RAMSAYS PAINTS are well 
advertised and are asked for. Consumers de- 
mand them because they know they are the best 
paints in Canada, and bring the best results 
from practical experience. 

Dealers should send in their numbers early 
to have color cards prepared. 



A. RAMSAY & SON, 



Paint Makers, 
Est'd 1842, 



MONTREAL 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER. 



U.S. Patent June 25th, 1895. 



Canadian Patent December 13th 18J4 




Made by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ont. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



FOR SALE. 



TINSMITH AND PLUMBING BUSINESS 
for sale cheap. A splendid opening in a Nova 
Scotia town. Address, jas. R. Gloster, Moncton, 
N. B. (5) 



AGENT WANTED. 



WE WANT TO APPOINT AN AGENT IN 
Canada to handle our well-known and re- 
liable Glaziers' Diamonds. Good connection with 
the paint and oil branch of llie hardware trade 
necessary. A Shaw & Son, 52 Rahere Street, E.C., 
London, Eng. (5) 

SITUATION WANTED. 

A YOUNG MAN WITH BEST REFERENCES, 
for seven years connected with the hardware 
business, having a thorough knowledge of book- 
keeping, would like to make a change. A week's 
notice solicited. Box 41, Hardware and 
Metal, Toronto. (4) 



J. H. Grout, of J. H. Grout & Co., manu- 
facturers of agricultural implements, etc., 
Grimsby, Ont., is dead. 



Book, Broom 

and 

Mattress Wire 

High Grade, Double Tinned. 



Fine Annealed Brush Wire 
Soft Coppered Wire 
Tinned Wire of all kinds. 



The Peerless Wire Co. 



Hamilton, Ont. 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January 18, 1901. 
niBDWARI. 

THE wholesale houses are devoting 
more time to getting ready for spring 
business than they are to pushing 
sales for immediate shipment. In shipment 
from stock, trade is quiet, but prospects for 
the season's business are bright. Prices 
are now being settled for spring goods, and, 
while they will be somewhat lower than last 
year in many lines, the tendency at present 
seems steady. American travelers have 
been here this week quoting values for 
spring, and, while a few lines are lower, the 
general list stands unchanged, with some 
lines 5 to 10 per cent, higher. They report 
trade on the other side to be flourishing, 
and the tone of the market firm. Steel 
has been advanced 20c. during the last two 
weeks, and structural work is about $3 a 
ton higher. They also report that angles 
and crowbars have been advanced in price. 
Locally, prices are not much changed. 
Stovepipes and stovepipe elbows are lower. 
The list price of two numbers of Stanley 



wood rules ha* -Ojeeri lowered to $10 for 
No. 66 and $6 Fof'iNo. 18. Agricultural 
wrenches have been "ch'anged to 60 and 10 
and 10 per cent, for the Province of Quebec, 
and 60 and 10 per cent, for j Ontario. 
" King Cutter" razors are now 'Selling at 
$13.50 for white handle and #12 50 for 
black. Screen doors and windows are now 
quoted at values somewhat below those in 
vogue last year, the manufacturers not hav- 
ing succeeded in forming a combine. The 
discounts on augers and bits have been 
changed, and the new rates will be found in 
our schedule. Open prices now prevail on 
coil chain. Shelf goods are moving fairly 
well and heavy goods very slowly. The 
rebate of 7}4c per keg on nails is not now 
being allowed the Montreal retail merchants. 
Barb Wire — A few carlots are selling 
for spring, but business is not very active. 
The price is unchanged at $3. 20 f.o.b. 
Montreal in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — The same remarks 
apply to galvanized wire. The feeling is 
steady and business fair. We quote as fol- 
lows : No. 5, $4- 2 5; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge 



$3.55; No. 9, $3.10; No. 10, $3.75; 
No. ii, $3.85; No. 12, $3.25; No. 13, 
253-35 ; No- H. $4-25 ; No. 15, $4-75; 
No. 16, $5.00. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is virtually 
nothing doing, 14 guage hay wire being the 
only line that is moving at all. The price 
is $2.80 per 100 lb. 

Fine Steel Wire — A small trade is 
passing at 17^ per cent, off the list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — There is 
always a little demand being experienced. 
Discounts are 55 and 2}4 per cent, on 
brass, and 50 and 1% per cent, on copper. 

Fence Staples — This line is featureless. 
We quote : $3.25 for bright, and $3.75 for 
galvanized, per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Business is quiet so far as 
carlots are concerned, but a fair number of 
small 25 and 50 keg shipments are being 
made at 52.85 for small lots and $2.75 for 
carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Gananoque, and St. John, N.B. 

Cut Nails — Business in this line is con- 
fined to small lots, which are moving as 
the consumers' demands compel pur- 



The ONLY ONE in the market is 

The "SAMSON" Seamless Milk Can Bottom 




MADE FROM ONE PIECE OF SHEET STEEL. 
Do not forget that it is the 

STRONGEST, CLEANEST 
and CHEAPEST t0 make U P- 

No Rivets in bottom to break away. 

No Sharp Corners on inside of can to allow 
of dirt or soured milk lodging. 

Takes one-half the solder to make a can 
that it does with a pieced bottom. 

All Bottoms of each size are uniform, being 
drawn by the same die. 

Large Roll Rim at bottom allows filled 
cans to be moved readily. * 




Patented 
July 23, 1900. 



Patented July 23, 1900. 
NO STRAINED METAL. 



WILL ALWAVS WEAR ROUND. 




oP 



Tinned Sheets for Milk Can Body and Cheese Vat Stock always on hand. 
pWrO DEC 13 19M 

El McCLARY IN/IF - ©. CO- 

LONDON. TORONTO. MONTREAL. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 



%£Tt 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



If a thing is first-class, a 
second-class man avoids it 
by instinct— without any 
reason— Apollo galvanized 
iron for instance. 

American Sheet Steel Company, New York. 

Representatives for Canada 

B. & S. H. Thompson ci Company 

26 St. Sulpice Street 

Montreal 

Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 Wellington street, MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

ihe CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, OHT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



chases. We quote as follows : $2.35 for 
small and $2.25 for carlots ; flour barrel 
nails, 25 per cent, discount; coopers' nails, 
30 per cent, discount. 

Horse Nails — The demand is fair with 
the discount unchanged at 50 per cent, on 
standard, and 50 and 10 per cent, on 
Acadia. 

Horseshoes — Business is still flourishing 
and supplies are light. We quote as 
follows : Iron shoes, light and me- 
dium pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.50; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 
2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.00 ; X L steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
#3.85 ; feather-weight, all sizes, $4.S$; toe 
weight steel shoes, all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. extra. 

Poultry Netting — Some business is 
being done at 50 and 5 per cent, for spring 
delivery. Travellers are meeting with fair 
success in this line. 

Green Wire Cloth — The price is steady 
at $1.35 per 100 sq. ft. with contracts being 
freely made. 

Freezers — Most houses are booking 
orders for ice cream freezers and quite a 
large number are being sold. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Open 
prices will prevail on screens during tbe 
coming season, manufacturers having failed 
to come to an agreement. We quote : 
Screen doors, plain cherry finish, $8.25 per 
doz.; do. fancy, $1 1.50 per doz.; windows, 
$2.25 to $3.50 per doz. 

Augers and Bits — The discounts on 
augers have been changed. The list adopted 
August 10, 1896, is still in use. Discounts 
are as follows : Augers, nut, short eye, long 
eye and boring machine, 60 and 5 percent.; 
millwright's and rafting, yjyi per cent.; 
Thompson's, 32^ per cent., and ship, 12^ 
per cent. Auger bits, 60 and 5 per cent., 
and wood boxes, sets of 9, $1.90 net, and 
sets of 13, $2.50 net; car bits, 45 per cent., 
and dowel bits, 32^ per cent. 

Screws — Prices are steady and a sorting 
up trade is being done. Discounts are 
as follows : Flat head bright, 85 per 
cent, off list; round head bright, 80 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 77 j£ percent.; round 
head brass, 70 per cent. 

Bolts — Trade is confined to sorting-up 
proportions. Discounts are : Carriage bolts, 
65 per cent. ; machine bolts, 65 per cent. ; 
coach screws, 75 per cent.; sleigh shoe 
bolts, 75 per cent. ; bolt ends, 65 per cent.; 
plough bolts, 50 per cent.; square nuts, 
\,%c. per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 4j^c. 
per lb. off list; tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; 
stove bolts, 67 j£ percent. 

Building Paper — Business on spring 
account is reported as being very successful. 



S ANDERSON'S STEEL 



THE BEST FOR 



Tools, Drills, 
Dies, etc. 

LARGE ASSORTMENT IN STOCK. 



A. C. LESLIE k CO. 

Canadian Agents, 

MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pun 



Foroe, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE 5. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada. 



ADAJl HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

We have in stock 

PIG TIN 
INGOT COPPER 
LAKE COPPER 
PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIBMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ORDER BY LETTER. 



If our traveller is not on hand when you are 
wanting goods you cannot afford to wait for him 
nor can you afford to pass us, by placing your order 
elsewhere. 

Letter orders are promptly and carefully filled. 
Our prices are the same whether bought from our 
representative or by mail, and the traveller gets 
credit for the sale in every case. 

There is nothing in the Varnish or Sundry 

Lines we cannot supply you. If you have not 
received one of our Store Catalogues and General 
Price Lists or our Lithographed Linen Store 
Hanger, write for them — mailed free for the asking. 



Si Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 

Large new stock of all leading lines. 
Headquarters for . . . 



Linseed Oil 
Paints 

Window Glass 
Building Paper 
Harvest Tools 



Screen Doors 
Lawn Mowers 
Cordage 
Paris Green 
Etc. 



Also large and full assortment of 

CUTLERY 



of all leading manufacturers. 



We quote : Dry sheathing, 30c. per roll ; 
cyclone dry do., 42c. per roll ; straw do., 
30c; heavy straw do., J? 1.40 per 100 lb.; 
I. XL., dry sheathing, 65c. per roll ; 
cyclone, tarred do., 50c. per roll ; tarred 
ordinary do., 40c. per roll ; tarred felt, 
$1.60 per 100 lb.; ready roofing, 2-ply, 75c. 
per roll ; 3-ply, $1 per roll. 

Rivets — A fair trade has been done 
in rivets this week. The discount on 
best iron rivets, section, cairiage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., 
coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off; copper rivets, 35 
and 5 per cent, off; and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5-lb. carton boxes, are quoted 
at 60 and 10 percent, off list. 

Stovepipes — Quotations on stovepipes 
and elbows are lower. In stovepipes, 5 and 

6 in. are selling at $7 per 100 lengths and 

7 in., $7.50 per 100 lengths. We hear that 
some houses are cutting on elbows; perhaps 
51.15 per doz. is a fair quotation. 

Cutlery — Only a small trade is being 
done in cutlery just now. " King Cutter " 
razors are now selling at #13.50 for white 
handles and $ 12. 50 for black handles. 

Builders' Hardware — Some American 
travellers have been here this week and 
quotations are on the whole firm. Locally, 



agricultural wrenches have been changed to 
60 and 10 and 10 per cent, for the Province 
of Quebec and 60 and 10 per cent, for 
Ontario. Stanley wood rules are changed 
in the list price of No. 66, which is now 
listed at $10, and No. 18, now listed at $6. 
Other sizes and discounts remain the same. 
Discount is 75 per cent. 

Cordage — The cordage market is firm. 
Manila is quoted at 13^°- P er 1°- f° r 7" x ^ 
and larger; sisal is worth Qj£c. per lb. for 
7-16 and larger, and lathyarn g'/ic. per lb. 

Spades and Shovels — The prevailing 
tone of the market seems to be a certain 
firmness. Discounts are 40 and 5 per cent. 

Tacks — Unchanged. A fair trade is 
passing. We quote : Carpet tacks, in 
dozens and bulk, blued, 80 and 5 per cent, 
discount ; tinned, 80 and 10 per cent.; cut 
tacks, blued, in dozens, 75 and 15 per 
cent, discount. 

Firebricks — A winter quiet now prevails 
in this line. The price is $18.50 to $26, as 
to brand. 

Cement — There is no demand being felt. 

We quote: German, $2. 50 to $2. 65; English, 

$2.40 to $2.50; Belgian, 51.90 to 52.15 

per bbl. 

MKTAU. 

The metal market is quiet, but the under- 
tone seems to be firm. 

Pic; Iron — The pig iron market is quiet 



and somewhat depressed at the moment. 
Canadian pig is worth 518 to 520, and Sum- 
merlee524 10525. 

Bar Iron — The market is steady at the 
moment. The ruling price is 5 1 . 65 to 5 1 . 70. 

Black Sheets — The inquiry is small at 
52.80 for 8 to 16 gauge. 

Galvanized Iron — Some import orders 
for spring are being taken. We quote : No. 
28 Queen's Head, 55 to 55.10; Apollo, ioj^ 
oz., 55 to 55. lot Comet, No. 28, 54.50 with 
25c. allowance in case lots. 

Ingot Copper — The ruling price is 1 7 # c. 

Ingot Tin — Values continue at the old 
level in foreign markets, and there is little 
business doing. Locally, Lamb and Flag 
is worth 33c. 

Lead — The market is steady with some 
transactions occurring at 54 65. 

Lead Pipe — There is nothing new to 
note. We quote : 7c. for ordinary and 
7#c. for composition waste, with 15 per 
cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — There is a little moving. 
The general trend of the market is strong. 
We quote as follows: Black pipe, V, 53 
per 100ft. ; #. 53 ! #. $3 I X, *3-i5 ! 
i-in., 54.50; iX.J6.io; \%, 57-28; 2-in., 
59-75- Galvanized, %, 54.60 ; M, 55.15 ; 
i-in., 57-5°: ll A. $9- 8 ° ; !^> *"-75 \ »- 
in., 516. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



1>1 



Tinplates — A small business is passing 
at $4.50 for coke and $4.75 for charcoal. 

Canada Plate — Dealers seem to be eager 
to clear out stocki. We quote as follows : 
52*5, $2.90; 6o's, 53 ; 75's, 53- 10; full 
polished, $3.75, and galvanized, $4.60. 

Tool Steel— We quote: Black Diamond, 
8c; Jessop's 12c. 

Steel — No change. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, J! 1. 85 ; tire, J? 1.95 ; spring, $2.75 ; 
machinery, 52.75 and toe calk, $2.50. 

Terne Plates — Business is at a stand- 
still in this line. We quote $825. 

Swedish Iron— Steady at $4. 25. 

Coil Chain — A few small lots are 
moving. Open prices prevail now. We 
quote: No. 6, 1 1 j£c. ; No. 5, 10c; No.4,9 %c. ; 
No. 3, 9c; V-inch, 7>£c. per lb.; 5-16, 
$4.60; 5-16 exact, $5.10; y*, 54.20; 7-16, 

5400; %, 53-75; 9-16, 53-65; H> #3-35: 

X, 53-25; H, 53-2o; i-in., 53- T 5- In c^- 
load lots an allowance of 10c. is made. 

Sheet Zinc — There has been no change, 
the ruling price being 6 to 6j^c. 

Antimony — Unchanged, at ioq. 

GLASS. 

Some houses are preparing to take import 
orders for glass, while others do not intend 
to adopt this course. The market appears 
to be in a good condition to buy. We quote : 
First break, 52; second, 52.10 for 50 
feet; first break, 100 feet, 53.80; 
second, 54 ; third, $4.50; fourth, 54.75; 
fifth, 55-25; sixth, 55.75, and seventh, 
56.25. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Trade is opening up early and well, and 
paint manufacturers are extremely well 
pleased with the volume of business already 
done. All lines show an improved demand 
this week. We hear that values for summer 
delivery of oil are lower this week. As the 
market is falling, we cannot but advise our 
readers to defer the making of contracts fo 
summer supply. There are no changes in 
prices to report. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, 56.75 ; No. 1, 56 37^ ; No. 2, 
56 ; No. 3, 55 62^, and No. 4, 55.25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 

Dry White Lead — 55-75 in casks; 
kegs, 56. 

Red Lead — Casks, 55-5o ; in kegs, 
55-75- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6^c; in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7%c. 

Putty — We quote : Bulk, in barrels, 

52 per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 52.15; 
bladders, in barrels, 5220; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 52. 35; in tins, 
52.45 to 52.75 ; in less than 100-lb. lots, 

53 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 80c; boiled, 83c, 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic less, 10 to 20-bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2C. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and Oihawaat 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

Turpentine — Single bbls., 59c; 2 to 4 
bbls., 58c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — 51.25 to 51.45 per gal. 



Experienced Builders 
Value 

EASTLAKE 
SHINGLES 

Galvanized or Painted. 

Because they are easier and quicker 
applied, last longer, and give better 
protection than others. 

Experienced dealers are doing a big business in these reliable shingles. 
They satisfy the requirements of those who want permanent fire and lightning 
proof roof protection that withstands all weather conditions and is economi- 
cally trustworthy. 

If you're not handling them, write us for Price Lists. 




METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited, >«»»• Toronto. 



Wholesale Manufacturers. 



Castor Oil — S%( to 9^c in wholesale 
lots, and y 2 c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47 >£ to 49c. 

Cod Oil— 32^ to 35c 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
52.75 to 54 50, as to brand ; coal tar. 53 25 
to 53 75 ; cotton waste, 4% to 5X C - f° r 
colored, and 6 to 7^c for white ; oakum, 
5^ to 6}4c., and cotton oakum, 10 to lie. 

Paris Green — Petroleum barrels, i6^c. 
per lb. ; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, I7j£c; 25-lb. drums, 18c; i-lb. 
packages, i8^c; J^-lb. packages, 2o}4c. ; 
1 -lb. tins, I9^c; J^-lb. tins, 21 yic. f.o.b. 
Montreal; terms 3 percent. 30 days, or four 
months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The scrap metal market is quiet and 
steady. Dealers are paying the following 
prices in the country : Heavy copper and 
wire, 13 to I3>£c per lb. ; light copper, 
12c; heavy brass, 12c; heavy yellow, 
Z% to 9c; light brass, 6^ to 
7c; lead, 2^ to 3c per lb.; zinc, 2^ to 
2^c; iron, No. 1 wrought, 513 to 514 per 
gross ton ; No. 1 cast, 513 to 5 T 4 ; stove 
plate, 58 to 59; light iron, No. 2, 54 a ton; 
malleable and steel, 54. 

PETROLEUM. 

Trade has fallen off slightly. We quote: 
"Silver Star," 15 to 16c ; "Imperial 
Acme," 16^ to 17'Ac. ; "SC. Acme," 
18 to 19c, and " Pratt's Astral," 19 to 
20c. 

HIDES. 

Trade is in about the same position as 
last week. We quote : Light hides, 7#c 
for No. 1 ; 6}4c. for No. 2, and 5>£c for 
No. 3. Lambskins, 90c 



MONTREAL NOTES. 

American building tools are firm. 

Stovepipes and elbows are lower. 

Nos. 66 and 18 Stanley wood rules are 
changed in regard to their listed prices. 

It is rumored that the wholesale houses 
are trying to fix the prices of axes. 



"King Cutter" razors are now selling at 
513 50 for white handle and 512.50 for 
black. 

Montreal retailers have been deprived of 
the rebate of 7j£c per keg that has re- 
cently been allowed them on cut and wire 
nails. 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 18, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

THE wholesale hardware trade is not of 
a particularly interesting character 
this week. Business can only be 
termed moderate, and the situation, as far as 
prices are concerned, is much about the 
same as a week ago. For prompt ship- 
ment the demand is light, most of the 
orders the travellers are sending being for 
future delivery. The orders for future de- 
livery are not, however, large, as a rule. 
Practically all the business that is being 
done at the moment in fence wire is for 
future delivery. The feature of the nail 
trade is the booking of orders for spring de- 
livery, a little business having developed in 
this particular during the past week. A 
few orders for future shipment are also 
being booked in harvest tools, spades and 
shovels, and churns. A little business has 
been done during the week in skates and 
sleigh bells. Payments are rather slow. 

Barb Wire — A few small lots have been 
booked for future delivery, but practically 
nothing is being done in the way of prompt 
shipment. We quote 52. 97 l A f.o.b. Cleve- 
land for less than carlots, and 52.85 in 
carlots. From stock, Toronto, 53 10 per 
100 lb. 

Galvanized Wire — Practically nothing 
is being done. We quote : Nos. 6, 7 and 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



8. #3-55'. No - 9. S3-i°; No -. IO - 8375; 
No. 11, $3 85; No. 12. $3 25; No. 13, 

$3.35; No. 14, $4.25; No - I S. M--75. and 
No. 16, $$. 

Smooth Steel Wire — A few small 
orders are being booked in oiled and 
annealed wire for future delivery, but 
nothing scarcely is being done in the way 
of prompt shipment. A little business has 
been done in hay-baling wire during the 
week. The base price is unchanged at 
$2.80 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Orders for future delivery 
have been taken during the past week, al- 
though not a great many. Business for 
immediate requirements is also light. Base 
price is unchanged at $2.85 per keg for less 
than carlots and $2.75 in carlots. 

Cut Nails— Immediate business is still 
small. For future delivery a little business 
is being done. The base price remains at 
$2.35 per keg. 

Horseshoes — Busines continues quiet 
at unchanged prices. We quote as follows 
f.o.b. Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, light, medium and heavy, $3 60 ; 
snow shoes, $3.85 ; light steel shoes, $3. 70; 
featherweight (all sizes), $4.95 ; iron shoes, 
No. 1 and smaller, light, medium and 
heavy (all sizes). $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4. ; 
light steel shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4 95. 

Horse Nails— Business is moderate. 
Discount, 50 per cent, on standard oval 
head and 50 and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Screws— Business is fair at the recent 
reduction. We quote as follows : Flat 
head bright, 85 per cent, off the list; round 
head bright, 80 per cent. ; flat head brass, 
77 }4 per cent. ; round head brass, 70 per 
cent. ; flat head bronze, 70 per cent.; 
round head bronze, 65 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — A fairly good trade is 
being done in bolts, and there is some talk 
of an attempt being made to raise prices. 
We quote : Carriage bolts (Norway), 
full square, 70 per cent. ; carriage bolts, 
fulls quare, 70 per cent. ; common carriage 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; coach screws, 
75 per cent.; sleighshoe bolts, 75 per cent.; 
blank bolts, 65 per cent. ; bolt ends, 65 per 
cent. ; nuts, square, 4^c. off; nuts, hexagon, 
4^c. off; tire bolts, 67 # per cent.; stove 
bolts, 67 >4 ; plough bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rivets and Burrs — These remain quiet. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on iron rivets; 
iron burrs, 55 per cent.; copper rivets and 
burrs, 35 and 5 per cent. 

r pe — The demand for rope keeps quiet. 
The hemp markets rule steady to firm. 
We quote as follows: Sisal, 9c. per lb. 
base, and manila, 13c. Cotton rope is un- 
changed as follows: 3-16 in. and larger, 



i6j£c; 5-32 in., 2i^c, and y% in., 22#c. 
per lb. 

Cutlery — Being between the seasons, 
business is naturally light. 

Sporting Goods — Very little is being 
done. 

Building Paper — Business remains 
much about the same as it was a week ago. 
Ready roofing, 3-ply, $1.65 per square; 
ditto, 2 ply, $1.40 per square. Quotations 
are f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, London. 

Green Wire Cloth — Some business is 
still being done on spring delivery account. 
We quote $1.35 per 100 sq. ft. 

Skates — A few of these have been going 
out during the past week. 

Churns — Some orders are being booked 
for spring delivery. 

Spades and Shovels — There is just the 
usual trade being done for immediate 
requirements, and a few orders are being 
booked for future delivery. Discount 40 
and 5 per cent. 

Harvest Tools — Orders for spring de- 
livery are being booked, and with rather 
more freedom than immediately preceding 
the holidays. Discount 50, 10 and 5 per 
cent. 

Poultry Netting — Orders for future 
delivery are being booked with some free- 
dom. Discount on Canadian make 50 and 
5 per cent. 

Cement — There is nothing doing. We 
nominally quote in barrel lots : Canadian 
Portland, $2.80 to $3 ; Belgian, #2.75 to $3; 
English do., $3 ; Canadian hydraulic 
cements, #1.25 to 81.50; calcined 'plaster, 
$1.90 ; asbestos cement, $2.50 per bbl. 

METALS. 

The metal markets are quiet, and, with 
the exception of lead, steady. 

Pig Iron — Very little business is being 
done, but prices rule steady. The Cana- 
dian furnaces are quoting $17 for No. 2 in 
100 ton lots. 

Bar Iron — The demand continues fairly 
brisk at $1.65 to gi.70 per 100 lb. 

Pig Tin — The outside markets are at the 
moment steady, but they have ruled weak, 
some sharp declines having taken place, 
particularly in London, Eng. Trade, locally, 
while not large, is fair for this time of the 
year. We quote 32 to 33c. as the ruling 
price. 

Tinplates — Coke plates are 15 to 25c. 
lower. The demand has improved. We 
now qnote bright coke plates as follows : 
I.C., usual sizes, $4.15 ; I.C., special sizes, 
base, $4 5°; 20x28, $8.50. 

Tinned Sheets — The demand is more 
active than it was. 

Terne Plates — Trade is quiet and 
featureless. 

Black Sheets — Business is rather quiet. 
We quote $3.50 per 100 lb. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and ts. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



iCOVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.V. 

YANKEE SNAPS. 

Made in all styles and sizes. 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 




I 
J 




PRIEST'S CLIPPERS, f 

" /ARE THE BEST. A I 

Hlgheat Quality Grooming 
Sheep-Shearing Machlnet. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

6ETD FOB CATALOGUE TO 
••irliu Skearw Bft. Co.. Ha>haa. H.H..D81 



* 



Oon't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINCS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
'wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



HORSE 
CLIPPERS 

as 
ip the 



BJRMAN & SONS', LIMITED 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Russia's Stables and Fie'd Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 

BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 

B. S. VANTUYL, - Petrolia, Ont 

Pullman Sash Balance Co, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester, N.Y.. U.S.A. 

On tale all round the globe. 




f*\ 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



Galvanized Sheets— Orders are being 
booked for spring and summer delivery, 
and business is, on the whole, fairly good. 
We quote English at $4.75 and American 
at $4.50. 

Canada Plate — Dealers are beginning 

to book for delivery next fall, and quite a 

few orders have been booked. We quote : 

All dull, $3.15 ; half and half, $3.25; 

' and all bright, $3 85 to $4. 

Iron Pipe — A fairly good trade is still to 
be noted. We quote : Black pipe % in., 
$3.00 ; i/ s in., 83 00 ; yi in., $3 05 ; ^ 
in., $3.20; 1 in., $4 60 ; i# in., #6.35 ; 
ij^in., $7.55; 2 in., $10.10. Galvanized 
pipe is as follows: y z in., $4.6$; % in., 
*5-3S: 1 in., 57.25; \% in., $9.75; *'A in., 
$11.25; 2 m -> $ : 5 5°- 

Hoop Steel — Business is fair in this line. 

Copper — The demand for ingot copper 
has been active, and in sheet copper a fairly 
good trade is to be noted. We quote : 
Ingot, 19 to 20c; bolt or bar, 23^ to 25c; 
sheet, 23 to 23 %c. 

Brass — Business is quiet. Discount on 
rod and sheet 15 per cent. 

Solder — The demand is quiet. We 
quote : Halfand half, guaranteed, 19c; 
do., commercial, i8^c. ; refined, i8j£c, 
and wiping, iSc. 

Lead — Business is rather quiet. We 
quote 434' to 5c. 

Zinc Spelter — Not much doing. We 
quote 6 to 6#c. per lb. 

Zinc Sheet — A fair business is to be 
noted. We quote casks at $6.75 to $7, and 
part casks at $7 to $7.50 per 100 lb. 

Antimony — Business is quiet at 11 to 
11 J^c. per lb. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

There is a considerable increase in the 
orders for immediate shipment, but the bulk 
of orders are, of course, for spring delivery. 
Jobbers are looking for a big spring trade, 
though price conditions are quite changed 
from a year ago. It will be remembered 
that at this time last year prices were all 
advancing, and dealers bought ahead freely. 
This year prices are high now, and some 
buyers are holding off for lower prices. 
There is no definite assurance of a decline, 
however, except in linseed oil, which, in 
any; case will not reach its low point till 
May. English oil is being sold for May 
shipment (which means arrival here about 
July 1) at 63c. Canadian crushers have 
placed contracts for seed which will make 
67c. a possible price in May. At the 
moment, all lines are firm and there is little 
prospect of an immediate change. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6 87^; No. 1, $6.50; No. 2. $6.12^; 
No. 3,$5.75; No. 4. $5.37^; dry white lead 
in casks, $6. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $5 to $5.25 ; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb. ; $5.25 to $5.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 7 to 7%c, 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 8 to 8#c. 



84,000 Daily Production. 
S Factories. 5 Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sale all 
over the World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70% of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 



Established 1773 



Manufacturers of Polished. Silvered, Bevolled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 
or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 
Designs on application. 
Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : 707 Cannon Street, London E.C — 128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow — 12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par dise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens." 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 



of every description. 

Reliable Tools at low prices. 




A. SHAW & SON, 52 Rahere St., Goswell Rd„ London, E.C. Eng The oldest house in the 
trade, lineal successors of the inventor and patentee, J. SHAW. 



White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.20; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.35; bulk in bbls., 
$2 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 lb., 
JJ2.15 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $3. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, #2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, £1.20 to #1.30 per 
gal.; No. 1 quality, $1 per gal. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 to 
\oy z z. per lb. and \oyi to 11c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 80c. ; 
boiled, 83c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 79c; 
boiled, 82c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 59c. ; 2 
to 4 barrels, 58c, to all points in Ontario. 
For less quantities than barrels, 5c. per 
gallon extra will be added, and for 5 gallon 
packages, 50c, and 10 gallon packages, 
80c. will be charged. 

GLASS. 

Trade is not active, though a fair num- 
ber of orders for spring delivery are noted. 
We still quote first break locally : Star, 
in 50-foot boxes, $2.10, and 100-foot 
boxes, $4; doublediamond under 26 united 
inches, $6, Toronto, Hamilton and Lon- 
don;terms 4 months or3per cent. 3odays. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

The market is decidedly quiet. Stove 
cast and No. 1 wrought scrap have declined 
5c. 100 lb. Scrap rubber is %c. lower. We 
quote j obbers' prices as follows : Agricultural 
scrap, 55c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 55c. 
per cwt. ; stove cast, 35c; No. 1 wrought 



50c. per 100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, io^c. ; heavy 
copper, I2^c. ; coil wire scrap, 13c. ; 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10 to 
\oyiz. ; heavy red brass, io^c. ; scrap 
lead, 3c. ; zinc, 2j^c ; scrap rubber, 6^c; 
good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c; clean 
dry bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 

PETROLEUM. 

A good movement continues. Prices are 
steady since the advance of j£c. last week. 
We quote: Pratt's Astral, 17 to \7%c. 
in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; Ameri- 
can water white, 17 to I7^c. in barrels ; 
Photogene, 16*4 to 17c; Sarnia water 
white, 16 to \6yic. in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, 15 to 1 5 yic. in barrels. 
COAL. 

There is practically a famine in nut size. 
The delivery of other lines is reduced by 
the shortage of cars. Prices are unchanged. 
We quote anthracite on cars Buffalo and 
bridges : Grate, $4 .75 per gross ton and 
$4.24 per net ton ; egg, stove and nut, #5 
per gross ton and $4 46 per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Scrap rubber has declined }4c per lb. 
Stove cast, and No. 1 wrought scrap iron 
are 5c, per 100 lb. lower. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co , agents for 
the "Micmac" hockey stick, report that, 
notwithstanding the large number they have 
sold this season, not one complaint has been 
received. They claim that the " Micmac " 
will stand more rough usage than any other 
stick. 



The merchants in many of the Manitoba 
towns and villages have instituted early 
closing. Moosomin, Man., has recently 
added to the number. The stores there 
now close at 6.30 o'clock p.m. every 
evening except Saturdays and days before 
holidays. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, January 15, 1901. 

THE hardware market, as far as 
Winnipeg is concerned, is remark- 
ably quiet at the time of writing. All 
the houses are busy stock-taking and pre- 
paring for the spring business. 
Price list for the week is as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb S3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

" 11 4 00 

12 4 05 

" 13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 4 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 45 

" 16 and 20 350 

10 3 55 

8 365 

6 3 7° 

4 3 85 

3 4 1° 

Cut nails, 30 to bo dy 300 

20 to 40 3 05 

" 10 to 16 310 

8 3 15 

6 3 20 

4 3 3° 

3 3 65 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 495 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.50 basis. 
Swedish iron, $4.50 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 00 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 °° 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28 gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 14 75 

Ingot tin 35 

Canadaplate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 75 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $10 00 

H 10 50 

" % and 5-16 11 00 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 13 50 

y& 14 00 

5i and 5-16 1450 

Solder 21 l A 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 16 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 p.c. 

Flat ' ' brass 70 p c. 

Round " " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57K p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 42 K p.c. 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 5° P c - 

Copper, No. 8 50c. lb. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 5°. and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 5° 

No. 2 r 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 



Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells: 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

American, M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 75 

Chilled 750 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

" plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



PETROLEUM. 



Water white American 
Prime white American. 
Water white Canadian . 
Prime white Canadian. 



24MC. 
23c 
2ic. 
19c. 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS 



Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 68 

Less than barrel lots 73 

Linseed oil, raw 87 

Boiled 90 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 25 !4 

Eldorado engine 24K 

Atlantic red 27^ 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23 1 /£ to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. 11 % 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 to 5° 5 5° 

51 to 60 6 00 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2K 

kegs " 2% 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 25 

No 1 700 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, .per gal. $1.30 to $1.90 

NOTES. 

Mr. Falls, buyer for Geo. D. Wood & 
Co., the well-known hardware dealers, 
returned from the East last week. 



THEIR 47TH ANNUAL REUNION. 

The employes of Caverhill, Learmont & 
Co. , Montreal, held their 47th annual din- 
ner at Her Majesty's Cafe last Friday even- 
ing, and not only was it well attended, but 
the evening was a most enjoyable one 
throughout. Previous to the dinner they 
were present at the presentation of " Car- 
men ' ' in the theatre, and shortly before 
midnight they assembled in the cafe, where 
an excellent dinner was served. The menu 
card was a characteristic hardware one. 

After dinner the chairman, Mr. James 
Reid, rose and proposed "The Queen," 
which was most enthusiastically honored. 
The other toasts were : *' Our Employers," 
proposed by Mr. J. W. Dowling, and 
responded to by Mr. Frank Ross Newman ; 
"Our Guests," proposed by Mr. G. H. 
Cornell, and responded to by Messrs. Wm. 
Percival, R. W. Garth and Wm. Grose, and 
"The Ladies," proposed by Mr. J. R. 
Terrill. Mr. George McGowan proposed 
the health of the chairman, and Mr. Reid 
ably responded. The health of Mr. John 
Gouldthorpe, one of the oldest employes, 
and who has attended nearly every dinner, 
was also drunk with eclat. During the 
evening songs were given by Messrs. R. 
Piatt, Alex. Bain, F. R. Newman, Jack 
Davidson, Fred Cockburn, Wm. Grose and 
Archie Macfarlane, and Mr. Dick Terrill 
gave a whistling solo. A vote of thanks 
was tendered to Mr. Wilfred Lawson for the 
able manner in which he had gotten up and 
carried out the dinner, and the proceedings 
terminated at an early hour with ' ' God 
Save the Queen." 



LudgerDoucet.sawmiller.Thetford Mines, 
Que. , has been burned out. 



HENDERSON & POTTS 

HALIFAX and MONTREAL. 

Sole Manufacturers iu Canada of 

Brandram Bros. 
& Co., London, Eng., 

B.B. 

Genuine White Lead. 

Brandram's Genuine B. B. is the best White Lead made. It is unequalled for white- 
ness, and fineness and body, and will cover more surface than any other White Lead 
Paint. It is the favorite White Lead in England, Canada, United States, Australia ) 
Russia, etc. Made by a special process, and is superior to all other White Leads for 

durability. 

SEND FOR QUOTATIONS. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE SPECIAL NUMBER 



*W OF 



The Hardware and 

Metal Merchant 

now in course of preparation, which 
will be issued March 9ii?, will be big- 
ger and better than any previous 
issue. 

In our new premises and with our 
new presses we have more room, 
greater capacity and better facilities 
for doing high-class work than for- 
merly. 

All our facilities and energies will 
be turned to account in producing a 
Special Edition of exceptional merit. 

The MacLean Publishing Co., 

LIMITED 

Trade Newspaper Publishers 

MONTREAL AND TORONTO 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



VIEWS ON THE PLUMBING 
BUSINESS. 

By John E. Allen, of Des Moines. 

WHAT are the conditions existing in 
our business to-day ? Is there a 
future for it in the professions or 
are we on the downward road to obliteration ? 
Are plumbing laws and inspectorship being 
a benefit to us or the public, and last, but 
not least, are we the only trade receiving 
the boasted protection granted by manu- 
facturers and jobbers ? Let us reason the 
matter together and see if our trade justifies 
us to devote the time and energy to it that 
is being done, and whether you or I would 
recommend our sons to continue in our 
footsteps by sticking to it through thick and 
thin. 

Gentlemen, it's a fact that the business is 
in worse condition today than it has ever 
been and the future is not very bright. 
There is no longer any protection to the 
master plumber in any manner that it may 
be received. I could not purchase goods 
from a grocer, jeweller or boot and shoe 
manufacturer or jobber by still remaining 
in the plumbing business, having a card 
and letter heads printed, stating that I 
carried the goods mentioned above and de- 
served wholesale prices and purchased suf- 
ficient only to supply my family for their 
immediate wants. I would be refused point 
blank ; this is protection that is protection, 
and it is right and proper that I should not 
be allowed to purchase at wholesale prices 
until there was no doubt in their minds that 
my intentions were honorable before quoting 
me prices, much less sell me the goods. 
Does this protection exist in the plumbing 
business ? No sir, it does not ! If an 
owner desires to furnish plumbing goods at 
wholesale prices, all he has to do is to have 
a bursted boiler painted, rent a store 
that has remained idle for some time 
with shelving already in, for 30 days pur- 
chase a number of cracked washnuts that 
can be had for the hauling of them away, 
have a card and letterhead printed and write 
the manufacturers and jobbers for prices, 
cash before goods are shipped, and he will 
not be disappointed in getting all he needs 
to finish his first and last job of plumbing to 
the injury and detriment of the legitimate 
trade. But no one can deny that under our 
present condition any manufacturer or 
jobber would call him a plumber and 
entitled to purchase goods. There is more 
of this work being done at the present time 



than has been known in the history of the 
trade. 

Every implement store has in stock, 
sinks, lead pipe, lead traps, bibbs, check 
and wastes and iron pipe, bench vise stock 
and dies, and are allowed to sell to anyone 
whether in the trade or not, gradually under- 
mining the jobbing part of the business. 
Under these conditions does it justify any- 
one to carry a large stock of goods when 
you can purchase in small quantities just 
as cheap, and save the interest on your in- 
vestment, insurance, etc.? You can pick 
up daily, any newspaper in your large city 
and see advertisements calling your atten- 
tion to cheap plumbing goods that your 
customer is posted on, and on account of 
the supposedly enormous profit in the busi- 
ness by some hook or crook they manage to 
get a catalogue and discount sheet. It is 
wonderful to see the number of plumbing 
and gas fixture catalogues that are carefully 
stowed away and treasured by your patrons. 

It is a household word with owners of 
flats, " buy from so-and.so Wrecking Co." 
How long such methods will continue and 
then that they will be allowed to progress is 
the question. No one will doubt but that 
the situation is a trying one, and calls for 
immediate action on the part of all the 
trade before it is too late. I fear though 
that our business will gradually fall into 
other hands and before many years. The 
business will be a side line taken up by 
other trades with more capital, so that they 
can carry larger stocks and fill the long felt 
want of the manufacturer and jobber in our 
line. I have no desire to prevent any am- 
bitious plumber from starting in the business 
free from restrictions. But I am strongly 
against usurpers being allowed to purchase 
goods at wholesale prices so easily ; in fact, 
it is the easiest business on record to pur- 
chase material if you have the cash. 

Some remedy certainly should be given 
us ; why not adopt the one successfully 
carried out by the jobber ? How many 
manufacturers will quote you prices and 
sell you direct, saving middleman's profit, 
and if they should, what would be the 
result ? 

The past year's experience certainly 
should prepare us all to settle this important 
matter once for all in a just and business- 
like manner, satisfying all and harmony 
and good fellowship exist forever. 

True there are other improvements neces- 
sary which relate to ourselves individually, 
which have puzzled us for years and one is 



ruinous estimating, or I might truthfully say 
guessing. Anyone of us certainly would 
prefer to figure with a competitor who was t 
conservative instead of the competitor who 
does not need to figure. We then stand a 
better chance of making a fair profit. — John 
E. Allen, in Plumbers' Trade Journal. 



A CONTESTED CLAIM. 

Lessard & Harris, plumbers, and L. 
Cohen & Son, coal dealers, both of Montreal, 
are contesting a claim for payment of certain 
goods which they bought from a clerk by 
the name of Marsily, in the employ of Mr. 
B. J. Coghlin. They gave the following 
account of the transaction : " Marsily left 
some samples of brass which he said had 
been consigned to a firm in Sherbrooke, 
who had refused them on 'account of 
quality, and that he was selling for account 
of the shippers, representing himself as a 
commercial agent. After 10 days of delay, 
it was agreed to purchase the goods at their 
regular market value for the purpose of 
remitting. The goods were delivered by a 
carter, who brought instructions from Mar- 
sily that he be paid $1-25. An invoiceVas 
presented and payment was made by 
cheque to Marsily' s order. The cheque, 
which was endorsed by Marsily, bears the 
imprint of a rubber stamp, ' George Marsily, 
Agence Commerciale.' This closed the 
matter so far as Messrs. Cohen were con- 
cerned. They have since been informed, 
however, that Marsily told his employer he 
had sold the goods on time, and that he had 
obtained Mr. Coghlin' s consent to do so. 
The goods were removed, as has been seen, 
by an outside carter whom Marsily repre- 
sented to have been sent by the purchasers. 
Neither Cohen & Son nor Lessard & 
Harris were aware of Mr. Coghlin' s interest 
in the goods, and only because so when 
they were asked for payment. Lessard & 
Harris have instituted a counter action 
against Mr. Coghlin." 



BIG LIGHTING COMBINE PROPOSED. 

According to a despatch from Montreal, 
Rodolphe Forget, president of the Royal 
Electric Co., of that city, is promoting a 
company to be known as the "Lighting and 
Power Co., of Montreal," with a capital of 
$25,000,000. It is proposed that this com- 
pany will absorb Chambly Manufacturing 
Company, the Royal Electric Company, the 
Montreal Gas Company, and the Lachine 
Rapids Hydraulic and Land Company, and 
thus control the lighting and power of the 



CANADIAN HARDWARE 




27 



Nippers and Plyers 

IS THE BEST GOOD ENOUGH FOR YOU ? 
ASK FOR THE GREEN BOOK. 

Smith & Hemenway Co., rTo c oL D co OP F0RGE 

296 Broadway, New York City. 



T> 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 220% Board of Trade. MONTREAL. 




HOR8E NAILS — "C" Brand Horse Nails - 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 
"BRA38ITE" COOD8 — Gunn Castor Co.. 

Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Manufacturers of 

Heating 
Supplies 

Pipe Fittings and Headers. 
Large Manifolds made to Order. 
Steam Traps and Appliances, etc. 




The 



Jas. Morrison Brass 

Mfg. CO., Limited 

— — TORONTO. 






WIRE RODS ! ■* ■ 

Drawn to Decimal Sizes, Cut and Straightened, 
In Uniform Sizes. Prompt Shipment. 



TRADE 



Chalcraft Screw Co., Limited, Brantford, Ont. 

JVobies 8f Mo arc. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 




Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



LEADER CHURN 

New Century Improvements. 

FOUR DIFFERENT STYLES: 

A— Steel Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
B— Wood Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
C— Steel Frame with Crank. 
D— Wood Frame with Crank. 

Styles A and B may be operatedfrom a sitting 
or standing position. 



Steel Frames and Hoops beautifully ALUMINIZED. 

All LEADER CHURNS are equipped with BICYCLE BAL L 
BEARINGS and PATENTED CREAM BREAKERS. 

Stands are so constructed that they are particularly strong 
and rigid, and there is nothing to interfere with the 
placing of pail in the most convenient position for drain- 
ing off buttermilk. 

It Pays to Have the Best. None are BetterThan the Leader. 

THE — 

Dowswell Manufacturing Co. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

;Eastern Agents: W. L. Haldimand & Son, Montreal, Que. 




HOW TO SAVE GAS Peebles* Automatic Gas Gove 



mors 




wiiiTiiiiiiiiia 
Gas, Fire and Stove Governor. 




House Governor Burner. 





Governor for Incandescents 



Mercurial Governor for Fixing at Meter 



Sole Manufacturers, D. BRUCE PEEBLES & CO., Tay Works, Edinburgh, Scotland. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



city. It is understood that several wealthy 
capitalists are behind Mr. Forget in his 
scheme. 

" 

MEETING OF BATHTUB MAKERS. 

A MEETING of the manufacturers of 
steel-clad, copper-lined bathtubs, 
all-steel enameled tubs and solid- 
copper tubs was held in Buffalo, N.Y., on 
Thursday, January 10. A rumor was 
current during the closing part of last year 
to the effect that higher prices would be 
announced at this meeting. This, it is be- 
lieved, will not be the case, owing to the 
fact that the manufacturers of enameled 
iron bathtubs have considerably reduced 
their prices, thus bringing the enameled tubs 
of the unguaranteed quality and the seconds 
of the first quality into close competition 
with steel-clad, copper-lined tubs. It would 
not surprise the trade if the price of steel- 
clad tubs was slightly reduced after this 
meeting. 

There is very little profit in the steel-clad 
tub at the present price, but if the manufac- 
turers intend to keep it in the market they 
will have to make some reduction, no matter 
how small, in order to keep the selling price 
at a safe distance from prices ruling on the 
lower grade enamelled iron tubs. That there 
will always be a market for a cheap tub is 
manifest to everybody, but it is not unlikely 
that in the near future this market will go to 
the all-steel painted tub. The present 
prices of the lower grade enamelled iron 
tubs and of full weight steel-clad tubs are 
so close together that the preference will go 
to the enamelled iron one, and, unless 
copper takes a drop in price, the steel clad 
copper lined tub may be put entirely out of 
the market. —Metal Worker, January 12. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

The Amherst, N.S., council have ap- 
pointed a committee to consider the advis- 
ability of erecting a new gaol. 

The towns and villages in Lanark county, 
Ont., have carried a by-law to have a House 
of Industry erected in Perth, the county 
town. 

The members of the St. John, N.B., 
Congregational church have decided to 
either build a new church or to make exten- 
sive repairs to the present one. 



TORONTO BUILDING PERMITS. 

Building permits have been issued in 
Toronto to The Wm. Davies Co., Limited, 
for a store building at the corner of College 
and Bathurst streets, to cost #3,600, and to 
W. S. Kellow, for a pair of two storey and 
attic residences, near Albany avenue, on 
Wells street, to cost $5,000. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Joseph Lafrance & Co., plumbers, Mont- 
real, have~assignVl^(. A 

Dupont & LeveiHe, plumbers, etc., Farn- 
ham, Que., have registered partnership. 

The Frankford Electric Ligbt Co. , Limited, 
Frankford, Ont., have been incorporated. 

Mrs. Felix Gaulin has registered as pro- 
prietress of F. Gaulin & Cie, plumbers, 
Granby, Que. 

The Brome Lake Electric Power Co., 
Knowlton and Waterloo, Que., have been 
incorporated. 

P. F. Moore and S. Walsh have registered 
partnership under the style of Moore & Co., 
plumbers, etc., St. John's Nfld. 

Paquet & Godbout, St. Hyacinthe, Que., 
have secured the contract for an addition to 
the Convent of the Congregation St. Hya- 
cinthe. 

The Methodists of Wingham, Ont., have 
given S. Bennett the contract for building a 
new church to cost #11,400, exclusive of 
seats and furnace. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

The contracts for plumbing and kindred 
work in the G.T.R.'s new freight sheds at 
Montreal, which aroused such keen interest 
in the trade in the Montreal, Toronto and 
other centres, have at last been let. The 
Bennett & Wright Co., Limited, get the 
contracts for heating, ventilating and 
plumbing, while the conduit wiring and 
electric lighting has been given to the 
Western Electric Co., New York. 



A CREDITABLE NEW YEAR NUMBER. 

The new Year number of The Plumbing 
Trade Journal, New York, is one of the best 
of the kind that has been issued by its 
publishers. Its cover is of exceptionally 
artistic design, and is printed and embossed 
in red, green and gold. In addition to the 
usual amount of reading matter and illus- 
trations, there are some excellent Christmas 
stories and poetry written especially for the 
plumbing trade. 



HARDWARE CLERK GETS A 
COMMISSION. 

W. R. H. Dann, one of the seven 
Canadians to whom commissions in the 
British army were granted recently upon the 
advice of the Earl of Minto, is employed in 
Geo. D. Wood & Co.'s hardware ware- 
house, Winnipeg. Mr. Dann, who is about 
25 years of age, is a native of Ireland, but 
has resided for many years in Canada. 



R. C. Cassady, dealer in agricultural 
implements, Boissevain, Man., has been 
succeeded by Owen Bell. 



1901 

A 

PHENOMENAL 

SUCCESS 

We are now booking the largest 
business in Ready Mixed Paints 
since the Company was inaugu- 
rated. The reason is not far to 
seek — The Canada Paint Com- 
pany are, veritably, the only first 
hands in Canada for painting 
material of every description. We 
manufacture every item from start 
to finish, consequently, we can, 
and do, give the best value. 

THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 



IF 

the best PARIS GREEN is requir- 
ed insist upon this Company's 
make. We manufacture guaran- 
teed Pure Paris Green. 



NONE BETTER. 


THE PAINT 


COMPANY 


CANADA I Hill I 


LIMITED 


MONTREAL 




TORONTO 





CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 




THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 




r^^SfT- 



SY 



Asbestos 
Disk 
Valve 

A First-Class 

and Reliable Valve. 




Also. 



The Fairbanks 
Standard Scales 

Pipe Fittings 

Pipe and Mill Supplies 

Send for 

our New Catalogues. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO., 749 Craig St., MONTREAL 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



WHAT WE DO IN JANUARY. 



GET ready for it first during the week 
intervening between Christmas' 
ending and the first day of the new 
year ; get ready for inventory by measuring 
rolls of belting, oilcloth, screen wire, 
poultry netting, rubber hose, leaving a 
memorandum slip with each line ; count 
the loose bolts, lag screws, twist drills, hand 
taps, cap and set screws, finished and semi- 
finished nuts ; count, weigh and mark and 
clean up everything that will permit of it 
and is not of a class constantly depleted by 
sales each day. 

INVENTORY. 

In this way it is wonderful how greatly 
the time of inventory is shortened. By the 
way, the inventory is never finished until 
every set of men in each department have 
submitted with their sheets a memorandum 
of all shortages for the want book (it is the 
ideal time of the year to find correctly your 
wants). White newspaper stock, cut to 
size, is splendid for purposes of stock- 
taking, using two men together, one to call 
off and one to set down ; then all to be 
handed in for copying in books Nos. i, 2 and 
3, as the case may be — leaving it in good 
shape for reference as an insurance record, 
and for the year's buying of new stocks as 
a guide. While copying, figuring and 
carrying out is being done in the office, all 
f loose stocks and short goods, such as bolts, 
screws, nuts, washers, rivets, etc., can be 
filled up and rearranged for the year's 
beginning. 

As the next best thing after finishing 
stocktaking would suggest getting at 

NEGLECTED AND OVERDUE ACCOUNTS. 

They are the bane of every merchant's 
existence, and at this time, as at no other 
of the year, very many of them can be col- 
lected. Many customers will settle then 
from whom it is hard to collect later in the 
year. The temptation is so great to depend 
for one's financing on those accounts that 
are easy to get and always certain to come 
in or to be had for the asking, while the 
slow ones are let run or neglected. It is 
surrpising what a little hard work will do at 
this time of year with a capable man back 
of the collections. Very many customers 
will not pay until asked to do so, and on 
the other hand only await the asking. 

Many of us have a large country client- 
age — hard to get at and particularly hard 
when the account exists — yet a cleverly- 
worded letter stating your case and asking 
for funds in a way that will not antagonize 
will bring the majority of them on first trial. 
Threatening letters are no good — they are 
utterly without value. The old saying that 
you can coax where you cannot drive is 



essentially applicable in making collections. 
After starting the right man or men at 
this vital part of the month's work, it is 
well to put the best man in the house for 
the purpose at preparing the sale of 

DEAD STOCK OR UNSALABLE GOODS 

Many of us insist that we do not have it 
— or but little of it. All of us have more or 
less, and nothing is lost just now by going 
over and bringing it out, giving it a 
table or counter of its own, marking any 
price on it that will sell it, and instructing 
every man in the house to make a special 
effort to see it disposed of. It occurs in 
different finishes of builders' hardware, 
locks, knobs, butts, etc., in old and old- 
style sash locks, sash lifts, escutcheons, 
cabinet trim, household goods, such as old- 
time coffee mills, clothes wringers, and 
various items scattered through the store, 
and easily found if hunted for. 

Large sale cards in plain figures, at half 
their original value, with a little general 
effort, will sell every dollar's woith, and 
you are rid of it for all time. 

LINES THAT HAVE NOT PAID 

show up with every January invoice, and it 
becomes a good time to find out why — to 
either strengthen or change them, or drop 
them altogether. Perhaps the latter is the 
safest policy where good, strong efforts 
have been put forth on the goods without 
paying results. The same money put into 
another and better line may bring good 
profits. 

It is a good time, too, to make a stronger 
effort, so that every month and each week 
of the coming year may be filled with goods 
that sell and that make the entire year a 
busy one — without the two old-time dull 
seasons supposed to belong to the hard- 
ware merchant. It is possible to add sea- 
son goods, novelties and strong lines that 
will do this. More and more of it is being 
done by the merchants each year and the 
change in the business becomes a most 
agreeable one to all. 

ECONOMIES FOR THE YEAR 

may be better placed in January than any 
other month ; not the economies that come 
from cutting salaries of worthy employes — 
that is a false one — but the cutting off and 
shutting down on the little everyday leaks 
and expenses. The light and heat bills are 
nearly always excessive and can generally 
be improved on. The last few years have 
shown wonderful changes in methods of 
heating and lighting. Perhaps your dray- 
age and delivery account (always a large 
one) can be lessened for the year — even 
with a growing business. 



You may for the time being — for good 
reasons — have given up discounting your 
invoices. Make some arrangement to keep 
it up. No one thing creates as much revenue, 
no one thing is so abused and so greatly 
misunderstood. It is not only the fact that 
in an average store it will pay a good clerk's 
or bookkeeper's salary for the year, but it 
is a money investment not made or allowed * 
in any bank. As stated in The Iron Age a 
number of times, 2 per cent, at 6o days 
equals an investment of nearly 16 per cent., 
and 2 per cent, at 30 days an investment of 
nearly 36 per cent. Everyone does not 
get the time to carefully go over and check 
invoices — it means dollars a great many 
times. There are other and many economies 
to be found. 

THE MONTH OF SPRING CONTRACTS 

is at hand in January. Your steel goods 
are to come in. It's a good time to make 
a new rack for them. Your bulk seed stock 
will need attention now, and no other one 
line pays so well if bought right 
and put in proper shape for sale. The 
paint stock is to be gone over and 
gotten ready, and new colors select- 
ed for the early spring months. Quo- 
tations are to be sought on and contracts 
made for lawn mowers, also ice cream 
freezers and refrigerators. A new and better 
line of hammocks are to be carried. Then 
there are lawn swings and lawn seats, 
screen doors and screen windows, poultry 
netting and screen wire, water coolers and 
filters — all to obtain quotations on and con- 
tract for. A very vital thing is to see that 
contracts or season goods get in early — very 
early — they nearly all have a spring dating, 
and in many cases you have largely sold 
and are reordering by the time^our com- 
petitors' first shipment is in. 

CULTIVATING THE TRADE, 

old and new, should begin in January. 
Forms for attractive and well-worded per- 
sonal letters should be gotten ready, the 
advertising of previous years improved 
upon, the reaching of trade that has never 
been in your house sought for. The manu- 
facturers from whom you buy goods will aid 
you largely in your " spring cultivation " of 
trade with fresh cuts, new printed matter, 
catalogues, folders, vest pocket memoranda, 
metallic fence signs, food chopper and 
chafing receipts and books, tool catalogues, 
etc., which can be had for the asking. 

January becomes the pivotal month of 
the year, and should have much attention. 
On it largely depends the results of the 1 1 
months that follow — and the year's busi- 
ness. Instead of a month of dullness and 
rest, it should be a primal one — one full of 
good schemes for the year. Individual 
personal work will bring the year of 1901 
up to what it should be. — " A Western 
Merchant," in Iron Age. 



' 



CANADIAN HAKDWAR 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGL AN! 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




a.ns&c 
UNION JACK 

CUTLERY 

We make a specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office : 
6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 

COOPER'S 

ONE-PIECE ELBOWS. 

Scheipe's Patent Stove Pipe 

Best In the world. 




A sk for 

COOPER'S 

PATENT ELBOW 

Price Guaranty d. 



E. T. WRIGHT <Sc CO. 

Sole Owners. HAMILTON, ONT. 

" JARDINE " 
HAND DRILLS 

Five different sizes to suit 
all requirements. It pays 
to sell the best tools. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 




ARE AND METAL /^^T^ 



M 



31 




♦♦♦♦•»♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦ 

ValYes and Plungers. 

Only the very best leather and rubber are used 
4fe in these goods, and all are carefully and evenly 

fitted, making them the best of their kind. J 

Berger Bros. I 
Co. I 

PHILADELPHIA, U.S.A. t 



This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very bandy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co. 5Sik5^si^92i 




The Latest and Best 



H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 



Model 
1900. 




Harrington & Richardson Aims Co. 

Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Dpsciiptive Catalogue on request. 



STEVENS ...FINE TOOLS 



Stevens; | bench 

Surface 
Gauge 




We make a perfect line 



CALIPERS and DIVIDERS 

Also such tools as Surface Gauges, Tool 
Makers' Clamps, Center Punches, etc. 

Write for our New Catalogue containing a description of our Tools. 
It is also a valuable hand-book of information for mechanics and people 
interested in such lines. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 

P.O. Box 216, Chicopee Falls, Mass, U.S.A. 



Carried by our representatives at Toronto and Montreal. 



HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Hand Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, white and colored. Tennis and Fly Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twines. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE TWENTIETH CENTURY MAN. 

BY T. JAMES FERNLEY, SECY. TREAS. NATIONAL HARDWARE ASSOCIATION. 



THE century is dead ! Volumes by 
the thousand could be written in 
addition to the many thousands of 
volumes which have already been produced 
narrating the history of the past ioo years. 

You have undoubtedly written to many 
gentlemen for an expression of views of the 
century which has passed, and you doubt- 
less have many excellent articles which will 
be read by the favored subscribers of your 
organ. I leave it to others to write of the 
great events of the past century, and simply 
avail myself of the opportunity to say a few 
words to those who will be responsible for 
the making of the history of the twentieth 
century. 

In our city, at the present time, we find 
many signs on the doors of leading institu- 
tions of industry, " Boy Wanted !" " Man 
Wanted !" We think we see hanging on 
the great door-knob of the twentieth cen- 
tury an immense placard bearing the words: 
" Man Wanted !" 

We know the kind of men that have been 
wanted during the past century, but we are 
not quite sure that the same type of man is 
the one "wanted" for the twentieth cen- 
tury. Things are beginning to move very 
rapidly ; stage coach and Conestoga wagon 
days are over ; steam is giving out, electri- 
city and compressed air seem to be the 
forces that will be used in the early days of 
the twentieth century. The man who is 
"wanted" may not be a wonderful genius. 
He certainly should not be a theorist, but 
must in every way be practical. It will not 
be so much a question of ability as of 
availability. By this we mean, the power 
to avail one's self of every opportunity to 
exert the talents which are inborn to the 
greatest extent and at the right time. 

COMMON SENSE. 

He must be a man endowed to the fullest 
extent with what is known as common 
sense. This quality with an education will 
be preferable, but if a man is not endowed 
with common sense, an education, in our 
opinion, will give emphasis to this lack to 
the detriment of the individual involved. 
We once heard of a lawyer who was cross- 
examining a witness. The lawyer had the 
reputation of not being particularly bright, 
although very well educated. A farmer who 
was noted for his common sense was under 
cross-examination by this lawyer, and, 
objecting to the way a certain question was 
put, the lawyer said to him : " Do you 
presume to object to my proposition ? You, 
an ignorant farmer, while I graduated at 
two universities ! " 

The farmer replied: "That's nothing. 



I had a calf once that sucked from two 
cows, and the more it sucked, the greater 
calf he became. ' ' 

QUICK DECISIONS NECESSARY. 

Now, I would not have you understand 
that an education is not going to be neces- 
sary for the twentieth century man, but I 
feel that the man who is wanted is one who 
has common sense, one who knows what to 
do and when to do it. The man wanted in 
the twentieth century will be the one who is 
able to come to quick decisions. We know 
of many men who are willing, and who 
have ability, and would be available men 
were it not for the fact that they move too 
slowly. They do not come to quick 
decisions. It is dangerous for them to ride 
on a train that is run by compressed air 
— one of those trains that rushes up to the 
station, where the conductor has his hand 
on the rope connected with the air valve, 
even before the train comes to a stop, who 
calls out "All aboard ! " and quickly shuts 
the gate until it reaches the next station. 
The twentieth century man, the man who 
is wanted, must be ready to step aboard as 
quickly as the train pulls up to the platform, 
and, if possible, before it comes to a stop. 

ENTHUSIASM 

The man wanted must be a man brim full 
of enthusiasm, not too dignified, only digni- 
fied to the extent of commanding proper 
respect, but not of that same dignified 
condition that he will be in after life leaves 
his body. We have seen many men in the 
latter days of the nineteenth century who 
have ability and would have been available 
men were it not for the fact that they are as 
cold as a corpse and as dignified. 

The man who answers the call of the 
twentieth century — " Man Wanted ! " — 
must be one full of enthusiasm ; whatever 
he does must be done under high pressure ; 
the gauge of the reservoir wherein the 
power is held must ever show a supply 
equal to any emergency. The twentieth 
century man must throw himself almost 
bodily into the work in which he is engaged - 

MULES AS AMMUNITION. 

We some time ago heard of an instance 
that happened before the Pacific railroads 
were built. A company of soldiers was 
crossing the mountains. Mule power was 
being used; a mountain howitzer was lashed 
to the mule's back. The company was 
attacked by Indians ambushed behind huge 
rocks. The attack was so sudden that the 
soldiers had not time to unlimber the guns 
and get into position. The captain was a 
young man full of enthusiasm. He whirled 



the mule around and fired the cannon from 
the mule's back. So great was the recoil 
of the cannon that it hurled cannon 
and mule end over end down the hill 
towards the rocks where the Indians were 
ambushed. They fled like sheep when 
they saw the strange shot coming. 

The next day the chief was captured and 
brought into camp. The young captain 
asked him why he fled so yesterday when 
they had lost their gun and the whole party 
might have been scalped. The old chief 
straightened himself up and said : "Look 
at me ! Me big Injun. Me no 'fraid little 
guns. Me no 'fraid big guns, but when 
white man fires whole mule at Injun me 
very much 'fraid." 

The twentieth century man must be ever 
ready for emergencies such as confronted 
this little band of soldiers, and his very 
enthusiasm will lead him to victory. 

BROADNESS. 

Another quality which the man answering 
the call of the twentieth century must 
possess is that of broadness. This is a 
term which was very much used in the last 
days of the nineteenth century. Indeed, the 
writer has heard it used by some men who 
are extremely narrow. The broad-gauged 
man is one who constantly has before him 
the fact that "There are others." He 
must concede that the difference between 
the weight of his brain matter and that of 
his fellow is not very considerable and that 
by exchanging ideas with his fellowmen he 
can be made more efficient and more avail- 
able for the development of work which the 
twentieth century demands. 

COOPERATION THE KEYNOTE OF THE 
TWENTIETH CENTURY. 

During the past six years I have had rare 
opportunity to study the characteristics of 
many men who were engaged in making 
the commercial history of that era, and I 
say, without any fear of successful contra- 
diction, that the most successful of these 
were those who would rank as broad-gauged 
men. Cooperation will be the keynote of 
the twentieth century, therefore the man 
who is "wanted" is the one who will be 
willing to cooperate with his fellowmen in 
developing the best thought and plan of 
action. 

It will not be the privilege of the present 
readers of this journal to review the history 
of the twentieth century, but we venture 
that those whose privilege it will be to read 
The American Artisan in the year 2001 will 
find that the men who will leave their im- 
print on the pages of history of the twen- 
tieth century will be those who have the 
qualities to which we have alluded. — 
American Artisan. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



ii 



JJ 



' 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents : 



Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




We Manufacture""^ 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CURRENT |V[ARKET QUOTATIONS 



January 18 1901. 
These prhes are for such qualiti s and 

iiuaatitiej as are usually order d by retail 

dealers on the usual te ms of c edit, the 
1 .west figure j being for larger quantities und 

prompt p»y. Large cash tuyera can fre- 
quently make purchase* a better prices The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the doBiie 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 32 33 

Tlnplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M . L. 8. , equal to Bradley. Per box 

I.O., usual sizes $7 00 

IX., " 8 50 

„ I.X.X., " 10 00 

Famous — 

JO. 7 50 

JX 8 50 

I.X.X 9 50 

Karen & Vulture Grades— 

I.O., usual sizes 5 00 

IX., " 6 00 

I.X.X " 7 00 

l.XXX., " 8 00 

D.V., 12%xl7 4 75 

D.X 5 50 

D.X.X 7 50 

Ooke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.G., usual sizes 4 15 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 5u 

20 x 28 8 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. Q. Grade— 

I.O., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 75 

I.X., Terne Tin 10 75 

Charooal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
XX., 14x56, 50sheet bis ) 

" 14x60 " }■ 07 07% 
•' 14x65, " ) 
Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08", 

" 26 " 08% 09 

' 28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 165 170 

Refined " " 2 15 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 05 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 10 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base 2 00 

rire Steel.... 2 00 

Machinery iron finish 2 05 

Oast Steel, per lb 00 00 

ToeCalkSteel 2 30 

T. Firth & Cos special cast steel, per lb. 13 

Jesiop s Tool Steel 13 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-inoh 21'/, 

2 " 13% 

S<4 " 016 

3 " 17% 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

'4 ioch 2 25 

3-16 inch 2 25 

H inoh and thioker 2 25 

Black Sheets. 

18 gauge 3 10 

20 gauge 3 10 

22to24 " 3 20 

2« " 3 30 

28 " 3 40 

Canada Plates. 

AH dull, 52 sheets 3 15 

Half polished 3 25 

All bright 3 85 4 00 



Iron Pipe. 

Black pipe — 

% inoh 3 00 

% ' 3 00 

% " 3C5 

% " 3 20 

1 " 4 SO 

1% " 6 35 

1% " 7 55 

2 '" 10 10 

2%-6 inch, discount 60 p c. 

Galvanized pipe— 

V. ioch 4 65 

% " 5 35 

> ;; 7?5 

1% " 9 75 

1% " 11 25 

2 " 15 50 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G O. Comet. Amer. Head. 

16 gauge 4.-5 4 00 

18 to 24 gauge 4 25 3 85 4 35 4 25 

26 " 4 50 4 10 4 35 4 50 

28 " 4 75 4 35 4 50 4 75 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

ProofCoil, 3-16 in., per 1001b 

% " 8 00 8 50 

5-16 " " 5 35 5 

% " " 4 35 4 85 

" 7-16 " " 4 15 4 65 

% " " 4 35 4 50 

" % " " 3 85 4 35 

" % " " 3 80 4 00 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 25 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis. 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 

Ingot 

English B. S., ton lots 19 20 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cut lengths round, % to % in. 23% 25 
' ' round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23% 25 
Sheet. 
Untinned, 14 oz. , and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 23 23 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea„ per lb 25% 

" 35to45 " " .... 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " .... 23% 
Boiler and T. K. Pitts 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, perllb 32 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 06 06% 

Domes tio " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5 owt. casks 6 75 7 00 

Partcasks 7 00 7 50 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 0434 05 

Bar.llb 05% 05% 

Sheets, 2% lbs. tq. ft., by 06'/ 4 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Notb.— Cut sheets % oent per lb. extra 



Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7o. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1U0 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% p.c. Prioes are f o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized 
on Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discoun t, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 

Bar half-and-half, guarant'd 19 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l 18% 

Refined 18% 

Wiping 18 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 

quantity. The prices of other qualities of 

solder in the market indicated by private 

brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Per 100 lb 

Pure 6 87% 

No. 1 do 6 50 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5 75 

No.4do 5 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 7 12% 

Brandram'sB B. Genuine 8 00 

" Decorative 7 55 

" No. 1 6 85 

" " No. 2 6 00 

- Red Lead. 

Gspiuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 09 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 06% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities,per gallon 110 

Barn (in bblB.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams PaintB 1 45 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Co's Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 
Colors in Oil . 
25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 09 

Oolors,I>ry. 
Yellow Ochre (J.O.) bbls.... 135 140 
Yellow Ochre (J.F.L.S.), bbli .... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), per owt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per owt 3 00 3 25 

Amerioan Oxides, per owt.. 1 75 2 00 
Canadian Oxides, per cwt.,.. 175 2 00 
Super Magnetio Oxides, 93p.c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " o 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Blaok, pure 09 



Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Ocbre 03% 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb .... 100 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, per lb .... 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Blue Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Pntty. 

Bulk in bbls 2 00 

Bulk in less quantity 2 15 

Bladders in bbls 2 20 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 2 35 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 45 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 75 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 1001b3 00 
Varnishes. 

In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

" body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No.l 160 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 30 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan, 1 60 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 80 

'' No. 1 1 60 2 00 



The Imperial 
Varnish & Color 
Co's., Limited 
Elastilite Varnish 
1 gal. can, each. 
$2.00. 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2.00. 

Maple Leaf 
Coach Enamels ; 
Size 1, 60c. ; 
Size 2, 35c. ; Size 
3, 20c. each 




Unseed Oil. 

Raw. Boiled. 

1 to'4 bbls delivered $0 82 $0 85 

5 to 9 bbls " 81 84 

Toronto, Hamilton, London and Guelph 
2c. less. 

Turpentine . 

Single barrel, freight allowed 59 

2 to 4 barrels " " .... 58 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb. . 10 10% 

" " small lots 10% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

Cod Oil per gal 50 55 

Pure Olive 120 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glne. 

Common 08% 09 

French Medal 14 14-/, 

Cabinet sheet 8 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers IS 20 

Huttner 18 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE ANu METAL 



4 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

^ Limited 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., MONTREAL 



SOLE AGENTS 

IN CANADA. 




HARDWARE. 

Ammunition . 

Cartridges. 
B. B. Gaps. Dom. 50 and S per cent. 
Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. o., Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., SO and 5 p. o. 
Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p.o. Amer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 
Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
"Dominion" grades, 25 per cent Rival 
and Nitro, net i ist. 
Brass shot Shells, 55 per cent 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-,b. bags SO 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5X1 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5 ,0 each, 8 gauge 5.5 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

eaoh, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 

each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and U gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Per lb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined 4 50 

Wilkinson ftCo.'s Anvils.. lb. 09 09/ a 
Wilkinson & Co.'s Vices.. lb. 0(9% 10 

Angers. 
Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, per doz 6 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordiuary, per gro36 5 75 6 00 

Best, quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zino 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 
Baths. 
Standard Knameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim 1st quality 30 00 

" " 2nd " 22 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11'/, 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb 25 

SYRACUSE 8MK0TINO WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo 29 

Special 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse".. 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55per cent. 



Cow. 
Amerioan make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

- " Peterboro'. discount 45 per oent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. ' 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47%. to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per pross.... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, full square, Norway 70 

" " full square 7J 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 65 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 65 

Coach Screws 75 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 75 

Blank Bolts 65 

Bolt Ends 65 

Nuts, square 4%c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. A 

Plough Bolts 60 * 

Boot Calks . 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " .... 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Batchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred rooting, per 100 lb 1 65 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 iO 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 6 J per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per o nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 100 150 

Bui lard 's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, p jr gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 3 80 3 00 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulio 125 150 



Chalk. 

Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon , per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnocb's, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns . 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8- 
No. 1, $8.50— ">o. 2. $9.00— No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 68 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet *8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fittings 1 25T 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout 4 7,'iy 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout 5 25 

Fittings 1 55 

Low Down Teutonic, plain 14 50 

" " " embossed 15 00 

Plain Richelieu 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu 4 00 

Fittings 1 25 

L"w Dow a Oat. Syphon Jft, plain. . 20 009 

" " emb'd. 20 50 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round. 14 in 60 

oval, 17x14 in 1 51 

" 19xl5in 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles. Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33' ' 3 per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

" 6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. ) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 

Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 percent. 
Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, dis.. 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets 
Common, cork-lined, dis 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No.l.perdoz J 45 

No. 2, per doz 1 20 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney 4 Foote, 60 and 10 p.c. to 60, 10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co. , 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per oent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc, dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft . 

Inohes. 

Uoder26 2 10 4 00 6 00 

26to40...... 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

41 to 50 4 75 .... 7 25 

51 to 60 5 . .... 8 50 

61 to 70 5»3? .... 9 25 

71 to 80 5 7 5 .... 10 50 



81 to 85 

86 to 90 

91 to 95. 

99 to 100 



6 50 



11 75 

14 00 

15 50 
18 tO 



GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 5o to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each... 1 65 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web,-perdoz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb 07% 08H 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb.... 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 1 50 2 00 

Store door, per doz 100 150 

Fork. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list 
Saw. 

American, per doz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 7o 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 4U per cent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pain. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11. 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%,10-ft. run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in„ per lb. . . . 06% 
" " 5-in., " .... 06'A 

" " 6-in., " ... t6 

8-in., " .... 05% 
" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pai s 

Spring 12 OO 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc. , dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount 45 and 5 per oent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 100 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, disoount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 
HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand 50 p. 
"M" brand 50 p. 

Aoadian, 50 and 10 per cent. 



).c. dis. I 



Oval head. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



u 



Syracu 



Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



Factories • J & 2 William St -. MONTREAL, QUE. 
faoiones . j and SY RACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



<\ 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller 
Light, medium, and heavy. . . 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 BO 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B Toronto. Hamilton, London and 
Onelnh, 10c per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Starperdoz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per In 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Look, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door japanned and N.P., per 

doz 150 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. * L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 1 ' ner cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz. . , 7 50 

No. 3 " Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 0. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russell & Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 

English and Am., per doz 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flathead discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p. o. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 8 50 1 00 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wir« 

2d and 3d $3 35 $3 85 

3d---- 3 CO .152 

< a °d5d 2 75 3 35 

6and7d 2 65 3 20 

8and9d 2 50 3 00 

JOandlM 2 45 2 95 

16and20d 2 40 2 91 

30. 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 35 2 85 

Galvanmng 2c. per lb. netextra. 
Steel (Jut NailB lOo. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per oent 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barral nails, dis 25 per cent 



NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 50 per cent, for McMullen's. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

C. S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (US ) 16V 2 

Prime White (U.S ) 0)5% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can ) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per oent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 

PICKS. 
Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 1 75 3 00 

Brass head '* .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
o 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Imnression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's wirk, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 
Jenkins disk g'obe and angle valves, dis- 
count. 55 percent. 
Standard volves. discount, E0 per per rent. 
JenkinB radiator valves discount 55 per cent. 
' " " standard, dis., 60 p.c 

Quick opening values discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7. Fuller's 2 SO 

No 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1001b. or less o 85 

1.G0Q lb. or more 80 

Net 31 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 25 pe oent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 1 00 

Axle 22 33 

Screw o 27 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, ner inch n 00 100 

RANOE BOILERS. 

Oalvanized, 30 gallons , 6 50 

35 " 750 

«0 " 8 50 



Copper, 30 " 22 00 

fi 35 " 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable Canadian list 

50 and 10 p.c. revised list. 
Wood, 25 per oent. 

RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 

New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.".. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.o. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler* Co.'s 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount, 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS, 
iron Rivets, discount 60 end 1" per cent. 
x run Burrs, liscount £5 rer cent. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 60 p.c. 
Extras on Iron RivetB in 1-lb. cartons, Vic 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets & Burrs. 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

„■ ., , Sisal. Manila. 

7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 9 13 

%ia 10 14 

'4 and 5-16 in 15 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16% 

" 5-32ioch 21% 

" %inch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 151/, 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9^ 

New Zealand Rope 10% 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set- 
Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 70 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 75 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% per cent. 
B * A. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. * D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft. . . , 35 55 
S. & D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

' frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 CO 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 
"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALES. 
B. S. * M. Scales, 45 p.o. 
Champion. 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard. 35 p.c. 

" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 



SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., iron, and steel, 85 p. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 8' p.o. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 77% p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 70 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 7u p.o. 
" R.H. " 65 p.o. 

Drive Screws, 80 per cent. 

Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co , full nickeled, dis. 69 p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Cauadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' ." 450 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1 ,l%lb.,perlb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev list 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.o. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, dis., 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Ketinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 00 

rlain 000 345 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 
STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

w i,- t STONE. Per lb, 

•".■"J" 1 ? 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

T , . 8li P. 09 09 

Labrador n j| 

Axe niE 

T^key ] ;;; „ & 

w.r^ Sa f a 00 ° 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates of 25 lengths. 
5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths . . 7 00 

7 mch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

2°' »~? 4 ozen in caae - net 01 »8h .... *4 80 
Mo. b— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

8trawberry box tacks, bulk ... 75 fc'iof ° 

Cheese-box tacks, blued .*80 & 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 5 

" " tinned .'.'.'80*10 

(in kegs) 40 

Cutbacks, blued, in dozens only ..75 & 15 

V 4 weights 60 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80*10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk .'.'.'.'.'.' 85 & 12% 
brush, blued & tinned, bulk.. 7T> 
gimp, blued, tinned and 

zinc tacks j . api . nned ::::::..::::::3 7 | 4121/2 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"SkSfeSfl 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB. „ A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Montreal ' "Canadian Representatives- Montreal 



OF ALL KINDS. 



For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Trunk nails, black Bo ana 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued and tinned. . . .65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

• bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz.... 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Ohesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson's per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. &N,, P. S. * W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.c. 



TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. . 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb.. 27 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb. . . . 22 26 
Wrapping, mottled, per pack. 50 60 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 20 

4-ply 26 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES. 

Hand, per doz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 12 13 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, $2.80 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nos. 2 to 5, ad- 



vance 7o. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9, base- 
No. 10, advance 7c— No.ll, 14c— No. 12. 
20c-No. 13, 35c— No. 14, 47c— No. 15, 
60c— No. 16, 75c Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 17% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No. 18, $5.50-No. 19, $6 -No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30-No. 23, 
$7.65-No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
$9.50— No. 27, $10-No. 28. $11— No 29, 
$12- No. 30, $13-No. 31,$14-No. 32, $15 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31, 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil- 
ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles,15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c. — bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Galvanized Wire, per 1001b— Nos. 6, 7, 8,$3.55 
No. 9, $3.10-No. 10, 33.75-No. 11, $3.85 
No. 12, $3.25-No. 13, $3.35-No. 14, 
$4.25-No. 15, $4.75-No. 16. $5.00. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 

per 1,000 feet 3 30 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B. 
Galvanized 4 barb, 2% and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 10 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.97y 2 

in less than carlots, and $2.85 in carlots. 

Terms, 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 
Ross braid truss cable 4 50 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . 1 35 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c. off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37V4 per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. * K's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $60 00 

Royal Canadian " 58 00 

Royal American " 50 00 

Discount, 45 per cent. : terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHER8. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 and 5 per cen 



THE AUER 
GASOLINE LAMP 



The Light of Eight Oil Lamps 
for the Cost of Two. 

Safe, 
Strong, Satisfactory. 

Covered by the broadest 
possible Guarantee. The 
construction, finish and 
appearance are unequalled, 
but it Is your satisfaction which we guarantee. If 
you don't like the lamp for any reason you can get 
your money back. No other lamp In Canada is so 
broadly guaranteed, for no other Is as good. 




CORDAGE 
TWINE 



Write for Catalogue. 



AUER LIGHT CO. 



1682 Notre Dame St., 



E. Simpson & Co., 

Moose Jaw, Agents for the Territories. — MONTREAL. 



and 



OF ALL KINDS 

Manufactured from Manila, 
Sisal, Russian, New Zealand, 
Jute, Italian and Flax. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

Western Ontario Representative : 

WM. B. STEWART, 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



SENE for specimen copy of Phillips' Monthl Machinery 
Register, containing over 5,000 entries of new and 
second-hand machinery of every description. The oldest 
established and most successful medium in the world. 
Established 25 years for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to thone who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per annum, all over the 
world, and is used for continual reference by a large number 
of firms. It is consequently a most valuable advertising 
medium for all engineers and manufacturers. Subscription , 
6a per annum, price per copy, 6d. Sole Proprietor, Chas. 
D. Phillips, M.IM.E.. Newport, Mon., England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mon.' 



IN BUYING- 



LINSEED OIL 

it is always well to get the purest and 
best — something you can recommend and 
guarantee to your customers. 

Stewart Bros. & Spencer's 

is the best. Name on every barrel. 
Special quotations for import. 



J. WATTERSON & CO. 

MONTREAL, Agents for Canada. 



Lockerby <& McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 



Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S.--Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc.' You can get commercial- 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PREsTcUPPiNG BUREAU, 

505 Board of Trade Bldg., MONTREAL, QUE. 

Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 TEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 




Tailors' Shears, 

Trimmers, Scissors, 

Tinners' Snips, etc. ACKH0WLEDGED THE BEST . 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SiwA^ RK N .?. FF ^sV° chamber ' 8t 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

CHAS. F. CLARK, President. JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849— 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN. N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen. ManVWestern Canada, Toronto. JOHN A, FULTON, Gen, Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



Awarded a Gold Medal at 
PARIS EXPOSITION for 

superiority. That's proof 
enough of their quality, and 
clearly shows that they are 
the best. 



The Bailey 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 




Dominion Pattern 

Cow Tie /Stall Fixture 

The special features of the tie and stall fixture are well 
shown in the illustration. As will be noticed the chain is 
very short, which prevents all danger of entanglement with 
the animal's foot. At the same time the form of the fixture 
is such that great freedom is allowed to the head. Because 
of the short chain this tie is much cheaper than the ordin- 
ary patterns. 

The stall fixture is made from a tough quality of steel 
and is very strong. Also, owing to its circular cross-section, 
it is exceedingly rigid. Its simplicity, convenience, cheap- 
ness, and ease of attaching make it very popular with cow 
tie users. 

This form of tie and stall fixture are sometimes called 
Niagara pattern. 

American or Flat Link Chain, 

for years the standard cow tie chain in "the States," 
is now rapidly coming in favor in Canada. Its 
short link, handsome appearance and smooth sur- 
face — which cannot injure the animal's neck — make 
it superior to all other styles of chain for cow ties. 

For sale by all Jobbers ; manufactured by 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited. 



NIAGARA FALLS, 
ONT. 




Inc. IMC 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 



i! 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve ^^^ 



Medals 




Awarded 

By JURORS * 

International Expositions 

Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




■ >%^* ^ %f%/+W%*sv%^%s%*&%sv%^%^'%n 



oo< GARDEN HOSE. «. 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, * 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO. LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 
49-61-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO, C anada. 



Factories -I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Tin Plate 
Company, 

Battery Park Building, New York City. 

Manufacturers .^^m^^- 

TIN PLATE 
TERNE PLATE 



and 



BLACK PLATE. 



B.S S.H.THOMPSON* COY 

26 St. Suipice St., MONTREAL, 

Sole Agents for Dominion of Canada. 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar- brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 

<VWWWWWW«'WWVW«/V%'V 

GALVANIZED ClMIGATED SHEETS 
"BLACKW" BRA1 




■wx/wwwwwww%<v» ^ww 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Get the Best. 

Extra 1, 2, and 3. 
LANGWELL'S BABBIT, Montreal. 



qM 



■%? 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIII 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 26, 1901. 



NO. 4 



TANDEM" IITI-FRICTIDI METAL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



"Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other lor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH * McNAUGHTON. 59 St. Sulpico Street, MONTREAL 

THE TANDEH SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




We used to say 

As Flat as a Pancake 

Now the Standard is 

As Flat as " Queen's Head" Iron. 

The extra flatness means a better Job 
and labor saved. 

" Fleur de Lis " ^and is as rut as " Queen's Head." 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, 
MONTREAL. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, u-.teo. 



&43L 






nfidence means success — past, present, 
cess. The Safford Radiators were never 
yet founa wanting in a single, vital part. They solve the 
i^pwlem of Steam or Hot- Water Heating, because — hav- 
/ing nojpmts they cannot leak, standing a pressure of 140 
ltfeytolne square inch they cannot break, having no ob- 
structions in the pipes the heat circulates freely in one 
minute after the heat is turned on. 

The Safford Radiators 

are light, 
yet strong — handsome as a Radiator can be. They fit 
circles, curves, angles. There are twenty-five different 
styles. They are the Radiators of Confidence— the original 
invention in screw threaded nipple connections. Send for 
our free, illustrated Booklet — it will give you "Confidence" 
in the largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British flag. 



The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, 

TORONTO,' ONT. 



EL» OF ALL KINDS 

We are handling a complete line of Wood's famous ice 
tools and will be pleased to give you estimates on supplies 
for 1 90 1. 



SAW5 

_ _ PLOWS 

WRITE g I M MARKERS 

FOR ■ m. MM * CHISELS 

PRICES. TONQS, Etc. 



ICE 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



-Limited. 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets, TnpniMTo 

Iff mTHTHlrrHrmWTTflmTflTO 
THE - 1 

Abbott-Mitchell 
Iron and Steel Company 

OF ONTARIO, LIMITED. 

Manufacturers of . . . 



£ 



Bar Iron and Steel 
Nails, Spikes 
Horse Shoes . . 
Bolts, Washers, etc. • 



Belleville, 
Ontario. 






<*~^a: 




.A^B^METAL 



cBelting 



Canadian Rubber^ 

MONTREAL -:•> TORONTO 
W/NNIPEG 



&mes Cartland k Son 



Manufaclurers of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.G. 



SOME OF THE NEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




No. 15 "Yankee " Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT AND LEFT HAND, AND RIGID, WITH FINGER TURN ON BLADE 2, 3, 4 and 5-in. BLADES. 




. No. 20 " Yankee " Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT HAND ONLY, AND RIGID. 3 SIZES, EXTREME LENGTH OPEN, INCLUDING BIT— 14, 17 and 19-inches 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWAJl-ETVlND «METAL 



*M] 



SAP SPOUTS 



^ 



ifc 




"EUREKA " 



Cuts Show 
Full Size 
Of Spouts. 

4* 




THE "EUREKA' 

Steel Sap Spouts 
Are Ever Popular 



Patented 1896. 

> \ i Economical and Durable 

Because \ Safe and Secure— No Leakage 
ar °/ \ Easily inserted, does not injure the tree 
\ Secure Full Flow of Sap 




"IMPERIAL 



ff The "IMPERIAL" is made of 
Heavy Tinned Steel, neatly 
retinned. Specially adapted 
for covered Sap Buckets. 



ALL PACKED IN CARDBOARD BOXES, 100 EACH. 

Berlin Bronze, made in 22 and 24 gauge. Tinned Steel, made in 20 gauge. 

PRICES ON APPLICATION. 

The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL. 



Brass 

Rods 

Sheets 
Tubes. 



Copper* 



Sheets 
Ingots. 



LARGE STOCKS. PRICES ON APPLICATION. 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington Street West, 



TORONTO, ONT, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



^ tjt rr ttt ^^ ry STARR MFG. CO'S 

^| J^^ /"x X "^ ^| standard lines of 

Acme and Hockey Skates 



rt 



also UNION HARDWARE CO'S Hockey. 



<M 



Toronto Office: 

32 Front St.,West 

H. T. Eager. 




Branch House: 

George D. Wood 
& Co., 

Winnipeg. 



LADIES' SKATE WITH LEATHER ANKLE SUPPORT. 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



"O 



Wood, Vallance & Co., - Hamilton 

Inspires Confidence 



ww^wvwwwwwvw 




does 



"PLYMOUTH" TWINE 



because its ... . 



Quality is Highest, 
Length is Longest, 
Strength is Greatest, 
Business is Largest. 



It is endorsed by all prudent dealers, and every economical farmer. 

It gives your full money's worth of economical, pure twine. 



Plymouth Binder Twine Agency, McKinnon Bldg., Helinda St., Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




THE SUCCESS of our 

PERIAL OXFOR 



NGE 

ever since we put it on the market, has been enormous. 

Its splendid construction and new patented features 
give it precedence over all others. 

THE FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

And other improvements, need only to be seen to 
be appreciated by your customers. 

If \ou haven't them in stock, better write for full 
information and price list. 

There's steady demand for them all over Canada. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 




THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL 




Stael Frame. 7^[ 

MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



David Maxwell & Sons 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 



u Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, 
and Detachable Driving Link Improved for sea- 
son of igoi. Steel or Wood Frame as desired. 



High and Low Wheels, 
from ii-in. to 20-in. 
widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shaftiog, Crucible Steel Knives and Cutting 

Plate. 



If your Wholesale House does not offer you 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different 
Sizes. 



these articles 



.SEND DIRECT TO US. 



"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



I THE NEW BALDWIN 

| DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 



BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation — 
Sanitary — Odorless. 
Latest Cleanahle Fea- 
tures—The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Locks 
Ball- Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Rubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 

Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 




Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the East 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; specia 
rtfrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



EXTENDED 
INSURANCE. 



One of the many liberal features embodied in the 
UNCONDITIONAL ACCUMULATIVE POLICY 

issued by the 

Confederation 
Life Association. 

HEAD OFFICE-TORONTO. 

is the provision for Extended Insurance. After three full annual premiums 
have beer, paid, the insured is entitled to Extended Insurance for the full 
amount of the policy for a term of years definitely stated therein. Paid-up 
and Cash Values also guaranteed. 

Rates and full information sent on application to the Head Office, To* 
ronto, or to any of the association's agents. 



W. C. Macdonald, 



J. K. MACDONALD, 



Actuary. 



Managing DirectOf 



BROWNIN G Automatic Repeating Pistol 







MODEL 1901 




SEVEN SHOT -?"' 

SAFE, RAPID, ACCURATE 



CATALOGUE AND PRICE ON APPLICATION. 



CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO., - Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND -METAL 



the WATSON, FOSTER CO., limited 

^ <& & MONTREAL 






MANUFACTURERS OF ALL GRADES OF 

^ WALL PAPER <& 



O.t-ar 







i^t^k' 



WORKS, ONTARIO STREET EAST. 
CAPACITY, 70,000 ROLLS PER DAY. 






PREPAID SAMPLES TO 
PROSPECTIVE BUYERS. 



ORDER WHILE THE 
LINE IS COMPLETE. 



GANA^AN 



-tOU. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Brok-r, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 






DUNDAS AXES 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
^ 




YanTuyl k Fairbank 

Petrolla, Ont. 

Headquarters for . . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps, Casing, Tubing, 

,. Drilling: Tools, 

etc. 



ARE- 



American in Sharpness, 
Canadian in Reliability, 

JUST WHAT YOU WANT TO SELL. 



Dundas Axe Works 

DUNDAS, ONT. 

IN 

BUSINESS 
FOR 
MONEY? 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



"DAISY" CHURN ^ 

Has tempered steel cased bicycle ball bearings, strongest, neat- 
est and most convenient frame. Only two bolts to adjust in 
setting up. Steel Bow Levers, suitable for either a standing or 
sitting posture. Has four wheels and adjustable feet to hold 
stand steady white churning When churn is locked to stand 
the bow can be used as handles to move it about on the front 
heels as handy as a baby carriage. Open on both sidts to 
""tre, giving free space for pail. Made with wood or steel 
with Cranks only, or Bow Levers as desired. 

I mar Perfect Washer 

Has a most enviable record. A 
perfe*j«B of its kind— will wash 
more cjotlbes in less time, do it better 
and easTei^tuj^h less wear and tear, 
than anyfc^etXiachine. 
THE. 



Vortmtn 4 Ward Mfg, Co,, 




Limited 
LONDON, ONT. 

Eastern Branch, 60 McGill Street, Montreal, Que 



BROWN'S PATENT STEEL 

PATENT NO. 32840. 



WIRE CHAIN 



Mm* 



1 Cry< Ullin Sllilll) Will FiUk. 






TttE MITCALO COMPANY. 





If you are Interested in chains examine carefully the perfect mechanical construction of the Brown's. It is the most 
perfect chainWUd eA We make it in 15 sizes. We use it exclusively in all our Halter, Dog, Tie-out, Cattle, Trace 
Chains, etc. YoWVU make no mistake in handling our line exclusively. 

THE B. <3LF=REENING WIRE CO., LIMITED 

Hamilton and Montreal. 



f 



WHY DON'T VOU GET 



A1URALO 

THE GREATEST OF ALL 

WALL TINTS 

It is a sure paying investment. The advertising 
methods bring you good business. It goes to 
every country in the world. 

AGENTS. 

A. RAMSAY & SON, MONTREAL. 

J. H. ASHDOWN, WINNIPEG. 

McLENNAN, McFEELY &, CO,, - - VANCOUVER 



Is not the sujbjeoj abo^t wh 
medium through jvhictf v*e intro 




HARDWARE 



we are talking now. 

PS 



The term here refers only to the 




to the trade for the season of 1901.* Up*fo-date dealers are' interested in handling goods that 
have both a record of value and proof of origin ^»^" 

ALABASTINE is patented in Canada an&other countries ;_is thoroughly advertised and 
time tested, and sells on its own merits. DealeRihandlingSALABASTINE run no risk what- 
ever on account of infringement on the rights oWbtn^nj, or thaVilfey will have stocks left on their 
hands that they cannot sell. . i Kg. -» 

Church's ALABASTINE is always in demand ; *«the only permanent and sanitary wall 
coating known to science. W""" 

If offered a substitute, or something "just as good," bear in mind that the party so offering may 
well be regarded with suspicion, and that a substitute always carries the earmarks of a swindle. 

ALABASTINE is sold by leading dealers throughout Canada. 



The attention of Contractors, Builders and Building Owners Is called to our 
PAMSTONE Wall Plaster and SHIELD BRAND Calcined Plaster. 

None Better. 



Address, THE ALABASTINE CO., LIMITED, Paris, Ont 



The trade supplied by— 

Sanderson Pearcy & Co.. Toronto, Ont. 
G. F. Stephens & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 



Vancouver Hardware Co , Vancouver, B.C. 
Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
William Hill, Montreal, P.Q. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND 




STEEL 



THE ATLAS 
ROLLER BEARING 



Three Sizes, Nos. 0, I, 2. 




THE PERFECT (covered) 
THE ROYAL (uncovered) 
Three Sizes, Nos. I, \ l A, 2. 




QUALITY, FINISH and PRICE CANNOT BE BEATEN. 

Manure, A R W qodYATT & CO., GUELPH, ONT. 

SOLD ONLY THROUGH THE WHOLESALE TRADE. 




Can Bottoms 



posseallll the poi/tTwhich go to make perfection in Can Bottoms. They have been 

a crVyjuFng public for two seasons, and their popularity is evidence of the 

lich they gave. The roll-rim has no sharp turns, which break the grain 

id lessen its wearing qualities. It has a broad wearing surface and will 

k>rs. They do not cost more than inferior bottoms. 

The fron (SrfcMTrimmings are made the same as the Broad Hoop, and differ from./ 
them only in having a narrower and thicker hoop, which does not require the roll-rim, 
and, therefore, can be sold cheaper. 



Manufactured by 



— For durability and finish, our Trimmings are unequalled. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., l0 Z™ 



Canada. 




! k VOL. XIII. MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY 26, 1901. NO. 4. 

President, but far and wide throughout the Dominion. BUSINESS MEN IN THE SENATE. 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. All the credit is certainly not due to Mr. r~\ USINESS men are beginning to mul- 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. Kemp. He had good officers at his back |j tiply. Four men were appointed to 

Limited. and a membership that was beginning to the Upper House during the past 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- , , ■.•««.'»* .,,,,■ , «■ 

cuiate in the Provinces of British Columbia, wake up, but the standing of the board of week, and all are business men, three of 

North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 

Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, p.e. trade in the community would not have whom, by their connection with large and 
Island and Newfoundland. 

ofhobs been what it is to day had there been a man important industries, are widely known in 

Montreal ^Mc^Gm^Stre.t. in the pres idential chair whose qualifica- the commercial world. 

r< Teiephone till' ^ on for the office were less pronounced than The four gentlemen are Mr. A. T. Wood, 

LONDON, ENO. - - - - log Fleet Street, EX.! . ., __ , , ....-.',,«. 

j. M. McKim , those of Mr. Kemp. of the wholesale hardware firm of Wood, 
MANCHESTER, ENQ. - ■ - 18 St Ann Street. 

H. s. Ashbumer, Vallance & Co., Hamilton, and one of the 

WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block. nwAKinPQ in DQircc 

st.john.n.b. . . - No.aMiVk-et^ha?.: . *™ , h v i. ^ers of the Dominion Board of Trade, 

NEW YORK. !- 7 6 H E Un 88th^e?; A *EW further chang* in pncei have and on e of the originators of the Ontario 

Travelling Subscription Agents : f\ taken P lace duri,, & the P ast week ' Cotton Co. Mr. Robert McKay, for many 

T.Donaghy. F.S.Millard. While, of course, the general a member of the firm of Joseph 

Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. , , , ' . • ,. . . 

Great Britain and elsewhere - - - 12s. tendency of values in lines appertaining to McKay & Bros and a shareholder in the 

Published every Saturday. , ., . , , , , ' ' 

c bi Add J Adscript, London. hardware is downward, there are advances Montrea i Rolling Mills Company, and in 

as well as reductions to be reported. the Edwardsburg starch Co., not to men- 
Mrs. Potts sad irons have dropped to tfon other commercial enterprises with 
62^c. per set for polished and to 67j£c. which he was connected; Hon. Lyman 
per set for nickel-plated. The previous Jones, general manager of the Massey- 
quotations were 70 and 75c. respectively. Harris Manufacturing Co., Toronto; Mr. 
The discounts have been increased to 45 George McHugh, an auctioneer in Lindsay, 
HE WAS A GOOD PRESIDENT. per cent, on 10-quart flaring sap buckets ; Ont. Messrs. Wood and McHugh have 

NO retiring president of the Toronto 6, 10 and 14 quart I.C. flaring pails and both sat in the House of Commons. Hon. 

Board of Trade — for a great many creamer cans. The discount was formerly Lyman Jones has been mayor of Winnipeg, 

years, at any rate — is more deserving 40 per cent., at which figure it has ruled and from 1888 to 1889 was Treasurer in the 

of commendation than Mr. A. E. Kemp, for some time. Greenway Administration, Manitoba. Mr. 

M.P., the senior member of The Kemp Iron bench screws, grindstone fixtures McKay was an unsuccessful aspirant for 

Manufacturing Company. and chest handles are all lower in price. Parliamentary honors in 1896. 

When he assumed office, two years ago. Wringers, as noted elsewhere, are also The appointment of business men like 

it is true that the board was recovering lower. these to the Senate raises the ability and 

from the ennui which had characterized it Ebony knives and forks are quoted higher morale of that branch of Parliament, and 

for some time. But Mr. Kemp, putting by some of the English manufacturers makes less potent opposition to its existence, 

^.nto action that same energy and business owing to the scarcity of ebony. By this The late Sir John A. Macdonald set the 

qualities that had proved so potent in advance the prices of the lines mentioned example in regard to business men for the 

the firm of which he is the head, soon have been advanced to figures about equal Senate, when he appointed the late John 

caused a rapid multiplication in the mem- to those of knives and forks with white-bone Macdonald thereto. Neither Sir John nor 

bership of the board, and, what is more handles. his successors strictly adhered to the prin- 

important still, made it a body whose We note as well a rise in the price of ciple, but the principle is gradually asserting 

recommendations and opinions were re- French mariners' compasses, magnifying itself with more force, and for that let us be 

spected not only in the city of Toronto, glasses and goods of that description. truly thankful. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A TUSSLE OVER FIXED PRICES. 



THERE promises to be a lively tussle 
in Greater New York over the ques- 
tion of a minimum fixed price for 
patent medicines, which will, no doubt, 
excite the interest of all business men, 
whether or not they deal in the articles in 
question. 

For some time a movement has been on 
foot to secure minimum prices on proprietary 
medicines, and within the last few days it 
was announced that 98 per cent, of the 
retail druggists of Greater New York had 
signed an agreement to that effect. It was 
further announced that this agreement was 
backed by the National Wholesale Drug- 
gists' Association and the Proprietary 
Association of America, both of which had 
covenanted not to supply retail dealers who 
refused to subscribe to the agreement. 

The following is the schedule of prices as 
agreed upon by the 98 per cent, of the 
retail druggists : All 5, 10 and 15c. articles, 
full price ; all 25 c. articles, not less than 
20c. ; all 35c. articles, not less than 25c. ; 
all 50c. articles, not less than 45c. ; all 60c. 
articles, not less than 55c. ; all 75c. articles, 
not less than 65c. ; all $1 articles, not less 
than 85c. ; all $1.25 articles, not less than 
$1.10 ; all $ 1. 50 articles, not less than 
$1.25 ; all $2 articles, not less than $1.75. 
Infant food and beef extracts are not in- 
cluded in the list. It was decided that the 
agreement should be operative on Jan. 24. 

A similar agreement is in operation in 
several cities of the United States and, it is 
claimed, with success. 

But an obstacle to the success of the plan 
has arisen in Greater New York during the 
last few days. It is none other than the 
department stores which, through the Retail 
Dry Goods Association, have notified the 
promoters of the agreement that they do not 
propose to subscribe to it. 

Nothing daunted, however, a joint com- 
mittee, representing the manufacturers, the 
wholesalers and the retailers who are at the 
back of the agreement, decided on Friday 
last to put it in operation on January 24, 
as originally intended. A letter to that 
effect was sent to all retail druggists, grocers, 
dry goods, department stores and all hand- 
ling patent medicines. 

Our readers will possibly remember that a 



few months ago the courts in the United 
States held that manufacturers or whole- 
salers could refuse to supply goods to 
dealers who neglected to comply, in 
selling them, with the conditions stipu- 
lated by said manufacturers or whole- 
salers. If our memory serves us right it 
was in regard to the very matter of a fixed 
price on patent medicines. 

Prices have for a long time been slaugh- 
tered on proprietary medicines and it is a 
pity that, through the perverseness of a few, 
the success of a scheme should be endan- 
gered which has for its object the discon- 



THE DEATH OF THE QUEEN 

The death of Her Majesty Queen Victoria 
and the accession of King Edward VII , 
are events that the commercial world can- 
not regard with indifference. The Queen's 
personality inspired much of the vigor and 
enthusiasm by means of which British trade 
and dominion have been extended since 
1837. Her pure life and character are 
bright examples for all engaged in commer- 
cial pursuits. Her death is sincerely 
mourned by all her subjects, and the ex- 
pressions of sympathy from Boards of 
Trade, Chambers of Commerce, etc., prove 
that the illustrious name of Victoria was a 
reality and a power in business life. 

The new King we greet loyally and 
cordially. He has been a good son, atten- 
tive to all his public duties, a man of wide 
information, travel and knowledge of life. 
No better King could be found to preside 
over a great commercial Empire. 



tinuance of a reprehensible practice. Agree- 
ments are distasteful to most people, but it 
is often necessary to do that which is 
distasteful in order that something which is 
more so may be circumvented. 



BEGAN AT THE WRONG END. 

While the reaction against low-priced 
goods is gathering momentum, there are 
merchants who do not yet appear to be 
influenced by it. An instance of this came 
under our observation a few days ago. 

A gentleman entered a retail store and 
asked for a certain article. He was a man 
in comfortable circumstances and well 
known by the clerk, yet, he was first shown 
the lowest-priced article of the kind in the 
store, and he had to ask no less than three 
times for the quality he wanted before it 
was produced. The clerk began at the 
wrong end, and he is not the only one who 
is daily doing the same thing. 



A CHANCE FOR BUSINESS MEN. 

ONE of the members of the Con- 
servative party is out with a 
proposition to the effect that the 
policy of the Opposition during the session 
of Parliament should be mapped out and 
controlled by a committee of the party^ 
rather than, as hitherto, the details being 
left to the leader. 

The idea is a good one. Not that we are 
concerned in the welfare of the Conservative, 
any more than in the welfare of the Liberal, 
party. But we see in it an opportunity for 
the business men of one of the political 
parties to exercise a greater influence in 
Parliament than under the present system. 

The leader of each ot the political parties 
is usually, at one and the same time, 
a professional man and a professional 
politician. Consequently, he is not as 
well seized of the business requirements 
of tbe country as he who is a unit in 
the commercial world. Now then, with 
the programme or policy of one or both of 
the parties controlled by a committee, there is 
an opportunity for business men being placed 
on that committee. And the influence of a 
business man would obviously be greater on 
such a committee than could be possible 
under the conditions as they obtain to day. 



A NEW LIST ON WRINGERS. 

A new list has been issued by manufac- 
turers of wringers. The purport of them is 

a reduction in prices. The list is as follows : 

Name. size. Price, 

tnches. l'er Doz. 

Mogul 14by3M »"0 

Ajax HbyV* 120 

Ajax 12 by 2 96 

Hamilton 12 > y 2 120 

Paragon II by 15< 81 

Cycle 11 by 1« 62 

Bayslde 11 by 1% 58 

Colonial llbyl'j 58 

Anchor llbylfc 84 

Improved RoyalCanadian 11 by 19< M 

Roval Canadian 11 by IV 50 

Royal Dominion 11 by 1& 80 

Royal American 11 by 1^ 50 

Premier 11 by H» 48 

Novelty lOi-y.'V *• 

Noveltv II by 1% 46 

Novelty 12 by \ 48 

Handy Bench 11 r.y ljf 78 

Universal 10 by 1* 26 

Universal It by m 40 

Crescent . 10 by l ', 

Crescent llliyn 4 3« 

s ar llbylH 50 

Xew Eureka Ilbyl3 4 5i 

Rex 11 l>y I", «8 

Eureka. 10 by 1% I ' 

Eureka i2hyl"- 4 48 

Eureka llh.vl', 41 

Magic 1 » by 1 % 3H 

Magic llbyljf, 40 

Magic 12 by I v. 41 

Dux 10 by I 3 , :: ' 

Dux 11 by!-, 82 

Dux '-by 1". M 

No change has been made in the dis- 
count, which is still 45 per cent., with the 

terms 3 per cent. 30 days, or 4 months. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



TRADE COMMISSIONER FOR ENGLAND. 



AT the last regular meeting of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Canadian Manu- 
facturers' Association, Mr. Geo. H. Hees, of 
the large firm of Geo. H. Hees, Son & Co., 
Toronto, and chairman of the Tariff Com- 
»mittee of the Association, introduced for 
discussion a subject of great importance to 
the manufacturers of Canada ; namely, the 
advisability of urging upon the Government 
the appointment of a Trade Commissioner 
for England. 

In discussing this matter Mr. Hees spoke 
as follows : 

"I desire to draw the attention of the 
Manufacturers' Association to a matter of 
great importance to every manufacturer 
and shipper in Canada; namely, the advisa- 
bility of suggesting to the Government the 
appointment of a Trade Commissioner in 
England on the same lines as has been 
already done in Australia. 

" Every exporter who has ever tried to 
find a market for his goods in England has 
felt the need of some such office as would 
be connected with a Trade Commissioner in 
order that he might be supplied with the in- 
formation that is so necessary. At present 
he has to go single-handed and alone, groping 
for customers, and, after he has covered the 
ground as well as he can, is compelled to 
leave, feeling that he has left undone much 
that he might have done had proper facili- 
ties been at his disposal, such as would be 
afforded by a Trade Commissioner acting 
under the Dominion Government. 

"We all know the splendid trade thathas 
developed between Australia and Canada, 
and we can safely say that 75 per cent, of 
the business now being done between that 
country and Canada is due to the zeal and 
energy of our Trade Commissioner, Mr. 
Larke. 

"An office fitted up in London, to be the 
headquarters of Canadian exporters, with 
all the information that is necessary to 
assist manufacturers and others in securing 
prospective customers, would undoubtedly 
meet with success greater in proportion to 
the much vaster population of the Mother 
Country." 

Mr. Hees then outlined his proposition 
as follows : 

"The appointment of a Trade Cornmis- 
' sioner to Britain, with headquarters at 
London, would be a forward step in the 
direction of largely increasing the export 
trade of Canada, and would prove very 
V popular with the manufacturers and pro- 
ducers of this country. 

"The appointee should be a Canadian 
conversant with all sections from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific. 

"To equip and furnish him for his work 
he should visit all the leading trade centres 
in the Dominion and meet the various 
boards of trade and merchants interested in 
the advancement of Canadian trade. 



"An office should be opened in London, 
furnished entirely with Canadian furniture, 
carpets, etc. , with a sufficient staff to answer 
all inquiries in regard to Canadian trade 
matters. 

"London being the centre of the world's 
business, the Commissioner could easily 
ascertain the possibilities and probabilities 
of trade between other foreign countries 
and Canada. 

"It would be the duty of the Commis- 
sioner to visit trade centres in Britain, such 
as Liverpool, Manchester, Birmingham, 
Leeds, Glasgow, Dundee, Aberdeen, Cardiff, 
Belfast, Dublin, etc., and to come into 
touch with the various Chambers of Com- 
merce in these cities. 

" It should be the object of the Commis- 
sioner to assist in bringing merchants in 
Britain and other foreign countries into 
close relations with the manufacturers and 
shippers of Canada, and for this purpose a 
well-equipped bureau of information should 
be maintained, the function of which would 
be to supply any needed information con- 
cerning foreign markets, the goods sold 
therein, the requirements of the markets and 
the names of the principal buyers in Britain 
and various parts of the world. Foreign 
merchants should be furnished with any 
desired information about goods that are 
manufactured or produced in Canada. A 
comprehensive directory of merchants in 
ever}' part of the world should be kept, with 
full particulars about the lines of goods they 
handle, and with information as to whether 
they areinterestedin Canadian merchandise 
or not. These merchants would be brought 
in direct contact with the manufacturers and 
producers of Canada. Those who deal in 
Canadian goods and desire to increase the 
range of their business in this line, and who 
wish to be informed concerning Canadian 
goods which they could sell to advantage, 
should be invited to make their wants known 
to the Commissioner, with the assurance 
that their inquiries would receive .prompt 
and careful attention. 

"Samples of any merchandise wanted 
might be sent to the Commissioner. These 
samples could be placed in the hands of 
Canadian manufacturers who supply such 
goods, and would enable them to know 
exactly what is wanted by the buyer, and to 
submit prices and terms more intelligently. 

"The Commissioner would be able to 
answer inquiries relative to shipping to any 
foreign countries either via Britain or direct 
from Canada. 

" A trade index of those who manufacture 
goods suitable for export should be kept as 
follows : 

"1st. — An alphabetical list of manufac- 
turers and merchants, with a brief enumera- 
tion of the articles they manufacture and 
deal in, and other information helpful to the 
buyer, 



"2nd. — The names of manufacturers and 
merchants grouped according to the articles 
manufactured and dealt in, an arrangement 
that will be of much assistance to the buyers 
who wish to find manufacturers and mer- 
chants in anj' particular line. 

"3rd. — The registered cable addresses of 
those whose names are contained in the 

index." 

Geo. H. Hees. 

Mr. Hees drew attention to another 
important matter, of which he spoke as 
follows : 

"I would also suggest that the Associa- 
tion ask the Government to recall Mr. 
Larke from Australia and post him on 
present conditions in Canada, as it is six 
years since he went out to Anstralia, and he 
has not since returned to Canada to take 
note of the great changes that have taken 
place in that period. 

"Notwithstanding that Mr. Larke has 
been handicapped by his lack of intercourse 
with the manufacturers and exporters of 
Canada, he has succeeded in building up an 
enormous business. But how much more 
could he do if he returned and met the 
different exporters and manufacturers in all 
the various parts of Canada, and obtained 
from them up-to-date information as to the 
products which they are prepared to offer 
for sale. Could he then return to Australia, 
armed with this up-to-date information, he 
would have something new and original to 
present to prospective customers there, and 
the influence of such personal contact would 
at once be seen in the large trade which 
would result. 

" We all know that great changes in the 
business world have taken place during the 
last six years, especially among manufac- 
turers, and, unless a Commissioner meets 
with the manufacturers every year, or year 
and a half, and learns what is going on, he 
soon becomes obsolete, and from necessity 
talks ancient history. 

"I would further recommend, if we 
succeed in inducing the Government to 
appoint a Trade Commissioner in England, 
that we should have him first become 
thoroughly posted as to the ability of 
Canadian firms at present to compete for 
foreign trade, and that once he has estab- 
lished his office he should return annually 
to confer with manufacturers and shippers 
in the various parts of Canada." 

This important subject will be discussed 
by the Commercial Intelligence Committee, 
and finally dealt with at the next regular 
meeting of the Executive Committee, on 
Tuesday, February 12. 



TORONTO BOARD OF TRADE. 

The following officers have been elected 
by acclamation by the members of the 
Toronto Board of Trade : 

President— A. E. Ames. 

)st Vice-President— W. E. H. Massey. 

Treasurer— J. L. Spiuk. 

Harbor Board— W. A. Geddes and J. T. Matthews. 

The election of the Council, the Board of 
Arbitration and the representatives to the 
Industrial Exhibition will take place on 
Tuesday week. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



GEM JAR PACKAGES. 



tt 



T 



'HERE were more complaints 
about broken gem jars last year 
than in any previous year in our 
history,' said Mr. Fred M. Watt, of the 
Toronto Glass Co., Limited, to Hardware 
and Metal one day this week. " It is, 
therefore, easy to believe that there was 
more breakage." 

" How do you account for the increase?" 
he was asked. 

" I think it was largely, if not altogether 
due to a new regulation made by the rail- 
ways at the beginning of the new shipping 
season last year. They then for the first 
time insisted that all glass should be sent 
over their lines ' at owner's risk.' We ob- 
jected, but to no avail. They insisted on 
double freight charges unless the owner 
took the risk of shipment. Our customers, 
of course, did not want to pay double 
freight charges and took the risk." 

"Why should this clause increase lia- 
bility to damage ?" 

" For the simple reason that freight 
handlers are too human to take as much 
care with packages their company is not 
responsible for safe delivery of as if they 
were responsible. Every freight handler 
soon knew gem jars were shipped ' owner's 
risk ' and treated them accordingly." 

" Is this the only reason you assign for 
a large breakage?" 

"No; not altogether. In sending out 
shipments we fill a car, when it is attached 
to a way freight. The jars for the nearest 
stations are placed in the centre of the car 
so that they can be easily reached. When 
half or more of the car has been emptied, 
there are at each end of the car two piles of 
boxes. If the car were to get an unusually 
bad jolt when being shunted about the 
whole front tier might give way. This may 
have lead to some of the most severe break- 
ages reported. We will try to overcome 
that this year by having the cases so 
arranged that they will not rise from the 
floor in one abrupt tier at anytime, but have 
them packed so that after every unloading 
the tiers will be graded in height from front 
to back." 

' ' Do you not think you could improve 
the package ? " 

" I cannot conceive of any means of so 
doing. You can depend on it that we have 
spent much time and thought in trying to 
devise the most satisfactory package. It 
has been suggested that we increase the 
height and thickness of the cardboard. But 
that would be useless — come out to the 
works and I will show you." 

We went out. Mr. Watt picked up the 
first case he came to in a great pile in the 
storeroom; then continued ; " You see this 



cardboard comes slightly above where the 
jar begins to diminish in size. To bring it 
much above that point would be a sheer 
waste. There is enough there to keep each 
jar separate from all the others, and to keep 
them all from moving in the package. 
Thicker cardboard than we use would be 
practically no safer, but would add con- 
siderably to the cost of the jars to the mer- 
chant. We have tried everything we can 
conceive of to effect an improvement in our 
cases, and the present package is, in our 
opinion, the most practical that has been 
suggested." 

" Do you anticipate as big a loss this 
year as was the case last season ? " 

"No. We have gone into the matter 
with the railways, and they have promised 
to do everything possible to prevent a recur- 
rence of the troubles of last year. The 
most important change will be in the pack- 
ing of goods in the car. If the railway 
companies give satisfactory service, there 
should be very little loss through breakage. 
The ' owner's risk ' regulation will remain 
in force, however." 

" Do many customers ask you to assume 
the risk ? ' ' 

" A fair number do. But they forget that 
if we did that we would have to raise prices 
to meet the loss. If the losses amounted to 
5 per cent., then prices would have to be 
advanced a like proportion. There are a 
number of customers who think we are, as 
sellers, bound to deliver our goods in sound 
condition. These must learn that this is 
not customary in any line of trade, unless 
delivery is specifically agreed to. When 
we deliver our goods to the railway and get 
our receipt, our responsibility ends. It is 
then a matter between the railway and the 
customer. We do our best to send out our 
goods in the best case to stand a trip in a 
freight train. We want to find a better 
package, but have failed, so far, and no 
suggestion that has been made has proven 
practicable." 

Mr. James Kent, of Gowans, Kent & Co. 
was also seen by the representative of Hard- 
ware and Metal. " While there may be 
objection to the proportion of gem jars 
that get broken," he ssid, "there is no 
reason for attributing this to the fault of the 
package. Many kinds have been tried. 
Up to a few years ago the jars were packed 
in straw. These packages caused such a 
storm of criticism because of the muss and 
dirt made in opening them that the glass- 
makers set about to construct a more satis- 
factory case. The present package is 
certainly the most practical that has yet 
been used. There is just enough cardboard 



between the jars for protection without 
adding any unnecessary cost to the jars. 

' ' You can depend on it that, owing to the 
number of companies competing for busi- 
ness, if one of them could conceive of a 
more practical case, they would speedily 
use it — and the others would speedily follow 
suit. 4 

" The real cause of the heavy breakage 
reported has undoubtedly been careless 
handling by trainmen. The package is 
small and light and could easily be tossed 
by one man to another. As some would be 
dropped, breakage would be the natural 
result. 

" We always find it the case that where 
a package is small and light, the breakage 
is heavier than when a larger, heavier 
package is used, as trainmen are able to use 
it more carelessly." 



DISASTROUS FIRE AT MONTREAL. 

The worst fire that has ever visited 
Montreal took place on Wednesday even- 
ing. It started in M. Saxe & Co.'s clothing 
warehouse in the heart of the wholesale 
section of the city, and swiftly spread along 
St. Peter and St. Paul streets, destroying a 
score or more of important warehouses and 
the great Board of Trade building. Among 
the losers are : H. A. Nelson & Sons, 
fancy goods dealers ; Choillan & Co., 
brokers ; Seybold & Sons, wholesale hard- 
ware dealers ; The St. Lawrence Fence 
Co.; W. H. De Courtney & Co., wholesale 
hardware dealers ; The Thos. Davidson 
Manufacturing Co. 

In the Board of Trade building, offices of 
the following were destroyed : Pillow, 
Hersey & Co. ; Peck, Benny & Co. ; The 
Dominion Commercial Travellers' Associa- 
tion ; A. McKim & Co., advertising agents; 
G.T.R. and C.P.R. freight departments. 

The office of Hardware and Metal, 
situated in the Board of Trade building, was 
also destroyed. This will not, however, 
cause any interruption in business. 



Herbert C. Coy has registered as pro- 
prietor of The H. Coy Novelty Co., manu- 
facturers of metal goods, Montreal. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE -. 

Prompt Shipment! 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

NOE PAGE, general merchant, Crysler, 
Ont, has assigned to Daniel Davis, 
Cornwall, Ont. 

C. Primeau, general merchant, St. Ur- 
bain, Que., has compromised. 

* J. A. Plamondon, general merchant, St. 
Raymond, Que., has assigned. 

Hain & Co., general merchants, Midway, 
B.C., are asking an extension. 

Alf. Mercier, general merchant, St. 
Andele (Rimouski), Que., has assigned. 

L. B. Cormier, general merchant, Notre 
Dame, N.B., is offering to compromise. 

E. A. Athinson, general merchant, 
L'Avenir, Que., has consented to assign. 

H. Le Vasseur, general merchant, Fanny- 
stelle, Man. , has been granted an exten- 
sion. 

J. L. Desilets, general merchant, St. 
Gertrude, Que., has assigned to Gagnon & 
Caron. 

A meeting of the creditors of Edgar 
Scott, general merchant, Halifax, has been 
called. 

Rosaire Bourbeau, general merchant, 
Victoriaville, Que., has assigned to J. McD. 
Hains. 

Lalonde & Frere, general merchants, St. 
Benoit, Que., have assigned to Lamarche & 
Bjnoit. 

Assignment has been demanded of F. 
A. Cantwell, general merchant, Franklin 
Centre, Que. 

D. Licker & Co., general merchants, St. 
Cyrile de Wendover, Que., are offering 40c. 
on the dollar. 

Masterson & Griffin, general merchants, 
Trout Lake, B.C., are reported to be asking 
an extension. 

P. J. Stinson & Co., general merchants, 
Singhampton, Ont., have assigned* to 
Thomas Brown. 

The Standard Manufacturing Co., manu- 
facturers of tin cans, etc., Toronto, have 
assigned to George Nicholson. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

S. Prevost & Co., hardware dealers, 
Montreal, have registered partnership. 

Partnership has been registered by The 
Canadian Aluminum Works, Montreal. 

Joseph Arthur, general merchant, Shanty 
Bay, Ont., is advertising his business for 
sale. 

McGowan& Abraham, general merchants, 
Delhi, Ont., have dissolved. J.D.Abraham 
retires. 

Capsey & Frary, general merchants, 
Frelighsburg, Que., have dissolved and 
Wells & Frary continue. 

Reynolds & Reynolds, blacksmiths, car- 
riagemakers, etc., Stroud, Ont., have dis- 
solved. Sylvester Reynolds continues. 

Alfred Doig, hardware dealer, Glenboro, 



True Paint Economy. 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint win sen better 

than lead and oil, because it is more economical to use. 

It is more economical for these reasons : 

1st : Because it covers more surface, gallon for gallon, than lead 
and oil. Figure 360 square feet of S.-W.P., two coats to the gallon, 
and there'll usually be paint left over. 

2nd : Because S.-W.P. lasts longer in good condition than lead 
and oil. You'll find houses all over the Continent painted with 
S.-W.P. that have stood six to ten years of service. 

3rd : Because S.-W.P. saves labor of application. It works easier 
under the brush than lead and oil. The better method of grinding 
and mixing makes it so. 

4th : Because you don't have to spend valuable time making the 
paint. S.-W.P. comes to the painter ready for use. 

Wouldn't talking points like these help you sell more paint ? 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



Nbto YORK. 
MONTREAL. 



BOSTON. 
TORONTO. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY. 




Man., has taken in a partner under the 
style of Doig & Wilson. 

D. W. Anderson & Co., general merch- 
ants, Harrow, Ont., have dissolved. D. 
W. Anderson continues alone. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

A. Guimond, hardware dealer, Montreal, 
has sold his stock at 65c. on the dollar. 

Walter Winning, hardware dealer, etc., 
Armstrong, B.C., is advertising his business 
for sale. 

The assets of Mrs. Gariepy, general mer- 
chant, Lachine, Que., are to be sold on 
January 26. 

The assets of Wright & Co., wholesale 
paper bag dealers, etc., Montreal, are to 
be sold on January 28. 

The stock of The W. F. Horton Co., 
bicycle dealers, etc., London, Ont., will be 
sold by auction on January 29. 

CHANGES. 

Marchant Bros, are starting as paint 
dealers, etc., in Quebec. 

John Graham, general merchant, Valetta, 
Ont., has sold out to Robertson Bros. 

Louis Goldstein, general merchant, Rosen- 
fieldt, Man., has retired from business. 

C. W. Watson, general merchant, Ridge- 
town, Ont., has sold out to Joseph Baker. 

Thomas Label, sawmiller, Fraserville, 
Que., has sold his mill to Price Bros. & Co. 



J. M. Anguish, tinware dealer, Milton, 
Ont., has sold out to Suggett & Co. 

Herbert J. Little, harness dealer, Lindsay, 
Ont., has sold out to The Rudd Harness 
Co. 

H. D. Ashcroft, blacksmith, Nelson, 
B.C., has been succeeded by Reilly & 
Benoy. 

Wm. Beattie & Co., general merchants, 
Ethel, Ont., have sold out to John Mc- 
Donald. 

Guilbault & Cote, hardware dealers, St. 
Boniface, Man., has sold out to Georgine 
Guilbault. 

S. C. Cochrane, general merchant, 
Medicine Hat, N.W.T., has been succeeded 
by Cochrane & Sons. 

F. W. Carscadden, dealer in agricultural 
implements, Strathcona, Man., has sold out 
to John C. Wainwright. 

T. G. Hawthorn has registered as mana- 
ger of the business of the American Axe 
Co., axe manufacturers, at Three Rivers, 
Que. 

FIRES. 

J. Corbett, general merchant, Browns- 
ville, Ont., has been burned out ; partially 
insured. 

DEATHS. 

Robert Millar, of Millar & Co., hardware 
dealers, Moosomin, Man., is dead. 

W. McDonagh, of W. & J. McDonagh, 
potash manufacturers, Perth, Ont., is dead. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL^ 



UNITED STATES COPPER PRODUC- 
TION IN 1900. 

THE regular monthly meeting of the 
Copper Producers' Association was 
held on Tuesday in New York, at 
which the figures of production and exports 
for December, compiled by Secretary 
Stanton, were given out as follows : 

Dec, Nov., Dec., 

Production — 1900. iooo. 1899. 

By U. S. reporting mines 18,724 19,876 20,388 

By outside sources (estimated).. 3,400 3,400 3,400 

By foreign reporting mines 8,483 7,752 7,360 

Exports 11,223 9,508 15.550 

All in tons of 2,240 lb. 

The total production of the mines in the 
United States and the exports for the full 
calendar year 1900 are as follows : 

Inc'se. 
1900. 1899. Incr'se. p.c. 

Produciion 268,787 262,206 6,581 2.9 

Exports 159,602 119,812 39,790 33.2 

The significance of these figures may be 
better appreciated when it is stated that pro- 
ducers allow for a 10 per cent, increase in 
production annually to meet increase in 
demand, whereas the increase in 1900 was 
less than 3 per cent. One reason for this 
probably is that the older mines devoted 
their attention to poorer grades of ore and 
rock which can be worked at a profit at 
current prices for copper, saving richer 
grades until later. 

Production and exports for a series of 
years compare as follows : 

Production. Enports. 

1900 268,787 150602 

1899 262,000 119,812 

1898 , 235,000 143,1x5 

1897 216,000 129,210 

1896 203,922 125,605 



IMPROVEMENTS IN LANTERNS. 

We would call the attention of the many 
readers of Hardware and Metal to The 
Ontario Lantern Co.'s advertisement on 
page 17, where they show the new century 
"Banner" cold-blast lantern. 

An embossed or corrugated lantern is an 
entirely new departure, which not only adds 
greatly to the appearance, but has the effect 
of strengthening the same very materially. 

They have several new features combined 
in this lantern, all of which have been 
patented. 

The company are now in a position to 
supply the jobbing trade with samples for 
their travelers. 

The "Banner" will undoubtedly sell 
well during the coming season. 



WILL EXECUTE ALL CONTRACTS 

J. Watterson & Co., commission hardware 
and oil merchants, Montreal, have issued a 
circular to the trade stating that, owing to 
the fact that some of their competitors had 
asserted that their quotations for linseed oil 
sent out on November 28, 1900, were 
bogus, and that they would not be able to 



fill their contracts made on those quotations, 
they wish it thoroughly understood that the 
quotations were not bogus or issued with the 
object of depressing the market, and that 
they are ready to fill all orders booked by 
them on the basis of said quotations. They 
furthermore make the offer to forfeit $500 to 
any charitable object if any of their com- 
petitors can produce facts to show one 
instance where they have failed during the 
nine years they have been in business to 
fulfil any of their obligations. 



A WOMAN'S IDEA. 



A WOMAN, according to an exchange, 
thus gives her ideas regarding what 
a hardware store should be : "I like 
to see a look on everything in the store that 
seems to tell me I am welcome. I try to 
keep my own home in order and when I go 
out calling, either socially or on business, I 
want to find matters in such good shape 
that I can learn something about the ever- 
lasting fitness of things. If 1 see a store 
with dirty windows, I stay out. Things 
that are dirty on the outside are sure to be 
dirty within, and I don't want them. If the 



windows look all right but the goods in the 
store are not kept in order, I am quickly 
out on the street again. I don't like to 
trip over coal hods or bruise my knees 
against a stray keg of nails, but I do like 
to see all the goods nicely arranged, and in 
such a position that there is no trouble in 
either showing or looking at them. I like 
to be waited on by a courteous and accom< 
modating clerk, not by one who acts as if 
he were performing an act of condescension 
in waiting on me at all. I especially object 
to the clerk who thinks that shirt-sleeves 
are good form behind the counter, whose 
finger-nails are in mourning, or who indi- 
cates other evidences of ill-breeding. It is 
a positive pleasure to go into some stores 
but positively disagreeable to go into others, 
and I keep away from these others as far 
as possible. I know it is said that women 
are a good deal of a nuisance about a store 
— sometimes — but I notice that they pur- 
chase a good many goods and I think that 
their peculiarities as buyers ere worth cater- 
ing to by the owners if they have any desire 
to increase their business. Besides, we 
women have a habit of talking, and if one 
of us doesn't like a store the others are 
likely to hear about it." 



IVER JOHNSON 



p 



ROGRESSIVENESS 

OPULARIZES 

RODUCTS 

ROTECTS 

RICES AND 

RESERVES 

ROFITS 



The Iver Johnson Bicycle 

-Is- 

An Honest Cycle at an Honest Price. 

Send for new illustrated catalogue showing new improvements. 

Harry Elkes and Major Taylor, Champions of the World, 
ride the Iver Johnson Racer. 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 

FITCHBURG, Mass. 



Branches— New York-99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 364 Main St. 



WIRE RODS ! ♦ 

Drawn to Decimal Sizes, Cut and Straightened, 
In Uniform Sizes. Prompt Shipment. 



Chalcraft Screw Co., Limited, Brantford, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS 

37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

PRUNING 

SHEARS 



&C0 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 





No. 0— 9-inoh, Cast Steel Blades, Japanned Handles, 
Spiral Brass Springs. 



" BOXER'S " 

8-inch, Flat Spiral Steel Springs, Black 
%% " " " Bow Handles. 

TREE PRUNERS 




Complete, with Pole, 6. 8, 10 and 12 feet. 



"KEYSTONE" Dehorning Shears. 



SHIEEIr? SHE^HS. 





" BOKER'S " 

No. 1500— 11-inch, Bent. 
1501—12- 
6654 B— 11- 



BURGON & WILKINSON 

No. G 5— 6-inch. Blades Half Polished. 

K 20— 5 % -inch, 6-inch, 7-inch, Blades Full Polished. 





No. K 22— 6-inch Blades, Full Polished. 



No. 4— 5-inch Blades, Polished, Trowel Handles. 



OUR PRICES 
ARE RIGHT. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



Graham Wire and Got Nails are the Best. 



WE SHIP 
PROMPTLY. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



DOMINION INSOLVENCY LEGISLATION. 

THE VIEWS OF BUSINESS MEN REGARDING ITS NECESSITY. 



ALTHOUGH Mr. Fortin, M.P.,:who 
has been the particular champion 
in the House of Commons of a 
Dominion bankruptcy law during the last 
few years, has declared that he will not 
introduce a bill for that purpose at the 
ensuing session of Parliament, the question 
is by no means a dead one, as will be 
gathered from the following interviews with 
some of the leading merchants in Montreal : 

ATTITUDE OF THE BANKS. 

Mr. James Elliott, general-manager of 
the Molsons Bank, says the banks are not 
opposed to an insolvency law that would 
afford a means of giving a just, speedy and 
equitable division of estates among-Hlje 
creditors and that would prevent dishonest 
merchants from obtaining a clearance which 
they find no difficulty in getting at the 
present moment. He believed, too, that 
the law should be made general all over 
Canada, and thus remove the deficiencies 
in several of the Provincial Acts in opera- 
tion now. But he is opposed to any measure 
that would disallow the banks having the 
estates of 

TWO PERSONS AS SECURITY FOR THEIR 
PAPER. 

This is one of the understandings upon 
which banks discount notes — they must have 
two names upon them. "Banks," said 
Mr. Elliott, "do not do business on ordinary 
business principles; they do not turn over 
goods at high profits like ordinary business 
concerns ; their rates of interest are low, 
consequently their returns must be sure. 
We cannot afford to incur any losses, so we 
must have two names on the paper we hold 
or we shall have to refuse to put money out 
on interest. So, you see, that any insol- 
vency bill introduced into Parliament con- 
taining a provision to the effect that the 
banks cannot come upon two estates to 
recover the full value of the paper they 
hold will not meet with our approval so far 
as that part of the measure is concerned. 
Otherwise, I cannot see why the banks 
should be opposed to improved insolvency 
legislation. In fact, they ought to favor 
it." 

A commercial man of the highest standing 
in Montreal, who does not wish his name 
disclosed, gives his opinion on insolvency 
matters as follows : 

INSOLVENCY LAW BADLY NEEDED. 

"We need a Dominion insolvency law 
very badly. Each of the Provinces has 
grievances that are decidedly vexatious, 
particularly to the wholesale merchants of 
Montreal. In Ontario, Manitoba and the 



Territories we have to meet chattel mort- 
gages, which pop up here and there and 
everywhere, giving undue preference to 
certain creditors. We have a case on hand 
just now in Ontario where 

A BANK'S CHATTEL MORTGAGE TAKES 
EVERYTHING. 

"In the Maritime Provinces we meet 
with the same preferences." 

"But are these not registered ?" 

" Yes, they are. But what good is that 
to us when merchants can give chattel 
mortgages after they have bought goods 
from us." 

" Is the Quebec law satisfactory ?" 

r IHE QUEBEC LAW. 

" The law as we have it in Quebec is the 
most satisfactory in the JQominion, but it is 
not an id»jj|* law. H L. is too elastic. We 
can make a demand o4*assignment here, 
but it can be contested, and while it is being 
forced the debtor can dispose «f all his 
goods. The law is not quick and ps^cjical 
enough." 

EXCESSIVE CHARGES. *\ 

"What about excessive §harges ?" 
"To-day they are certafnly outrageous 
and should be regulated as suggested by 
Mr. Fortin in his draft of a bill. My opinion 
coincides with Police Magistrate Denison, of 
Toronto, who says that the lawyers are 
virtually robbing the community in the 
slick way they have of doing things. We 
have just had to deal with a case where an 
estate should easily have paid 75 c. on the 
dollar, but after the lawyers had preyed to 
their full satisfaction it paid only %c. on the 
dollar. These official notices of assign- 
ment, notices of meetings and all the rest of 
the tomfoolery form useless and needless 
expense. As Mr. Fortin suggests the 
assets of an insolvent should be put into the 
hands of the creditors who own it, not into 
the possession of any official receiving." 

THE PRIVILEGES OF THE BANKS. 

" Have the banks too much privilege ? " 
' ' Most decidedly they have. Why should 
they have a preferred claim over any other 
creditor ? A bank can register its claim 
with the other creditors, but while the estate 
is being settled it goes on collecting on the 
paper it holds, and, then, when the time of 
giving dividends comes, it registers the bal- 
ance of the claim which it has not collected. 
Thus it gets 100c. on the dollar for part of 
its debt which generally amounts to the 
whole. That is not right. The banks 
should hand over the paper they hold when 
an insolvent assigns." 



"Do you think Mr. Fortin should intro- 
duce his measure this session?" 

"Considering the needs of the country 
he should. Times are good now, and the 
present is the best time to put such a 
measure into operation. However, as there 
are so many lawyers in Parliament, who 
make their livelihood out of the existing 
state of affairs, I suppose Mr. Fortin runs 1. 
slim chance of having his bill passed if he 
should introduce it, and I don't blame him 
for not undertaking a task foredestined to 
bear no fruit." 

VIEWS OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE CHAMBRE 
DE COMMERCE. 

Mr. L. E. Geoffrion, manager of L. 
Chaput, Fils & Cie, Montreal, is an earnest 
advocate of a Dominion insolvency measure. 
He is president of the Chambre de Com- 
merce, and he is striving to have a powerful 
deputation go to Ottawa to represent the 
commercial organizations of Montreal and 
urge the Government to remedy the existing 
evils. He is much opposed to the present 
methods of allowing preferences, and con- 
siders the privileges legislated to the banks 
extremely unjust. 

' ' Why should the banks not be classed 
as ordinary creditors?" said he. "They 
jnaJje 6 per cent, on their money, while we 
mjfce'^o. more than 7 per cent, and have to 
handle gVods. Why should these powerful 
corporation!' be allowed a preference ? It 
is the height of injustice. In Ontario, the 
banks ar$ allowechto seize the goods we 
ship our customers and hold them on their 
accoun^ and th'elh we have to whistle for 
the payment of the goods. The banks 
have no right to get a chattel mortgage on 
goods that are not paid for, and the sooner 
we have legislation to make such seizures 
criminal the better it will be for the com- 
mercial prosperity of this country. 

"We want an insolvency law to cover 
the whole Dominion, and I want to see the 
Government take hold of the matter." 



BUSINESS WILL GO ON AS USUAL. 

The fire which destroyed the Montreal 
premises of H. A. Nelson & Sons is not 
likely to seriously interfere with the firm in 
supplying the grocery trade, for the broom 
factory is in Toronto, and the branch busi- 
ness there also carries in stock such lines 
as woodenware and cordage. g 



Arbuckle Bros, have started as dealers in 
agricultural implements, etc., in Carleton 
Place, Ont. , 

The Fredericton, N.B., Tourist Associa- 
tion have appointed the following officers : 
Chairman, C. F. Chestnut; treasurer, F. B. 
Edgecombe, and secretary, R. P. Allen. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A BUSINESS OF ADVERTISING. 

THAT manufacturers would reap far 
greater profits from their advertise- 
ments if they put the same business 
methods into advertising as they do in the 
other branches of their business is so often 
asserted, that, like many another self- 
evident fact, many allow it to pass un- 
heeded. 

A business man, a manufacturer of steam 
appliances in New York City, recently con- 
solidated his business with a rival. The 
two men had carried the same-sized adver- 
tisements in the same papers. The first 
mentioned manufacturer had made a study 
of catchy advertisements ; made his own 
drawings, and originality stood out all over 
them. You could not turn the page where 
his advertisement was located without seeing 
and stoping to examine, perhaps to criti- 
cize his characteristic advertisement. The 
other manufacturer had used one plain, 
stereotyped, dignified, unchanged advertise- 
ment. After the consolidation the new 
concern took up the question of advertising, 
and, as might be expected, they each held 
divergent views as to its value. The result 
was a comparison of results, when the 
remarkable fact appeared that the man with 
the carefully-prepared advertisements had 
received some seven times as many re- 
sponses to his advertisements as had the 
other. 

Advertising is just as much a part, and 
an important part, of a manufacturer's 
business as is selling, since it is done as a 
means of selling. Why not, then, make it 
the most effective possible. 

Business men read a man's characteristics 
in advertisements. A wide-awake manu- 
facturer will do wide-awake advertising. 
His advertisements will reflect his business 
methods and genius. An up-to-date 
advertisement does not emanate from a dull 
or ultra - conservative manufacturer. A 
man's policy and genius are disclosed in 
his advertisements. The advertising pages 
of all leading papers in these later times are 
replete with genius and made beautiful with 
fine cuts. To such a point have these ideas 
been carried that the advertising columns 
of our standard industrial papers are read 
with as much interest as are the editorials. 
And often more can be learned from the 
advertising columns than from the reading 
pages. This fact enforces the necessity of 
.attractive advertisements. — " Lapis," in 
Age of Steel. 



The following officers have "been elected 
by the Portage la Prairie, Man., Board of 
Trade : President, A. H. Dickins ; vice- 
president, W. Bell ; secretary -treasurer, 
H. W. B. Douglas ; council — E. Brown, 
W. J. Cooper, Geo. Davidson. J. A. Mar- 
shall, C. R. Garland, C. S. Burley, W. J. 
May and Horace Ormond. 



HIGH 

GRADE 

PAINT 





rid^ou do pay a little more, isn't it 
'eryto have a good trade and customers 
satisfied ? High-grade paints — Pure paints. 
RAMSAYS PAINTS will satisfy your cus 
tomers, because they are paints made right 
— pure paints — best paints. 

RAMSAYS PAINTS cannot compete in 
price with the cheap paints — and they don't 
intend to — but they will compete in quality 
with any paints made, and the price is not 
high. Dealers can make money handling 
Ramsays Paints. Write us and see. 



A. RAMSAY & SON 

PAINT MAKERS 

Est'd 1842 

MONTREAL 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 

Ends Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamond Stove Back. 



■m i i ■ 1 1 mwj.| .| .rn-«. ii i ■■i . iii m b ; h 



Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 

Patented March 14th, 1893. 





For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. R. WOODY ATT & CO., Guelpb, Ontario. 



Here it is S^T 

THE NEW CENTURY 

BANNER 
COLD BLAST 
LANTERN 

(Patented January, 1901) 

Possesses the following advantages over 
all other makes : 

Handsome in Design. 
Perfect in Construction. 
Magnificent Light— 20 Candle Power. 

The Lantern of the age for outside light, either on 
land or sea. Every BANNER Lantern has a brass 
plate bearing our name and guarantee. 



The Ontario Lantern Co., 

Hamilton, Ont. 

WALTER GROSE, Montreal, 

Sole Selling Agent. 




is 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 

^3> P 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, January 25, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

TRADE shows a decided improvement 
this week. Retail merchants are now 
through stock-taking, have settled the 
year's accounts, and are looking through 
the stocks for shorts. Quite a number of 
letter orders have been received this week 
for seasonable goods. All shelf goods are 
moving freely, and some lines of heavy 
goods are in steady request. The travellers 
are meeting with good success in their 
search for spring orders, and good quan- 
tities of freezers, green wire cloth, netting, 
rubber hose, screen doors and windows, 
churns, building paper, etc., are being 
booked for spring shipment. In fact, the 
season's business is opening up satisfactorily 
in every way. The market is steady, and 
manufacturers seem to be so busy that they 
are stiffening in their attitude. Market 
changes have been few this week. The list 
on *' Royal Dominion" and "Rcyal Cana- 
dian " wringers has been reduced from $58 
to $50 per dozen, the discount remaining at 



45 per cemv, and the lisfpri<;e of " Ajax " 
has been reduced to $120 from $124 ; all 
other grades remain unaltered. Common 
sad irons have been slightly reduced, and 



£5 to $3.60 per 100 
shoe 



are now selling at 

lb. The discount on shoe nails has been 

slightly changed, and Swedes shoe nails, 14 

gauge and heavier, are now selling at a 

discount of 65 per cent. Horseshoes are 

scarce. 

Barb Wire — A few lots are being 
booked for spring shipment, but business 
for immediate shipment is dead. The price 
is still $3.20 f.o.b. Montreal in less than 
carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — The market shows 
no change. Business is very quiet. We 
quote : No. 5, $4.25; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge 
$3.55 ; No. 9, $3.10; No. 10, #3.75; 
No. 11, $3.85 ; No. 12, $3.25; No. 13, 
23-35; No- '4. $4-25; No. 15, $4-7S> 
No. 16, $5.00. 

Smooth Steel Wire — The demand is 
limited, but a very few lots of hay-baling 
wire are moving. The price is $2.80 per 
100 lb. 



<f 



Fine Steel Wire — The usual inquiry 
has been experienced. The discount 
17% percent, off the list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — There is 
nothing special to note. Discounts are 55 
and 2}4 per cent, on brass, and 50 and 
2/4 per cent, on copper. 

Fence Staples — A small trade is passing. 
We quote : $3.25 for bright, and $3.75 for 
galvanized, per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — This is naturally a quiet 
season in nails, but business is quite up to 
the average for immediate shipment. There 
is little heavy business being done. We 
quote $2.85 for small lots and #2.75 for 
carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Gananoque, and St. John, N.B. 

Cut Nails — There have been no new 
developments in the nail business. Trade 
is confined almost entirely to immediate 
wants. We quote as follows : $2.35 for 
small and $2.25 for carlots; flour barrel 
nails, 25 per cent, discount; coopers' nails, 
30 per cent, discount. 

Horse Nails— A good trade is being 



UNIFORMITY of SIZE is another great feature to be considered in the 




less Milk Can Bottom 



Jl^uw's Sanson Bottom 

. ttKS HO SUMS TO COUt'CT OtKI 



Old St\l& 

TEARS Tttt FLOORING. 



This is a great conveni- 
ence in fitting body 
tin to bottoms. 

Slides easily. 

No sharp corners to 
tear the flooring. 

Will always wear round. f 



LONDON. 



Patented July 23, 1900. 

HE McCLARY IVI 

TORONTO. MONTREAL. WINNIPEG. 

A SURE THING because it's Guaranteed. 



VANCOUVER. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FIXING-UP TIME 

follows stocktaking and is the best time to put in 



d 




BENNETT'S PATENT SHELF BOX 

and the 

KLONDIKE SAMPLE HOLDER. 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., Toronto. 

N.B.-Don't forget we make boxes to tit your pre- 
sent she.ving. 



Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO, 

31 Wellington street, MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPIPE. 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

»E CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 

Manufacturers of 

Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
s required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



done at 50 per cent, on standard, and 50 
and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Horseshoes — Jobbers say that the de- 
mand for horseshoes this year has been 
phenomenal. Supplies are light and the de- 
mand heavy. We quote : Iron shoes, light 
and medium pattern, No. 2 and larger,$3.5o; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 
2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.00 ; X L steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.85 ; feather-weight, all sizes, $4.85; toe 
weight steel shoes, all sizes, $5. 95 f.o.b. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, ioc. extra. 

Poultry Netting — Business on spring 
account is still going on. The discount is 
50 and 5 per cent. 

Green Wire Cloth — The price remains 
as before at $1.35 per 100 sq. ft. Business 
is being freely done. 

Freezers — Trade in freezers is in full 
swing this week. The demand has opened 
up well. 

Wringers — Orders for spring shipment 
are now being booked. Within the past 
week the list price on Royal Dominion and 
Royal Canadian has been lowered from $58 
to $50 per doz. The discount remains at 
45 per cent. off. Ajax wringers have alsc 
been marked down from $124 list to $ 120. 
All other grades remain the same. 

Sad Irons — Common sad irons have 
been reduced about 20c. per 100 lb. by the 
manufacturers this week and are now 
quoted at $3.55 to #3.60 per 100 lb. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Trade 
has opened up well and fair orders for 
screens have been booked. We quote : 
Screen doors, plain cherry finish, $8 25 per 
doz.; do. fancy, $ 11. 50 per doz ; windows, 
$2.25 to $3.50 per doz. 

Screws — Like other shelf goods, screws 
are in good demand. Quite a number of 
shipments have been made this week in re 
sponse to letter orders. Discounts are 
as follows : Flat head bright, 85 per 
cent, off list ; round head bright, 80 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 77 j£ percent.; round 
head brass, 70 per cent. 

Bolts — The demand for bolts is fair. 
Discounts are as follows : Carriage bolts, 
65 per cent.; machine bolts, 65 per cent.; 
coach screws, 75 per cent.; sleigh shoe 
bolts, 75 per cent.; bolt ends, 65 per cent.; 
plough bolts, 50 per cent. ; square nuts, 
4^c. per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 42^c. 
per lb. off list; tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; 
stove bolts, 67%. percent. 

Building Paper — Shipments from stock 
are small, but a good deal of business on 
spring account is being done. We quote 
as follows : Dry sheathing, 30c. per roll ; 
cyclone dry do., 42c. per roll ; straw do., 
30c; heavy straw do., $1.40 per 100 lb.; 



TINPLATES 

" Lydbrook," " Grafton," 
" Allaways," etc. 

TINNED SHEETS 

" Wilden " Brand and 
cheaper makes. 

AU s zes and gauges imported. 



A. C. LESLIE k CO. 

MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE H. MeDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 



We have in stock 



PIGr TIN 
ING-OT COPPER 
LAKE COPPER 
PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASBOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



""THERE is an old saying : " You cannot get too 
* much of a good thing." That is why we 
keep harping at you about 

ELASTILITE VARNISH. 




If you get tired reading our ads. about it, send for one of 
the above cabinets and you will never have to tire yourself 
talking to sell it. One can sells another. You cannot afford 
to be without it. 

-MANUFACTURED ONLY BY- 

!S Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont 

Large new stock of all leading lines. 
Headquarters for . . . 

Linseed Oil Screen Doors 

Paints Lawn Mowers 

Window Glass Cordage 

Building Paper Paris Green 

Harvest Tools Etc. 



Also large and full assortment of 

CUTLERY 



of all leading manufacturers. 



I.X L , dry sheathing, 65c. per roll ; 
cyclone, tarred do., 50c. per roll ; tarred 
ordinary do., 40c. per roll ; tarred felt, 
Ji.6o per 100 lb.; ready roofing, 2 ply, 75c. 
per roll ; 3 ply, $1 per roll. 

Rivets — Trade continues unchanged. 
The discount on best iron rivets, section, 
carriage, and wagon box, black rivets, tinned 
do., coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent. ; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off; copper rivets, 35 
and 5 per cent, off; and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5-lb. carton boxes, are quoted 
at 60 and 10 percent, off list. 

Cordage — The situation is steady to firm. 
Manila is quoted at i3^c per lb. for 7-16 
and larger; sisal is worth 9>£c. per lb. for 
7-16 and larger, and lathyarn g^c. per lb. 

Spades and Shovels — Some business 
is being done at 40 and 5 per cent, dis- 
count. 

Harvest Tools — A few orders are being 
booked for spring shipment at 50, 10 and 5 
per cent, discount. 

Tacks — The feature this week is a change 
in the price of shoe nails, which are now 
quoted from 14 gauge and heavier, instead 
of 15 guage and heavier. Swedes shoe 
nails, soft steel nails and iron nails are now 
quoted at a discount of 65 per cent. Other- 
wise prices are unchanged. We quote : 



Carpet tacks, in dozens and bulk, blued, 
80 and s per cent, discount ; tinned, 80 and 
10 per cent.; cut tacks, blued, in dozens, 
75 and 15 per cent, discount. 

Firebricks — This line continues feature- 
less. The price is $18.50 to $26, as to 
brand. 

Cement — Inquiry is small. We quote : 
German, $2.50 to $2.65; English, $2.40 to 
$2. 50 ; Belgian, $1 .90 to $2. 15 per bbl. 

METALS. 

The market is steady to strong in most 
lines. Pig iron is rather weak. Tin and 
copper seem to be rather firmer in primary 
markets. 

Pig Iron — The market for Scotch pig on 
spot is firm at $24 to $25 for No. 1 Sum- 
merlee. No. I Hamilton is easier, and 
lower, and quoted at $20, although transac- 
tions have occurred below that figure. 

Bar Iron — The market is steady at #1.65 
to $1.70 in small lots. 

Black Sheets — The inquiry is small. 
Prices rule as before at $2.80 for 8 to 16 
gauge. 

Galvanized Iron — A few lots of galvan- 
ized iron are going out, but business seems 
pretty well confined to spring account. We 
quote : No. 28 Queen's Head, $5 to $5. 10 ; 
Apollo, 10^ oz., $5 to $5.10 Comet, No. 
28, $4.50 with 25c. allowance in case lots. 



Ingot Copper — The ruling figure is 
steady at iy}4c- 

Ingot Tin — A small business is being 
done at the base 33c. for Lamb and Flag. 
Lead — Steady at $4 65. 
Lead Pipe — Business is confined to small 
proportions. We quote: 7c. for ordinary and 
7J£c. for composition waste, with 15 per 
cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — A fair business is being done. 
We quote as follows: Black pipe, '/, $3 
per 100 ft. ; ft, $3 ; %, $3 ; %, $3.15 ; 
i-in., $4.50; 1X.J6.10; 1K.jjS7.28; 2 -in., 
$9.75. Galvanized, #, $4.60 ; %, $5.25 ; 
iin., $7.50; 1%, $9.80 ; 1 j£, $11.75 I 2 - 
in., $16. 

Tinplates — There is nothing new to 
note. A seasonable trade is being done 
at $4.50 for coke and $4.75 for charcoal. 

Canada Plate — Trade is not very brisk. 
We quote : 52's, $2.90; 6o's, $3; 75's, 
$3.10; full polished, $3.75, and galvanized, 
$4.60. j 

Tool Steel -We quote: Black Diamond, 
8c; Jessop's 12c-. 

Steel — No change. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, $1.85 ; tire, $1.95 ; spring, $2.75 ; 
machinery, $2.75 and toe caik, $2.50. 

Terne Plates — Trade is quiet and fea- 
tureless. We quote $8 25. 

Swedish Iron— Steady at $4 .25. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



Coil Chain — Some business is being 
done. The tone of the market is firm. We 
quote: No. 6, 1 1 j£c. ; No. 5, 10c; No.4,9J^c. ; 
No. 3, 9c; X-inch, 7yic per lb.; 5-16, 
$4.60; 5-16 exact, $5.10; y%, $4.20; 7-16, 

5400; #, $3-75; 9-16, 53-65; H> 53-35". 

M\$3-25; #.$3-2o; i-in., $3.15. In car- 
load lots an allowance of 10c. is made. 
& Sheet Zinc — The ruling price is 6 to 6Xc 
Antimony — Quiet, at 10c. 

GLASS. 

Business on spring account is beginning 

to be dene by some houses. For immediate 

shipment, prices are unchanged. We quote: 

First break, 52; second, $2.10 for 50 

feet ; first break, 100 feet, 53.80 ; 

second, 54 ; third, 54-5°; fourth, 54-75; 

fifth, 55.25; sixth, 55-75. and seventh, 

6.25. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

There are no special features this week. 
If anything, business has been on the quiet 
side. A number of the travelling salesmen 
have been laid up with the grippe and a good 
many firms throughout the country com- 
plain of being short handed through the 
indisposition of members of the staff. 
Severe weather has also contributed to quiet 
the demand, except in paris green. This 
article has suddenly sprung into light, and 
the bookings have been pretty heavy. Dry 
colors do not show any great change. 
Kalsomine has been advanced ic. per lb. 
Colors in oil are only in fair inquiry and 
house painting has been seemingly affected 
by the cold weather. Prices of liquid 
paints are well maintained. Varnishes are 
steady. Gold leaf is somewhat easier and 
is now quoted in single packs at $6 per 
pack. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, 56.75 ; No. 1, $6 37^ ; No. 2, 
56 ; No. 3. 55 62}4, and No. 4, 55.25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 
or four months. 

Dry White Lead — 55-75 in casks; 
kegs, 56. 

Red Lead — Casks, 55.50; in kegs, 
55-75- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6j£c; in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7>£c. 

Putty — We quote : Bulk, in barrels, 
$2 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity, 52.15; 
bladders, in barrels, 5220; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 52- 35; in tins, 
52 45 to 52.75 ; in less than 100 lb. lots, 
$3 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 80c; boiled, 83c, 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic. less, 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
*open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and dhawaat 2c per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

Turpentine— Single bbls., 59c; 2 to 4 
bbls., 58c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — 5125 to 51.45 per gal. 

Castor Oil — 85^ to 9#c. in wholesale 
lots, and > a 'c. additional lor small lots. 



OUR METALLIC SKYLIGHTS 

Made in all sizes and styles — for flat or pitched roofs — with or without ventilators — 
glazed with our fireproof glass if desired — every possible variety. 

They a e both light in weight and strong — made from hollow bars of 
galvanized steel or copper. 

Our Halitus Ventilator 

OR CHIMNEY COWL. 

Thoroughly stormproof — with a positive upward draft under all conditions 
that exhausts more cubic feet of air per minute than any other. 

Fitted with or without glass tops to admit light — positively the best 
ventilator made. 

Full practical details of i formation in our Catalogue. 



METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited, ™- Toronto, 



Wholesale Manufacturers. 



Canada 



Seal Oil — 47^ to 49c. 

Cod Oil— 32^ to 35c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
$2.75 to 54 50, as to brand ; coal tar, 53 25 
to 53 75 ; cotton waste, 4j£ to $H C - f° r 
colored, and 6 to 7>£c. for white ; oakum, 
5^ to 6^c, and cotton oakum, 10 to 11c. 

Paris Green — Petroleum barrels, i6|^c. 
per lb.; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, I7^c. ; 25-lb. drums, 18c; i-lb. 
packages, i8^c; j£-lb. packages, 2oj£c; 
i-lb. tins, I9>£c.; 'A lb. tins, 21 j£c. f.o.b. 
Montreal; terms 3 percent. 30 days, or four 
months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The market is still quiet, with little busi- 
ness being transacted. Dealers are paying 
the following prices in the country : Heavy 
copper and wire, 13 to i$J4c. per lb. ; light 
copper, 12c; heavy brass, 12c. ; heavy 
yellow, %y z to 9c. ; light brass, 6yi to 
7c; lead, 2}£ to 3c. per lb.; zinc, 2% to 
2^c; iron, No. 1 wrought, $13 to 514 per 
gross ton ; No. 1 cast, 513 to 514 ; stove 
plate, 58 to 59; light iron, No. 2, $4 a ton; 
malleable and steel, $4. 

PETROLEUM. 

A good trade continues to be done, but the 
demand is for smaller quantities. We quote: 
"Silver Star," 15 to 16c. ; "Imperial 
Acme," \6%. to I7j£c. ; " S C. Acme," 
18 to 19c, and " Pratt's Astral," 19 to 
20c. 

HIDES. 

Tanners are not buying very freely, and 
business is rather slow. Dealers are paying 
7^c. for No. 1 light, and tanners are asked 
to pay 8^c. for carlots. We quote : Light 
hides, 7>£c. for No. 1; 6^c. for No. 2, and 
5>£c. for No. 3. Lambskins, 90c. 



Mr. Stearnfield, representing The Mark- 
ham Air Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich., was 
in Toronto this week. He is said to have 
taken away some nice orders for " King " 
rifles. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, January 25, 1901. 

HARDWARE. 

A LITTLE better business is probably 
being done this week, but still the 
volume, generally speaking, is 
light. It is the general opinion that the 
volume of business is much smaller this 
month than it was for the corresponding 
period last year. Tinware is particularly 
quiet, although it is asserted that it is no 
worse than is usual at this season in pre- 
vious years. Wire nails continue quiet, 
and in fence wires there is little or nothing 
being done outside of booking orders for 
future delivery, and, even in this par- 
ticular, the volume of business is not 
large. In screws, bolts and rivets, 
there is the usual steady trade being 
done. Rope is quiet and featureless. 
In cuttlery, a slightly better trade is 
to be noted. A few orders are being booked 
for green wire cloth, poultry netting, harvest 
tools, and spades and shovels for future 
delivery. There have been a few changes 
in prices this week. French mariners' 
compasses and magnifying glasses are 
quoted higher. On flaring sap buckets and 
flaring pails and creamer cans the discount 
has been increased. A new list has been 
issued on wringers, which shows a decline 
in prices. Prices are also lower on iron 
bench screws, grindstone fixtures, chest 
handles and Mrs. Potts sad irons. Letter 
orders are fair and the same can be said of 
payments. 

Barb Wire — Nothing doing in shipments 
from stock and we hear of no orders being 
placed during the past few days for future 
delivery. We quote 52.97^ f.o.b. for less 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



than carlots, and $2.85 in carlots. From 
stock, Toronto, $310 per ico lb. 

Galvanized Wire— This is dull and 
featureless. We quote : Nos. 6, 7 and 

8, $3-55; No - 9' #3i°; No-. 10. $3-75; 
No. 11, $385; No. 12. #325; No. 13, 
$3.35; No. 14, #4-25; No. 15, $4-7S> and 
No. 16, $5. 

Smooth Steel Wire — A few orders 
for future delivery have been booked in 
oiled and annealed wire and a little has 
been done during the past week in hay-bal- 
ing wire for prompt shipment. We quote 
the base price at $2.80 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — A few orders are reported 
but they are only for small quantities. The 
base price is unchanged at $2.85 per keg 
for less than carlots and $2.75 in carlots. 

Cut Nails — These are still dull and 
featureless with the base price unchanged 
at $2.35 per keg. 

Horseshoes — Just a steady trade is 
to be reported. We quote as follows 
f.o.b. Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, light, medium and heavy, $3.60 ; 
snow shoes, $3 85 ; light steel shoes, $3.70 
featherweight (all sizes), #4 95 ; iron shoes, 
No. 1 and smaller, light, medium and 
heavy (all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; 
light steel shoes, $3.95 ; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4-95- 

HorseNails— Business continues moder- 
ate. Discount, 50 per cent, on standard oval 
head and 50 and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Screws — A fair sorting- up trade is being 
done at unchanged prices. We quote : Flat 
head bright, 85 per cent, off the list; round 
head bright, 80 percent.; flat head brass, 
77 % per cent.; round head brass, 70 per 
cent. ; flat head bronze, 70 per cent. ; 
round head bronze, 65 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — There is the 
usual steady trade being done. We 
quote as follows: Carriage bolts (Norway), 
full square, 70 per cent.; carriage bolts, 
fulls quare, 70 per cent. ; common carriage 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; coach screws, 
75 per cent.; sleighshoe bolts, 75 per cent.; 
blank bolts, 65 per cent.; bolt ends, 65 per 
cent. ; nuts, square, 4>£c. off; nuts, hexagon, 
4V C - off; tire bolts, 67^4 per cent.; stove 
bolts, 67 j£ ; plough bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rivets and Burrs — The demand is 
steady and prices unchanged. Discount, 60 
and 10 per cent, on iron rivets ; iron burrs, 
55 per cent.; copper rivets and burrs, 35 
and 5 per cent. 

Rope — Business is still quiet. We quote : 
Sisal, 9c. per lb. base, and manila, 13c. 
We quote cotton rope : 3-16 in. and larger, 
\6y 2 c.\ 5-32 in., 2i^c, and y% in., 22j£c. 
per lb. 

Cutlery — There is little going out, and 



trade appears to be improving over that of 
the early part of the month. 

Sporting Goods — Some rifles, loaded 
shells and cartridges are wanted, but the 
demand is not brisk. 

Green Wire Cloth — Orders are still 
being booked for future delivery at $1.35 
per 100 sq. ft. 

Screen Windows — Shipments have gone 
forward this week to British Columbia. 
Difficulty was experienced in securing some 
of the sizes to complete orders. 

Wringers — A new list has been issued 
by the Canadian manufacturers. It is lower 
than that which previously existed, while 
the discount is unchanged at 45 per cent. 
Terms 4 months or 3 per cent. 30 days. 
The list will be found on our editorial page. 

Mrs. Potts Sad Irons — The price of 
these has been reduced and we now quote 
No. 55, polished, 62 %c. ; No. 50, nickel- 
plated, 67 %c. 

Harvest Tools — A few orders have 
been booked during the week for harvest 
tools for future delivery. Discount 50, 10 
and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — A little business 
has been done on future account during the 
past week. Discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

Poultry Netting — No orders are being 
taken for present shipments, but a few are 
still being booked for future delivery. Dis- 
count on Canadian is 50 and 5 per cent. On 
English, prices are quoted at net figures. 

Tinware — There has been a reduction 
in the price of certain lines. On ioquart 
flaring sap buckets ; 6, 10, 14 quart I. C. 
flaring pails and creamer cans the discount 
is now 45 per cent, instead of 40 per cent, 
as formerly. The tinware trade is, as a 
rule, quiet, although quite a few milk can 
trimmings have gone out. 

Enamelled Ware — Business in this line 
is still quiet. 

Elbows — The reduction in prices has 
caused an improvement in the trade for 
delivery next fall. There is an idea that 
prices will be a little stiffer rather than 
lower, while the vaiious manufacturers have 
been rather aggressive in securing orders. 

Cement — There is nothing doing. We 
nominally quote in barrel lots : Canadian 
Portland, $2. 80 to $3 ; Belgian, #2.75 to $3; 
English do., $3 ; Canadian hydraulic 
cements, 51.25 to Si. 50; calcined plaster, 
$1.90 ; asbestos cement, 52.50 per bbl. 

METALS. 

While there is not an active trade doing 
in metals, as a rule, the demand is fair for 
this time of the year. Tin has shown a 
steadier tone. 

Pig Iron — The market is quiet with the 
Canadian furnaces quoting $17 for No. 2 in 
100-ton lots. 

Bar Iron — A fair trade is still being done 



[I A l/ry'O The original and only Genuine Pre- 

I II l\ | I i\ paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
wlll»Lil \J 6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, Limitfi 

MANUFACTURERS Ot 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL, 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

YANKEE SNAPS. 

Made in all styles and sizes. 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 




L»rge«t Variety, 

Toilet, H»nd, Electric Power 

ARE THE BEST. 

HigheX Quality Grooming mud 
Sheep-Shearing Machine! 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB OATALoetni TO 
'■"l"> Shaarar Mf*. Co., Vaibna. >.R..rjAi 




NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door Closer, 
They work silently and effectually, and never get 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN * SONS, Birmingham. • 



HORSE 
CLIPPERS 



BURMAN & SONS', LIMITED 

Ths Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses iu South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Bussia's Stables and Field Marshal Lord Boberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 

BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont. 



Pullman Sash Balance Co" 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester. N.Y.. U.S.A. 

On tale all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



at ihe base piice of $1.65 to $1.70 per 
100 lb. 

Pig Tin — While the market is still some- 
what irregular a better tone prevails than a 
week ago. Locally, however, business is 
quieter than # it was with quotations un- 
changed at32 to 33c, according to quantity. 

Tjnplates — Quite a few tinplates are 
going, out showing that the tinsmiths in the 
(gantry are making up stock in anticipation 
of their requirements. 

Tinned Sheets — The demand is more 
active, and there is already some scarcity of 
stocks on the local market. Spring stocks 
have not yet arrived, and wholesalers are 
finding that they will require them earlier 
than was anticipated. 

Terne Plates — These are still quiet 
and unchanged in price. 

Black Sheets — Trade is fair with the 
base price unchanged at $3. 50 per 100 lb. 

Galvanized Sheets— Trade has been 
fair, and a number of orders have been 
booked during the week for spring and 
summer delivery. 

Canada Plates — A fairly-good trade is 
being done, the volume of business being 
larger than was expected at this time. 
Quite a few 5 -box lots are still required. 
Import orders are being booked for next 
fall's delivery. From what can be gathered, 
local jobbers are not going to carry over as 
large stccks of Canada plates as was antici- 
pated. For this they are quite gratified, in 
view of the probable future of the market 
as far as prices are concerned. We quote : 
All dull, $2 ; half and half, $3. 15, and all 
bright, $3.65 to #3.75. 

Iron Pipe — A fair business continues to 
be done in this line. We quote : Black pipe 
% in., $3.00; y % in., $3 00; ]/ 2 in., #3.50 ; 
% in., $3.20; 1 in., $460; i# in., $6.35; 
lyi'xn., $7.55; 2 in., $10.10. Galvanized 
pipe is as follows: yi in., $4.65; ^ in., 
$5.35; 1 in., #725; \% in., $9.75; i*A in., 
$1 1.25; 2 in., $1$ 50. 

Hoop Steel — The demand during the 
past week has been fairly good with $3.10 
as the base price. 

Copper — Ingot copper is rather quiet, 
but a good business is being done in bar 
and sheet. We quote : Ingot, 19 to 20c; 
bolt or bar, 23^ to 25c. ; sheet, 23 to 23^c. 

Brass — Trade continues quiet with the 
discount on rod and sheet still 15 per cent. 

Solder — A fairly good business is re- 
ported in solder for small quantities. 

Lead — The demand is moderate at 
\Va to Sc 

Zinc Spelter — Trade is rather quiet at 
6 to 6^c. per lb. 

Zinc Sheet — A fairly active trade is to be 
noted. We quote casks at $6.75 to $7, and 
part casks at $7 to $7.50. 

FAINTS AND OILS. 

There is no change. Flax seed has ad- 
k/anced in Chicago, but there is no indica- 
tion that this will affect conditions here or 
in Great Britain. Turpentine fluctuates 
somewhat, but is practically at an unchanged 
basis. White lead is firm. There continues 
a good receipt of orders for spring delivery. 
We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6. 87 >£; No. 1, $6.50; No. 2. $6.12)4; 
No. 3,185.75; No. 4,55.37^; dry white lead 
in casks, $6. 



84,000 Daily Production. 
5 Factories. 5 Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sale all 
over the World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R.. 90% Largest Mfrs. 70% of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 



Established 1773 



Manufacturers of Polished. Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 

Designs on application. 
Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : 107 Cannon Street, London, E.C —128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow— 12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par dise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address : Glass, St. Helens. 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 



of every description. 

Reliable Tools at low prices. 




A. SHAW & SON, 52 Rahere St., Goswell Rd„ London, E.C. Eng. The oldest house in the 
trade, lineal successors of the inventor and patentee, J. SHAW. 



Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $5 to $5.25 ; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb.; $5 .25 to #5.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 7 to 7J£c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 8 to 8^c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to S7.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.20; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.35; bulk in bbls., 
$2 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 lb., 
J2.15; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $3. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1-9° 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1.20 to $1.30 per 
gal.; No. 1 quality, $1 per gal. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 to 
ioy 2 c. per lb. and 10^ to 11c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 80c. ; 
boiled, 83c. ; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 79c. ; 
boiled, 82c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 59c. ; 2 
to 4 barrels, 58c, to all points in Ontario. 
For less quantities than barrels, 5c. per 
gallon extra will be added, and for 5-gallon 
packages, 50c, and 10 gallon packages, 
80c. will be charged. 

GLASS. 

A feeling is manifesting itself that prices 
for import will be reduced before long, but 
there is such an absence of definite 
information that there is no certainty 
of a decline. Stock prices are firm. 
We still quote first break locally : Star, 
in 50-foot boxes, $2.10, and 100-foot 
boxes, $4; doublediamond under 26united 
inches, $6, Toronto, Hamilton and Lon- 
don;terms 4 months or3per cent. 3odays. 



OL.D MATERIAL,. 

The market is easy, but prices are un- 
altered. We quote jobbers' prices as 
follows : Agricultural scrap, 55c. per 
cwt.; machinery cast, 55c. per cwt. ; 
stove cast, 35c; No. 1 wrought 50c. 
per 100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, loyic. ; heavy 
copper, \2]/ z c. ; coil wire scrap, 13c. ; 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10 to 
io^c; heavy red brass, loyic ; scrap 
lead, 3c. ; zinc, 2j£c ; scrap rubber, 6^c.; 
good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c; clean 
dry bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 
PETROLEUM. 

The demand keeps brisk. Prices are steady. 
We quote: Pratt's Astral, 17 to i7j£c. 
in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; Ameri- 
can water white, 17 to \7yic. in barrels ; 
Photogene, 16 >£ to 17c; Sarnia water 
white, 16 to i6^c. in barrels; Sarnia prime 
white, 15 to i^YzC. in barrels. 
COAL. 

There is still a big shortage of nut size, 
and delivery of other lines is reduced by the 
shortage of cars. Prices are unchanged. 
We quote anthracite on cars Buffalo and 
bridges : Grate, $4-75 per gross ton and 
$4.24 per net ton ; egg, stove and nut, $5 
per gross ton and $4. 46 per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

French mariners' compasses and magni- 
fying glasses are higher. 

A new list of prices has been issued by 
the manufacturers of wringers. 

The discount has been increased to 45 
per cent on flaring sap buckets, flaring pails 
and creamery cans. 

Mrs. Potts sad irons are quoted lower at 
6zyic. per set for polished, and 67 5£c. per 
set for nickel-plated. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co. are in receipt 
of a shipment of German hardware and 
cutlery, mostly Boker's goods. 

The hockey team of H. S. Howland, Sons 
& Co. on Wednesday night defeated the 
team of the Dominion Bank by 3 to 1. One 
of the staff declares that " Mic-Mac " 
hockey sticks helped to secure the victory. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, January 21, 1901. 

TRAVELLERS are again on the road 
and report a fair amount of busi- 
ness. In the city, however, the 
wholesale houses have an air of profound 
calm, but time is not being wasted. Many 
houses are arranging matters in such a way 
as to handle with the greatest despatch the 
spring rush when it comes. There is every 
expectation of being an enormous amount 
of building and this will mean a corres- 
ponding trade in building hardware. No 
prices have been altered during the week. 

Price list for the week is as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

" 11 4 00 

12 4 05 

" 13 4 2 ° 

14 4 35 

15 * 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 45 

" 16 and 20 3 5° 

10 '. 3 55 

8 3 65 

6 3 7° 

4 3 85 

3 4 10 

Cut nails, 30tobody 300 

20 to 40 3 05 

" 10 to 16 310 

8 3 15 

6 3 20 

4 3 3° 

3 3 65 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 495 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.50 basis. 
Swedish iron, $4.50 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 00 

Spring steel 3 2 5 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 °° 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge ... 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 450 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 1475 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18x24 3 75 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch ... .50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $10 00 

H 1050 

" y i and 5-16 11 00 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 13 50 

H 14 00 

" \L and 5-16 14 50 

Solder .* 21 % 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 16 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 p.c. 

Flat " brass 70 p.c. 

Round" " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57^ p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 42 J4 p.c. 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 60 p . c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 



Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 50c. lb. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

" military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 P-C 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

American, M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 75 

Chilled 7 5° 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G. 5 °° 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

" " plain 7oandiSp.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 24KC. 

Prime white American 23c. 

Water white Canadian 21c. 

Prime white Canadian 19c. 

PAINTS. OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 68 

Less than barrel lots 73 

Linseed oil, raw 87 

Boiled 90 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 25 % 

Eldorado engine 24K 

Atlantic red 27^ 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23K to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil % 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. 11 K 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 t° 5° 5 5° 

51 to 60 6 00 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2% 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 25 

No 1 7 00 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and co'.or. .per gal. $1.30 to $1.90 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

HENDERSON k POTTS' PitlCE LIST. 

Henderson & Pjtts, proprietors of The 
Nova Scotia Paint and Varnish Works, 
Halifax and Montreal, have issued their 
catalogue for 1901. In arranging this new 
catalogue, they have adopted a somewhat 
different plan from that used in forrnrr 
issues, namely, to have, as nearly as pos- 
sible, one uniform discount for all lines of 
goods. Henderson & Potts are sole agents 
in Canada for Brandram Bros., which fact 
increases their facilities for putting first-class 
paints, white leads, varnishes, etc., on the 
market. Their catalogue is a neat, handy 
one, and is worth writing for. 

MONTHLY STOCK LIST. 

The Bourne-Fuller Co., Cleveland, O., 
are sending out the January number of their 
monthly stock list of heavy iron, galvanized 
iron sheets, steam pipe, gas pipe, water 
pipe, rivets, angles, fence channels, steel 
tire, spring steel, Norway iron, steel hoops 
and bands, machinery steel, bar iron, etc. 
These lists are a convenience which every 
cnstomer of this firm should appreciate. 

A NEAT DESK CALENDAR. 

A desk calendar for 1901 has been issued 
by the Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 
It is neat and attractive. On one corner is 
the trade mark of the firm in gold, while the 
calendar itself is printed in red and brown. 
On the back of the calendar are a few re- 
minders for the trade. 



ARE REBUILDING THEIR PLANT. 

The Djminion Snath Co., Waterville, 
Que., whose building and part of their 
plant was destroyed by fire on January 10, 
have issued a circular stating that they have 
already begun to rebuild, and with stock 
saved from the fire, and new stock coming 
in, they expect to fill all their orders 
promptly. 



HENDERSON & POTTS 

HALIFAX and MONTREAL. 



M 



,£ 



lAwHITE LEAD 

^%>^S^REG1STERED TRADE MARK 



Sole Manufacturers in Canada of 

Brandram Bros. 
& Co., London, Eng., 

B.B. 

Genuine While' Lead. 



Brandram's Genuine B. B. is the best White Lead made. It is unequalled for white- 

ness, and fineness and body, and will cover more surface than any other White Lead 

Paint. It is the favorite White Lead in England, Canada, United States, Australia, 

Russia, etc. Made by a special process, and is superior to all other White Leads for 

durability. 

SEND FOR QUOTATIONS. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



AN AUTOMATIC PISTOL. 

THE invention of the automatic pistol 
illustrates an enormous improvement 
upon the ordinary revolver, which 
may be compared in the artillery to the 
invention of the Maxim over other quick- 
firing guns. 

♦The "Browning" is the simplest, the 
most practical, the surest and strongest of 
all. Its most remarkable features are its 
accurate and quick-firing qualities. It 
represents really a perfect weapon. 

Some revolvers have been called auto- 
matic because the ejection of the shells is 
made by one movement, the "breaking" 
of the weapon, but in the 
"Browning" pistol the ejec- 
tion of the empty shells, the 
introduction of the cartridge 
into the chamber, and the 
cocking of the firing pin are entirely auto- 
matically effected by the action of the 
recoil. 

The following are a few of the advant- 
ages of this pistol : 

Rapidity — Seven shots can be fired sujj- ; 
cessively by pressing the trigger sev 
times, and in less time than with any other 
small arm. 

Accuracy — With the revolver, on ac- 
count of the recoil which throws tne barrel 
upwards, the shooter must aim much lower 
than the object in view, and, if the handle 
is tightly gripped, the mouth of the barrel 
rises up when firing. 

With the "Browning" pistol, the recoil 
acts firstly on the sliding mechanism, and 
does not affect the barrel until the bullet 
has left the latter, so that the accuracy of 
the shot is perfect, and is not influenced in 
any way by holding the handle more or less 
firmly. 

Another point that unfavorably influences 
revolver shooting, is that the bullet must 
first of all go from the chamber of the 
revolving cylinder into the barrel, which is 
seldom in a mathematically precise line 
with the cylinder, whereas, in the " Brown- 
ing" pistol, the bullet is placed in the same 
way as with a magazine rifle. Further, no 
loss of gas takes place from the breech as 
it is the case with any revolvers. 

Rapidity and Accuracy — With this pistol, 
the recoil, being largely absorbed by the 
recoil-spring, does not jerk the arm out of 
the firing line; this, combined with the 
easiness of the trigger, allows of much 
quicker firing than a revolver. 

Safety. — The pistol can be carried with- 
out the least danger. The safety-catch can 
easily be worked, but it is made in such a 
way that it cannot be moved accidentally. 
When the firing mechanism is locked, 



which can be seen at a glance, the pistol is 
absolutely harmless. 

Construction. — The construction is sym- 
metrical and of a most graceful shape. 
The weight is well apportioned ; the hand 
being in its natural position renders ac- 
curate aim much easier, and, as there is no 
cylinder as in a revolver, the arm is abso- 
lutely flat and consequently very portable. 

Weight. —The weight of a non-loaded 
pistol does not exceed i % lb. 



"ATLAS" BARN-DOOR HANGERS. 

A. R. Woodyatt & Co., of Guelph, Ont., 
are, this year, placing upon the market, 
through the jobbing trade, the "Atlas" 




The " Browning " Automatic Pistol. 

barn-door hangers with roller bearings, as 
shown on page 8, which they claim will 
equal, and in some respects, excel any 
similiar line made in the United States. As 
this firm have a reputation of turning out 
only the best quality of goods, we feel sure 
the trade will find it to their own advantage 
in future to carry this line in their stock. 



COMPETING WITH THEIR 
CUSTOMERS. 

Editor Hardware and Metal, — I am 
sorry to see by your paper that the retail 
hardware merchants of Montreal are placed 
in the uncomfortable position of having to 
compete for trade with the wholesale houses 
from whom they buy. Fortunately, we 
hardware dealers of Toronto are better pro- 
tected by the wholesale houses, and have 
very few complaints to make about their 
selling retail. The reading of the report of 
the meeting of the Retail Hardware Associa- 
tion in last week's paper reminded me of 
some trouble the Toronto retail grocers had 
with their wholesale houses in regard to the 
latter selling retail some years ago. The Retail 
Grocers' Association approached the whole- 
salers on the matter, and, after a conference 
had been held, the wholesalers one and all 
signed a pledge that they would cease sell- 
ing retail entirely. This declaration was 
printed and a copy sent to each of the 
grocers of the city. 

Thereafter, when any retailer detected a 
case of a wholesaler selling retail, he 
reported it to a committee of retailers, who 
waited on the wholesale house concerned 
in regard to the matter. If this proceeding 
was not efficacious for the purpose intended, 
the Grocers' Association boycotted the 
wholesaler who refused to abide by his 
pledge. I remember quite distinctly that 
one wholesaler was boycotted for some time, 
and so successfully that he was finally 
forced to come around and respect the 
wishes of the retail merchants. 

I would suggest that the retailers and 
wholesalers hold a conference and discuss 
the matter frankly. By this means they 
ought to be able to arrive at an under- 
standing. 

Toronto Retailer. 



FIRE NOTICE. 

The fire in the Board of Trade Build- 
ing, Montreal, destroyed our city office 
only. All our works are running as 
usual and orders are being filled with 
our usual promptness. 

Pillow & Herscy Mfg. Co., 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL. 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



VERDIGRIS DUETO COPPER BOILERS 

IN his report to D. Stewart, acting warden 
of the St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary, 
Quebec, the medical officer of the insti- 
tution, L. A. Fortier, drew attention to the 
danger of using copper-lined boilers and 
pipes for culinary purposes as follows : 

" The said boilers being of pure copper 
with their long pipes for the escape of 
steam, I was compelled to examine them 
and inquire if there had been some verdigris 
observed inside of the said boilers and 
pipes. I received the assurance that no 
verdigris had been observed and that these 
pipes were kept perfectly clean by the steam 
running through the said copper pipes. My 
fears for a good while remained silent, but 
in presence of the large number of diseases 
in the alimentary canal of the convicts, I 
lately pushed an investigation so far as to 
discover numerous warts of verdigris grow- 
ing inside of the said copper pipes. 

" Copper does not change in dry air, but 
in moist air becomes covered with a green 
coat of carbonate, known as verdigris. In 
the present case the large and long surface 
exposed to the moisture is under tbe most 
favorable circumstances for the production 
of the said carbonate of copper, a poisonous 
salt of powerful action on animals. The 
soluble salts of copper are no more corrosive 
when largely diluted, but their action is but 
irritating or inflaming. The carbonate of 
copper is one of the soluble salts of the 
metallic copper. 

' • Experience teaches that copper becomes 
poisonous with time in small doses. In the 
present case, we are in presence of fraction- 
ally copper daily consumers. The elimin- 
ation of copper is slow, being operated by 
the mucous membrane of the alimentary 
canal, the salivary glands, the liver and the 
kidneys. 

" No wonder now that an immense sur- 
face of metallic copper being exposed to an 
easy production of verdigris, a soluble salt, 
becomes an active factor in the generation 
of a multitude of diseases in the alimentary 
canal of the convicts. 

" But every convict is not equally apt to 
become sick by copper ingestion ; it is of 
daily observation as for many other noxious 
substances. The five large boilers actually 
in use are in bad order, being now coated 
with tin. The present cooking system is 
a dangerous, manifestly a dangerous one. 

" And I terminate my report with a re- 
mark taken from page 575 of Dispensatory 
of the United States : ' Vessels of copper 



which are not coated with tin should not be 
used in pharmaceutical or culniary opera- 
tions ; for, although the metal uncombined 
is inert, yet the risk is great that the vessels 
may be acted on and a poisonous salt 
formed.' " 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

WM. HODGSON, architect, Ottawa, is 
preparing plans for a new public 
school on Wellington street, 
Ottawa. 

A new Presbyterian manse is being built 
at Lyn, Ont. 

Work has been started on the Medical 
building for Queen's University ^ Kingston, 

Ont. ^Vto* '*' 

The Vancouver Times, in a recent ed^j 
torial article, declared that a new^hrg^, 
school is needed in that city. 

Architect Ellis, Kingston, Ont., is pre- 
paring plans for a residence which he will 
build for John Marshall, M.A.] The new 
residence will be located on Union street. 

Building permits have been granted in 
Toronto to Wm. Moss for a pair of semi- 
detached houses on Arthur street, to cost 
$3,800, and to Geo. Isaac, for a pair of 
semi detached houses at 18 and 20 Dupont 
street, to cost $4 400. 

A deputation representing the Alexandria 
school for girls, East Toronto, have asked 
the Ontario Government for a grant of 
#2,500, or half the cost, to erect a laundry 
and assembly hall. Premier Ross, in reply, 
stated that the Government would make the 
grant if possible. 

Arthur Thompson, Ottawa, has had plans 
prepared by Mr. Baker, architect, New 
York, for an office building on the north- 
east corner of Sparks and Metcalfe streets. 
The building, which will be of stone and 
pressed brick, will be 66 x 99 ft. in size and 
six storeys high. The estimated cost is 
$140,000, but in Ottawa it is probable that 
the work can be done at a figure somewhat 
below the estimate. Modern conveniences 
will be installed throughout. It is proposed 
to start the building early in the spring and 
rush it through to completion. 



by the destroyers of plumbing in vacant 

houses. 

Jt 

The police might be assisted by a charge 
in the law which would "surround the sale 
of second-hand plumbing materials with 
some safeguards. If the vendor of old 
lead had to register his name and address, 
every transaction could be traced, and 
greater risks would attend the sale of the 
booty secured in these raids upon the 
plumbing of vacant houses. — Telegram, 
Toronto. 



FREE TRADE IN OLD LEAD. 

It is a disgrace that plumbing worth #500 
or $1,000 should be ripped out of the interior 
of a house and sold by thieves for what it 
will bring as old junk. 

The question is raised as to whether the 
demands of the junk shop have not a tend- 
ency to create the supply which is furnished 



TORONTO PLUMBERS TO MEET. 

For some time the Toronto Journeymen 
Plumbers' Union have been in negotiation 
with the Toronto Master Plumbers' Associa- 
tion, with a view to secure shorter hours 
and an advance in the rate per hour. 

The minimum rate is now 27 %c. per 
hour, the masters having agreed to a raise 
of 2^c. in August, 1898, previous to which 
time the minimum rate was 25c. per hour. 
The journeymen now want 31c. per hour. 
They further ask that the day's work be 
reduced from 9 hours per day to 8 hours. 

It was reported by one of the daily papers 
on Wednesday that the masters had de- 
cided to forestall the possibility of a strike 
by declaring a lockout. There was no 
ground for the report, as the meeting to 
discuss the matter has not yet been held. 
It was reported also that a conference 
between the masters and the journeymen 
had been held on Wednesday evening. 
This wasalso erroneous, though a meeting is 
to be held this week. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Pelletier & Daniel have registered as 
plumbers in Montreal. 

A. Desmarteau has been appointed cura- 
tor of J. Lafrance & Co., plumbers, Mont- 
real. 

D. McKenzie & Co., plumbers, Winni- 
peg, Man., have dissolved. D. McKenzie 
continues. 

Cornelius Brady has registered under the 
style of The United Incandescent Light Co., 
Montreal. 

Manchester, Robertson & Allison, Limited, 
have been incorporated in St. John, N.B., 
with a capital of #800,000, to generate, sell 
and use electric power, light and heat in St. 
John. 



QUICK WORK. 



The Bennett & Wright Co., Limite''. 
did some quick work on their contract for 
heating the new office building of the Grand 
Trunk Railway's headquarters in Montreal. 
In 10 days, they had the boilers and steam 
pipes in position and the fire started. And 
yet, the contract was one of the largest, if 
not the largest, ever awarded in Montreal. 
The statement made in last week's issue, 
that the contract was for the heating of the 
G. T. R. sheds, was hardly correct. It 
should have read " office building." 



T^ 



CANADIAN 4ARDWARB7AND METAL 



ass. 



GLASS CUTTERS that cut gi 

We have 'em ; You need 'em. Have you the GREEN BOOK ? 
Ask for it. Contains good goods at right prices. 



Smith & Hemenway Co., 

296 Broadway, New York City. 



UTICA DROP FORGE 
& TOOL CO., 




/CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 

1TREAL. 






ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG. CANADA. 



KNOX HENRY 



Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 220% Board of Trade, MONTREAL. 




HORSE NAILS — "C" Brand Horae Nails - 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 
" BRASSITE" GOODS — Gunn Castor Co., 

Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 




Manufacturers ol 

Heating 
Supplies 

Pipe Fittings and Headers. 
Large Manifolds made to Order. 
Steam Traps and Appliances, etc. 



The 



Jas. Morrison Brass 

Mfg. CO., Limited 

^mm. TORONTO. 









THE . . . 

Waggoner 
Extension Ladder. 



XL 



XX 



ww- 



m 



^FH-TFFFFT 



The strongest, lightest and most convenient ladder in the market. The only really satisfactory extension ladder 
made. Pulls up with a rope. Made in all lengths. Also extension and other step ladders, sawhorses, ironing 
boards, painters' trestles, etc. All first-class goods. Write for quotations to 

The Waggoner Ladder Company, Limited, London, Ont. 



E. B. SALYERDS 

Manufacturer of 

Hockey Sticks 

PRESTON, 

Ontario, - Canada. 

The Best Stick. 
Made of Bock Elm. 
Wholesale Trade Only Supplied. 
Ask your Wholesale House for 
the Preston make of Stick. 
Write for Prices. 




LEADER CHURN 

New Century Improvements. 

FOUR DIFFERENT STYLES: 

A— Steel Frame with double r-versible Steel Lever. 
B— Wood Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
C— Steel Frame with Crank. 
D— Wood Frame with Crank. 

Styles A and B may be operatedfrom a sitting 
or standing position. 



Steel Frames and Hoops beautifully ALUMINIZED. 

All LEADER CHURNSare equipped with BICYCLE BALL 

BEARINGS and PATENTED CREAM BREAKERS. 
stands are so constructed that they are particularly strong 

and rigid, and there is nothiDg to interfere with the 

placing of pail in the most convenient position for drain - 

ing off buttermilk. 

It Pays to Have the Best. None are BetterThan the Leader. 
THE ■■ 

Dowswell Manufacturing Co. 




HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents : 



Limited. 



W. L. Haldimand & Son, Montreal, Que. 



Use Syracu 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 



Babbitt Metal 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



Factories 



332 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 
and SYRACUSE, NY. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE IRON AND STEEL INDUSTRY. 



FOLLOWING is the balance of the 
address of Mr. Walter Kennedy, 
mechanical engineer of the Cramp 
Ontario Steel Co., delivered before the 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 
Toronto, on January 17, and unavoidably 
held over from our last issue : 

Dealing with the growth of blast furnaces 
in the United States, Mr. Kennedy said he 
could not go back further than the old 
charcoal furnaces that were operated at one 
time, and had an average output of four or 
five tons a day. Twenty years ago 50 and 
60 tons per day was considered a large out- 
put. He remembered when Lowthian Bell 
came from England to the United States to 
see the blast furnace near Youngstown.Ohio, 
which had an output of 6o tons per day. 
Ten years after that, 200 tons was considered 
a good day's work. Now there were at 
least 10 blast furnaces in the United States 
having a product of more than 600 tons a 
day; in fact, one had averaged 700 tons a 
day for a month. There were people who 
claimed that within the next few years there 
would be furnaces making 3,000 tons a day, 
though this seemed an extravagant estimate. 

" I have been asked what is to be done 
at Collingwood," continued Mr. Kennedy. 
"Our idea is to equip a plant there suitable 
for the present needs of the local markets, 
and, if possible, something additional will 
be exported to foreign countries. 

THE LATEST EQUIPMENTS. 

" It will be equipped with machinery that 
is the latest and best of its kind for every 
department. The intention is to form an 
organization that will be capable of solving 
the different problems as they arise, just as 
Mr. Clergue and his associates have done 
at the Soo, and then encourage and branch 
out into any kind of business that seems 
most profitable and will build up other busi- 
ness in the Province of Ontario. (Ap- 
plause.) 

"Our plans for Collingwood contemplate 
the erection of four blast furnaces, one of 
which will be built immediately ; 10 open- 
hearth furnaces, four of which will be built 
immediately ; and a blooming mill, which 
breaks down large ingots and produces the 
billet that may be put into any kind of 
finished article. (Applause.) There has 
been some talk of starting a wire rod mill, 
as the wire fence business is becoming a 
very large one in the western part of this 
country. There are many lines that could 
be developed to advantage, but we do not 
propose trying to do everything at the start. 
I don't think it possible to try to cover at 
first bo large a ground as The Carnegie 
Steel Company. Even the Carnegie Com- 



pany began in a small way, and developed 
with proper management and skill. 

A SAFE POLICY. 

"Do I think Canada can compete with 
the United States in the manufacture of 
steel for export ? 

"This involves the question of coal," 
Mr. Kennedy answered. It would be 
highly important to put soft coal on the free 
list, so that it could be brought to the works 
and there converted into coke, saving a 
very large amount of fuel that was wasted 
at the coke ovens. In the United States 
they were not up to the Gerrrians in the 
economic use of coal. Every good German 
firm had its plant for the saving of by- 
products, and if proper precautions were 
used, he thought it was possible in Canada 
to compete with the United States. (Ap 
plause.) The Carnegie Steel Company 
had lately purchased several thousand 
acres on the southern shore of Lake Erie, 
where they contemplated building steel 
works, at a cost of several million dollars, 
so as to have their new works on the shore 
of the great lakes. If they could operate 
successfully at that point there was cer- 
tainly no disadvantage in coming a little 
further up the lake. There were many 
arguments now for assembling the raw 
material closer to the ore than the coal, 
because it required about only one-half as 
much coke now to make a ton of iron as it 
did some years ago, and the proportion 
now is about two tons of iron to one of 
coke. 

THE CONSUMPTION OF FUEL 

in the manufacture of iron has been cut 
down at least 15 or 20 per cent, in the last 
five or six years. The probability is that 
the reduction will continue, and if it does 
there will be another great argument on the 
point of cost. Duluth, I think, will become 
a great iron manufacturing centre. It may 
be some time, but it is very probable. All 
the locations on the lake shore in the 
Dominion of Canada will .have a future 
very much of advancement equal to Duluth 
and equal to the United States. There are 
some kinds of manufactures, like the manu- 
facture of fine wire and dental instruments — 
things of that kind — that can never be 
manufactured in any part of the world as 
cheaply as in Pittsburg, unless it is in 
China. The Chinese have facilities that 
should make them master of the situation 
when it comes to the struggle for cheapness 
and the survival of the fittest. That-may yet 
be a long time, unless God in His providence 
should ordain otherwise. 

NUMBER OF MEN TO BE EMPLOYED. 

The number of men employed at Colling- 
wood would probably not be less than 
1,200, from that to 2,000 to commence 
work. But a great deal would have to 
depend on the grade of the finished ma- 
terial. It takes many more men to finish 
a ton of material in thin sheets than in 
heavy material such as bridges. A great 
deal also depends on how prosperous is the 
enterprise, how energetically it is pushed. 



If you require good 

VARNISHES 

for every class of work, why 
not purchase from the largest 
makers in Canada, 

THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 



Ample stocks of every de- 
scription of painting material 
at our factories and ware- 
houses in 

MONTREAL 

AND 

TORONTO 



THE 
CANADA 




COMPANY 
LIMITED 



Special 
attention to letter orders. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 




The Fairbanks Company 




THE CANADIAN AG^W^FOR C*^ 

The Rg^Aff]^ Co.'s 



y^ 



TOOLS 



SECTIONAL JAW PIPE VISE. 




ROLLER PIPE CUTTER- 




PIPE STOCK. 



The Fairbanks Company, 



749 

Craig 

Street, 



Montreal, Que. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



RELATION OF ADVERTISING TO THE COST 

OF GOODS.* 



By Walter H. 

ONE of our representatives a short 
time ago suggested that perhaps 
the recent change in price was 
made necessary by the large expenditure 
we are making in advertising and he made 
the suggestion that we give less advertising 
and a lower price. 

Now, good advertising, as I have tried to 
explain during this session, does not make 
goods more expensive. Good advertising 
will lower the cost of doing business, and 
if it does not do this it is not good advertis- 
ing. I want everybody to feel perfectly 
satisfied on this point. 

We are often thus accused of making our 
prices high on account of our advertising. 

The fact is, if we did not do so much ad- 
vertising and do it so well, our prices would 
have to be higher. 

To me, a proposition to increase advertis- 
ing expenditures, or, let us say, to do better 
advertising in order to lower prices, would 
be more practical than a proposition to do 
less advertising to accomplish the same 
object. 

Our advertising expenditure for the past 
year, while it was considerably larger in the 
aggregate, was materially lower in percen- 
tage to sales than it has been for many 
years past. Such results are what we aim 
to achieve in this department, and they are 
largely dependent upon the character of the 
advertising and tife care wit^Wiich it is 
put into effect. "^ ^^ ^^* 



COTTINGHAM. 

We watch the results in a very thorough 
and careful manner. Each division and 
every department is charged with the 
amount of the advertising, and the amount 
spent in this way is constantly compared 
with the sales. If. the sales warrant the 
expenditure it is all right, but if the results 
are not forthcoming, then there is something 
wrong. 

An advertising report is furnished by 
each division quarterly. It shows the cost 
of each different line of advertising for each 
line of goods. It shows the amount of ad- 
vertising used and the amount on hand, 
and it shows the total amount compared 
with the total sales. It takes a great deal 
of time and money to get up this report, 
but only in this way are we able to watch 
results and determine what is profitable and 
•what is not. 

This company are not going to throw away 
any money on advertising if they can help 
it. 

Our advertising has been a great help in 
building up this large business and it has 
enabled us to increase our output and give 
us as low a cost as we can expect. 



Take as an illustration a man who r 
doing a business of $100,000 pCKAnjum, 
and let us suppose his expenses are $25,01 
which is 25 per cent, to his sales. He 
wishes to increase this business and he de- 
cides to advertise. Let us suppose that he 
decides on an expenditure for this purpose 
of $7,500 per annum. His expenses are 
then increased to $32,500. By this expen- 
diture, let us suppose, he is able to increase 
his sales to $130,000 and at this rate his 
expenses with advertising added would 
amount to same percentage as before, 
namely, 25 per cent. He has not increased 
the percentage of his expense and has sold 
$30,000 more goods, and if his net profit 
was 5 per cent, he has increased his net 
earnings by $1,500. The amount I have 
named for advertising such a business 
should bring even larger results. 

What I want to make plain is that adver- 
tising well done does not increase expenses, 
but will lower them. That is the way we 
figure in our business. 



*Ponion of an address delivered by Managing Director 
Cotlingham at the recent convention of the representatives 
of the Sherwin-Williams Co at Cleveland. 




INQUIRIES REGARDING CANADIAN 
TRADE. 

The following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the High Commissioner's office, 
— Uj.London, England : 

German firm desirous of importing from 
, carriages, sporting goods, boat motors, 
etc. ; "SH^kinds of wood goods, office, and other 
furniture, Wys, etc., will be glad to hear from Cana- 
dian exporters op^a^o do business. 
^fe. Canadian firms desiring a representative in 
Scotlanff lean be fut'hefeed with the name of a 
gentlematf, in Glasgow \&fc^J'ishes to take up 
agencies. ' ^^ j ^^» 

[The names pk^tlie firms Shaking the 
above inquiries, can oe o CT ftned on applies) 
tion to the editor of H^RDWjN^^p MpflnSsj ' 
When asking for names, kindly give n/inflMi^ 
of paragraph and date of issue.] 1 * "Nw< 



Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
London, England, is in receipt of the 
following inquiries : 

1. A Glasgow house seeks supplies of Canadian 
oak staves for coopers' purposes and invite quota- 
tions. 

2. A house possessing a considerable connection 
in Australia and New Zealand in boots and shoes 
would like to hear from Canadian manufacturers 
who are in a position to compete with American 
goods in the Australasian market. 

3. A London timber house is prepared to under- 
take the agency of a first-class Canadian shipper 
of hardwoods. Old established connection. 

4. A firm of Sheffield cutlery manufacturers 
would like to hear from a first-class Canadian house 
which could take up the sale of their goods for 
Canada. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a wor u 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



FOR SALE. 



,; 



TINSMITH AND PLUMBING BUSINESS. 

1 for sale cheap. A splendid opening in a Nova 

Scotia town. Address, Jas. R. Gloster, Moncton, 

N. B. (5) 

A6ENT WANTED. 

\17E WANT TO APPOINT AN AGENT IN 
* " Canada to handle our well-known and re- 
liable Glaziers' Diamonds. Good connection with 
the paint and oil branch of the hardware trade 
necessary. A Shaw & Son, 52 Rahere Street, E.C., 
London, Eng. (5) 

SITUATION WANTED. 

A YOUNG MAN WITH BEST REFERENCES, 
for seven years connected with the hardware 
business, having a thorough knowledge of book- 
keeping, would like to make a change. A week's 
notice solicited. Box 41, Hardware and 
Metal, Toronto. (4) 

BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Firms desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best possible 
terms, or who are willing to become agents for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ilars of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 

"SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE, 1 

168 Fleet Street, London, England. 

"Commercial Intelligence" circulates all over 
the United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 



Book, Broom 

and 

Mattress Wire 



High Grade, Double Tinned. 






Fine Annealed Brush Wire 
Soft Coppered Wire 
Tinned Wire of all kinds. 



The Peerless Wire Co. 1 



Hamilton, Ont. 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE Au6 METAL^ ^ 



,n6 



/* 'rT^^hk' 



j^f^/^t 



Henry Rogers, 
Sons & Co. 

Wolverhampton, England 

(^Manufacturers of_^_^^^ 

"Union Jack" Galvanized Sheets 

Canada and Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Sleigh Shoes and Tyre Steel 

Coil Chain, Hoop Iron 

Sheet and Pig Lead 

Sheet Zinc 



Quotations can be had from 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., • MONTREAI 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



COOPERS 

ONE-PIECE ELBOWS. 

Scheipe's Patent Stove Pipe 

Best in the world. 




Ask for 

COOPER'S 

PATENT ELBOW. 

Price Guaranteed. 



E. T. WRIGHT <3c CO. 



Sole Owners. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



"JARDINE" 
HAND DRILLS 

Five different sizes to suit 
all requirements. It pays 
to sell the best tools. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



Gutter Hangers. 




The very best mide. Strong and easy to put up and adjust. By proper selection of the shank the requirements 
for any style eave will be met. Other kinds of Hangers, Pipe Hooks and Fasteners, Gutter and Pipe, and a general 

line of Tinners' and Roofers' Supplies. 



BBRGER BROS. CO., 



PHILADELPHIA, U.S.A. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, !5H5H53&S5L 



The Latest and Best 



H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 



Model 
1900. 




Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. 

Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 



IMIIIIIIIIIIIIIl 







ttHtHlkttttHHLLt*A*AAAmA*AAA*JLtmAAAi 



STEVENS TOOLS 




make a valuable line for those 
interested in such goods. 

lii ARANTKKii-By a company of :!7 years 
reputation. Fine Sellers — Liberally 
advertised throughout the country. Sold 
to the Trade— We desire to have our 
goods carried and represented by the 
trade, and refer all inquiries to them. 

This is our Angle Indicator No. 151. 
Price, Only $1 00. 

It is Accurate— no guess work about it. 

I isiSoi.in- not Himsy or a makeshift, but a 
real tool for every day use, under all con- 
ditions, wherever you need angles. 

Send for our complete Catalogue of Tools. 

We have a busines proposition fo' the trade. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 
P.O. Box 217. Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

New York office : 318 Broadway. 



>*»VT»»»*¥»W¥¥VT»¥V»»* 



HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 



DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Hand Laid Cotton Rope and Clothes Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, white and colored. Tennis and Fly Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, .Jute, Hemp and Flax Twines. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



QUEBEC BOARD OF TRADE. 

THE sixtieth annual meeting of the 
Quebec Board of Trade, which was 
held on Tuesday afternoon, January 
15, was attended by a large proportion of 
the prominent business men of the city, 
and proved to be one of the most successful 
meetings held for some time. 

The report of the treasurer, James Brodie, 
showed the finances of the board to be in a 
healthful, satisfactory condition. 

A communication was received from J. G. 
Scott, general - manager of the Canada 
Atlantic Railway, agreeing to place at the 
disposal of the Quebec Board of Trade a 
special train with sleepers, to leave Quebec 
and run through to Parry Sound at any date 
that may be convenient to the board after 
the opening of navigation in the spring. 

On motion of J. B. Garneau, seconded by 
W. H. Wiggs, a resolution was passed 
condemning the rule recently inaugurated 
in Her Majesty's Customs in Quebec, viz.: 
That of insisting that all invoices (without 
exception) have to be checked before the 
entry can be passed. It was pointed out 
that other cities, including Montreal, were 
not " saddled " with this new rule. A 
motion was, therefore, passed requesting 
the Customs authorities of this port to rescind 
this rule, and that invoices be checked 
as heretofore, and refund entries be made 
in event of any errors, the collector to re- 
serve the right to check the invoices of 
strangers. 

A. B. Van Felson reported to the meeting 
that while freight from Montreal was de- 
livered free in Three Rivers, that from 
Quebec was delivered at the expense of the 
receiver, notwithstanding the fact that the 
rate is the same and Montreal is five miles 
farther away than is Quebec. 

The report of the council dealt with 
freight and passenger service to Quebec ; 
the establishment of a Canadian Lloyds, 
with $5,000,000 capital, which will prob- 
ably have the affect of prolonging naviga- 
tion on the St. Lawrence ; the establishment 
of abattoirs throughout the Province ; the 
establishment of technical education in the 
Province ; the laying of the corner stone of 
the Quebec bridge ; the opening of the Great 
Northern Railway and its elevator, and the 
shipment of its first cargo of grain. Regard- 
ing bankruptcy, the council favors the enact- 
ment of a severe Act, uniform throughout 
the country, and has appointed a sub- 
committee which is now studying the matter 
in detail. 

With respect to winter navigation the 
report says : " The most important ques- 
tion of the winter navigation of the St. 
Lawrence is now more than ever on the 
tapis, owing to the requirements of the 
Western grain trade, and it is evident that 



we are nearing a favorable solution of the 
problem. The principal requirement is 
the replacing of the lightships and gas buoys 
by permanent lights, an improvement which, 
we understand, has already been carried 
out on the lakes." 

The following officers were elected for 
the ensuing year : 

President — George Tanguay, M.P. P. 

First Vice-President — John Ritchie. 

Second Vice-President — P. J. Bazin. 

Treasurer — D. J. Rattray. 

Council — V. Chateauvert, J. G. Garneau, Joseph 
Winfield, G. E. Amyot, V. Lemieux, R. H. Smith, 
Napoleon Drouin, M. Joseph, D. Arcand, Nazaire 
Lavoie, P. B. Dumoulin and O. Poitras, 

A vote of thanks was passed on motion of 
Messrs. Tanguay and Van Felson to the 
retiring president for his active interest in, 
and adequate efforts towards, the success of 
the Quebec Board of Trade during his term 
of office. 



BC.'S FIRST CONVERTER. 

A DESPATCH from Greenwood, 
B.C., says : " The announcement 
that the British Columbia Copper 
Co. has let a contract to the E. P. Allis Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis., for the immediate con- 
struction of a converting plant, is one of 
great importance, as this will be the first 
converter in the Province. That the com- 
pany should have placed the order before 
its smelter had turned out a pound of matte, 
leaves a little room to doubt the immense 
amount of confidence the directors place in 
the ability of Paul Johnson, the manager of 
the smelter department. He designed the 



local smelter, and most of the machinery is 
of his own invention. There now appears 
every probability that ere the installation of 
the bessemerising plant, the machinery for 
which is to be completed in three months, 
a second furnace will have been added to 
the reduction works, bringing the daily 
capacity up to 600 tons. 

" The contract calls for a blowing engine, 
40-ton electric crane, one stand of con- 
verters, crushing plant and accessories. Mr. 
H. V. Croll, manager of the Spokane 
branch of the E. P. Allis Co., stated that 
the cost would be in the neighborhood of 
540,000 at the works, and by the time it is 
installed there an additional 115,000 will 
have been added. It is to be capable of 
treating a daily output of 600 tons of ore, 
producing roughly 40 tons of matte. This 
amount passing through the converter 
means about 20 tons of blister copper, 
averaging 98^ to 99 per cent. The next 
step will be the making of electrolytic cop- 
per, and in time such a refining plant will 
be added. With the exception of the Butte 
smelters, none of the other Western reduc- 
tion plants have yet installed converters. 
The Northport smelter has a calcining 
plant to reduce the sulphur excess in the 
ores." 



Charles Pearson & Co., general mer- 
chants, Cedarhall, Que., have sold their 
stock at 75 X c - on trje dollar to J. B. E. 
Bergevin, Matane, Que., and their book 
debts at 52c. on the dollar to P. Z. Dube, 
Am qui. 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 
New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 
Black and Galvanized 
Plain and Painted 
Flat, Corrugated and 
"V" Crimped 

Apollo Best Bloom Galvanized 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Patent Planished Iron 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Refined Smooth Sheets 
Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



38 



U 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

^ Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
™ Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents: 



Drummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




We Manufacture^^ 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

A 1 ! our goods are guaranteed. 



James Warnock <& Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CURKEflT JVLAHKET QUOTATIONS 



January 25, 19)1. 
These prices ale for such qualities and 
'liian'ities as are usually o dered by retail 
dealers on the usual te ma of c edic, the 
lowest figures !>eiog for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash tuyere can fre- 
quently make pu rchases at better prices The 
Kditor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 32 33 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Per box 

10., usual sizes $7 00 

LX., " g 50 

I.X.X., " 10 00 

Famous— 

Jg- 7 50 

{•X .. 850 

I-X.X 9 50 

Ka7en & Vulture Grades— 

t.C, usual sizes 5 00 

I.X., " 6 00 

I.X.X " 7 OJ 

t.XXX., " g 00 

D.O., 12%xl7 4 75 

»X 5 50 

D.X.X 7 50 

Coke Plates— Brigit 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C. , usual sizes 4 15 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 5u 

20x28 8 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I.C, 20x28, 112 sheets 8 75 

I.X., Terne Tin 10 75 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
XX., 14x56, 50sheetbxs) 

" 14x60 " f- 07 07% 

•' 14x65, " J 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08% 

" 26 *' 08% 09 

28 " 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 165 170 

Refined " " 2 15 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 05 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 10 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base .... 2 00 

Tire Steel 2 00 

Machinery iron finish 2 05 

Cast Steel, per lb 00 00 

ToeOalk Steel 2 31 

T. Firth & Cos special cast steel, per lb. 13 

Jes lop's Tool Steel 13 

Boiler Tubes. 

I'/s-incb 21% 

tf '■ 13% 

^'« " 16 

3 " 17% 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

V< i eh 2 25 

3-lKiuch 2 2i 

^ i ich and thicker 2 25 

Black Sheets. 

18 gauge Sir) 

20 gauge 3 10 

22to24 " 3 20 

2« " 3 31 

28 " 3 40 

Canada Plate*. 

AH dull, 52 sheets 3 00 

Half polished 3 15 

AH 1. right 3 6) 3 75 



Iron Pipe. 

Black pipe— 

'i inch 3 00 

\ ■' 3 00 

% " 3 15 

% " 3 2d 

1 " 4 SI 

1% " 6 35 

1% " 7 55 

2 " 10 10 

2 1 2 -6inch, discount 6) p c. 

Galvanized pipe— 

V. iich 4 65 

% " 5 3) 

1 " 7 5 

1% " 9 75 

1% " 1125 

2 " 15 50 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16 gauge .... 45 4 CO 

18 to 24 gauge 4 25 3 85 4 35 4 25 
26 " 4 50 4 10 4 35 4 50 

28 " 4 75 4 35 4 50 4 75 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 
Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb 

% " 8 03 8 50 

5-16 " " 5 35 5 

% " " 4 35 4 85 

7-16 " " 4 15 4 65 

% " " 4 35 4 50 

" % " " 3 85 4 35 

% " " 3 89 00 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 4(1 and 50 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 25 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, di£- 

count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis. 
count 40 p.c • 

Copper. 

Ingot 

English B. S., ton lots 19 20 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cutlengthsround,%to%in. 23% 25 
' ' round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23% 25 
Sheet. 
Unturned, 14 oz., and light, 10 • 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 23 23 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note. — Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4x6f t. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25% 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " .... 23% 
Boiler and T. K. Pitts 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, perjlb 32 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2i4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb C6 06% 

Domestio " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5 cwt. casks 6 75 7 05 

Part casks 7 tO 7 51 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 04% 05 

Bar.llb 05% 05% 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by C6>4 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 



Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-'t. lengths listB at 7% cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1' lb ; chilled, $7. CO 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% p.c Prices are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized 
on Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 
Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 19 
B»r half-and-half, crurxerl .... 18'/, 

Refined 18% 

Wiping 18 

Note. — Prices of this graded according to 

quantity. The prices of other qualities of 

solder in the market indicated by private 

brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Per 100 lh. 

Pure 6 87% 

No. 1 do 6 50 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5 75 

No.4do 5 37% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 7 12% 

Brandram'sB B. Genuine 8 00 

" Decorative 7 55 

" No. 1 6 85 

" No. 2 6 00 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

PureWhiteZinc -. 08 C9 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 C6 l / 2 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities, per gallon 1 10 

Barn (in bbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 1 45 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

T, rontoLead& Odor Go's Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 
Colors in Oil . 
25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

ChromeYellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 03 

Colors, Dry. 
Yellow Ochre (J.O.) bbls.... 135 140 
Yellow Ochre (J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 1 10 1 15 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), per cwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt.. 1 75 2 00 
Canadian Oxides, per cwt.,. . 1 75 2 00 
Super Magnetic OxideB, 93p.c. 2 00 2 25 
Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 



Chrome Yellows, pure IS 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Dolden Ocbre 0. V„ 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 08 2) 

Kire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 1 00 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, per lb .... 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb 81 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Blue Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 18 

Putty. 

Bulk in bbls 2 00 

Bulk in less quantity 2 15 

Bladders in bbls 2 2D 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or lot se 2 35 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 45 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 75 

Bladders in luk oriios less than 1001b3 00 
Varnishes. 
In5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

" body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No. 1 160 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 360 

Demar 3 30 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 160 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8) 

" No. 1 1 60 2 00 



The Imperial 
Varnish & Color 
Co's., Limited 
Elastilite Varnish 
1 gal. can, each. 
$2.00. 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2.00. 

Maple Leaf 
Coach Enamels ; 
Size 1, fOc ; 
Size 2, 35c. ; Size 
3, 20c. each 




Linseed OH. 

i i: , v.x.i j, i- ^ Raw - Boiled. 

1 to 4 bbls delivered $0 82 $0 85 

5 to 9 bbls " 8i g4 

Toionto, Hamilton, London and Guelnh 
2c. Iks. 

Turpentine. 

Single barrel, freight allowed ... 59 

2 to 4 barrels " " g 53 

Castor Oil. 

East India, incases, per lb.. 10 10% 

" " small lots 10% Oil 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

Cod Oil per gal 50 55 

Pure Olive 120 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glue. 

Common .. 08% 0(9 

French Medal '4 1«% 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 1« 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 18 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Cloth 
om 
lour 



EMERY 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTOIM & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, Montreal. 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition • 

Cartridges. 
B. B. Caps. Dom. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. c, Amer. 
Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 
Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, lOp.o. Aroer. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 

30 per cent. 
Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 
Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 
Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
"Dominion" grides, 25 per cent Rival 
and Nitro, net list. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent 
Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-ib.bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5J0 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5 (0 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of l,0u0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 0.'25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 

each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and K gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 115 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 
Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Perlb 10 12% 

Anvil and Vise combined 4 50 

Wilkinson & Co.'s Anvils.. lb. 09 09% 
Wilkinson & Co.'s Vices.. lb. 09% 10 

Augers. 
Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, per doz 6 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy'sAxes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 
Baths. 
Standard Enameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 30 00 

" " 2nd " 22 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A perlb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

HYRACOSB SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

l>ynanio 29 

Special 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse".. 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 
Brass, GO per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 68% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent- 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 percent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, full square, Norway 70 

" " full square 70 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 65 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 65 

Coach Screws 73 

Sleigh 8hoe Bolts 75 

Blank Bolts 65 

Bolt Ends 65 

Nuts , square 4%c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 60 

Boot Calks . 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% percent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 165 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 10 

Bull Kings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Cast Iron. 
Looie Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast.Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per o nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

American, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, par gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraulic 125 150 



Chalk. 

Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket. Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnncb's, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns . 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8- 
No. 1, $8.5'i—' o. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4. $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, £8 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fittings ' 1 25 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 4 75 
Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout.... 5 25 

Fittings 1 55 

Low Down T-u'onic, plain 14 50 

" " - " embossed 15 00 

Plain Richelieu 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu 4 00 

Fittings 1 25 

L«w Dowa Ont. Syphon J't, plain. . 20 00 
" " " " " emb'd. 20 50 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round. 14 in 60 

" oval, 17x14 in 15') 

" 19x15 in 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62 x 4 to 65 per cent. 
Cradles. Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 

" 5, " 



.17% 
.22% 
.15 
.20 



Boynton pattern " 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz ..(15p.<\) 2 00 

Ooil.perdnz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wairon. dis 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 percent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis.. 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets 
Common, cork-lined, dis 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 40 

No. 2, per doz 1 20 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 p.c. to 60, 10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per oent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 



GLASS- 


-Win. 


low— Box Price. 




Star 


D. Diamond 


Size 


Per 


Per 


Per Per 


United 


50 ft. 


100 ft 


50 ft. 100 ft 


Inches. 










2110 


4 nn 


6 f0 


26 to 40 


2 30 


4 35 


6 65 


41 to 50 




4 75 


7 25 


51 to 60 




5 . 


8 50 


61 to 70 




5135 


9 25 


71 to 80 




5 7 5 


10 50 



81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86to90 14 00 

91to95 15 50 

99tol00 18 00 

GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each... 165 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % '• 900 

" %to 3 4 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, — per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb.... 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Fork. 
C. 4 B. , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. k B , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 73 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 4u percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%,10-ft. run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINHES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb. . . . 06% 

" " 5-in., " 06% 

" 6-in., " .... 16 
" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" " 10-in., " .... 05% 

Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pai s. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
' Cast Iron. * 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 1 10 * 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 
HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand 50 p.c. dis. I _ , . , 
"M" brand 50 p.c. f ° val head - 

Acadian, 50 and 10 per cent. 



fr&. 



ANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



MALEHAM & YEOMANS, 



Highest Award. 



Manufacturers of. 




Table Cutlery, Razors, 
Scissors, Butcher Knives 
and Steels, Palette and 
Putty Knives. 



SPECIALTY 



Exposition Uoiverselle, Paris, 1880. 



Cases of Carvers and 
Cabinets of Cutlery. 



SHEFFIELD, 

ENGLAND. 






Granted I780 



3 ^j^RAWt^ 

"W BRAD SHAW A. SON 



WHOLESALE ONLY. 



F. H. SCOTT, 360 Temple Building, MONTREAL. 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller 
Light, medium, and heavy. . 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz S 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per In 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door. japanned and N.P., per 

doz 150 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. 4 L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and in per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz 7 50 

No. 3 " Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined, 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized ... 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russell A Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 

English and Am., per doz 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flathead discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, per doz 8 50 1 00 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
Jberman, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMING?. 
Discount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 35 $3 S5 

3d 3 CO 3 52 

4and5d 2 75 3 35 

6 and 7d 2 65 3 20 

8and9d 2 50 3 00 

lOand 12d 2 45 2 95 

16and20d 2 40 2 9J 

30. 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 35 2 85 

Galvanizing 2c. per lb. netextra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 55 per cent 



NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per groBS 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 50 per cent, for McMullen's. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

(J. 8. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (US ) 16'/„ 

Prime White (U.S ) U 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can ) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 1 25 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 

PICKS. 
Per doz . , ; 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per sross.... 175 3 00 
Rrass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
o 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS 

Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 
Impression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 
Jenkins disk g'obe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 percent. 
Standard valves, discount, 60 per per cent. 
Jenkins radiator valves discount 55 per cent. 
' " " standard, dis, 60 p.c 

Quick opening values discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7. Fuller's 2 50 

No 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

100 lb. or less ; 85 

1,(01 lb. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 25 pe cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 1 00 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 1 00 

RANGE BOILERS. 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 6 50 ' 

35 " 7 50 

40 " 8 50 



Copper, 30 " 22 00 

r ' 35 " 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 

Cast steel and malleable Canadian list 

50 and 10 p.c revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 
New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler 4 Co.'s, 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile 4 Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, discount 60 md 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 60 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets 4 Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 

7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 9 13 

%in 10 14 

% and5-16in ]5 

Cotton, 3-16inch and larger 16% 

" 5-32inch 21% 

" % inch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope .. 10% 

RULKS. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 62% 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 67% 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper. 47% per cent. 
B & A. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. 4 D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft 35 55 

S. AD., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

■ frame only o 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 TO 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 
Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALES. 
B. S. 4 M. Scales, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
Dominion, 55 p.c. 
Richelieu, 55 p.c. 
Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 



SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., iron, and steel, 85 p. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 8") p.c 
F. H., brass, dia. 77% p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 70 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 70 p.c. 
" R.H. " 65 p.c. 

Drive Screws, 80 percent. 

Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

iron, " 4 25 5 75 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co , full nickeled, dis. 65 p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 450 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 325 340 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p c rev list 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p c 

STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. ,75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 00 

rlain 00 3 45 

Coopers', discouot 45 percent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 
STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

w^htt. STONE. Per lb, 

Was . h ' ta 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

T , . sh P' 09 09 

Labrador jj jS 

_ " Axe "."' ,c 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas n nn , Vk 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates cf 25 lengths. 
5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 mch " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4-3 dozen in case, net casn .... *4 8U 
-No. b— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk lll'io" 1 

Cheese-box tacks, blued '80 A 12V„ 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned . . 85 
Carpet tacks, blued ' 80 4 5 

!.' !! , t . lun , ed v •'■'•' •'•'•80 4 10 

(in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only ..75 & 15 

% weights 60 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

I n 5 ulk 80410 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk ..,'.'.'.'.85 4 12 1 /, 
' brush, blued 4 tinned, bulk.'.70 
gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 * in/ 

Zinc tacks St 

Leather oarpet t acks 55 

Copper tacks 59 

Copper nails 52 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF- 



OF ALL KINDS- 



ALEXANDER OIBB. n j- n *• A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Montreal ' -Canadian Representatives- Montreal 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. For other Provlnoes. 



Trunk nails, blacn So ana 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued and tinned 65 and 5 

Chair nail? 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tanks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " toUd heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tanks, papers 90 and 10 

" bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz ... 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

steel, each ... . 080 800 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson's per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, diB. 25 p c. 
Game, H. &N„ P. S. & W., 65 p.c. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.c. 



TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb.... 22 26 
Wrapping, mottled, pec pack. 5 J 60 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 20 

4-p'y 26 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES. 

Hand, per doz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 12 13 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2'/ 2 per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, $2.80 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nob. 2 to 5, ad- 



vance 7c. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9. base- 
No. 10, advance 7c.-No.ll, 14c— No. 12. 
20o.-No. 13. 35c.-No. 14. 47c— No 15, 
60c— No. 16, 75c. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c. 
— spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c — 
bagging or papering, 10c 
Fine Steel Wire, dis. 17% per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, «5-No. 18, $5.50- No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
$7.65 -No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
$9.50— No. 27, $10-No. 28 $11— No 29, 
$12-No. 30, $13— No.31.$14-No 32, $15 
No. 33, $16-No. 34. $17. ExtraB net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31, 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil- 
ing, 10c— in 25-Hi. bundles, 15c. —in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in '4-lb hanks. $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c — bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Galvanized Wire, perlOO lb.— Nos. 6, 7, 8,$3.*5 
No. 9, $3.10-No. 10, 33.75-No. 11. $3 85 
No. 12, $3.25— No. 13, $3.35-No. 14, 
$4.25-No. 15, $4.75-No. 16. $5.C0. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 

per 1,000 feet 3 30 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B. 
Galvanized 4 barb, 2V 4 and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 1" 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 97*/ 2 

in less than oarlots, and $2.85 in carlots. 

Terms, 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 
Ross braid truss cable 4 5U 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . 1 35 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c. off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37V, per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c 
Coe's Genuine, dis. fO to 25 p.c 

TowerB' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" 8., per doz 5 80 6 00 

O.tE'i Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz... 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $ 

Royal Canadian " 50 00 

Royal American " 50 00 

Discount, 45 per cent.: terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c. 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 and 5 per oent 



THE LONG EVENINGS OF WINTER ARE 
COMING— WHAT SORT OF LIGHT ARE YOU 
GOING TO USE? 

Greasy Candles, Smelly Oil Lamps, 
Poor Electricity or Flickering Gas? 



Isn't it about time to make 
a change and 

GET more Light 

For . . . 

Less Money ? 



Get 100 Candle 
Power 
for 50c. a month. 



No. I 




GET 

AN 



GET the Light of Eight Oil 

Lamps for the cost of Two. 

AUER GASOLINE LAMP. 

Your money bach if you don't like It. 



Write for Catalogue. 



AUER LIGHT CO. 

L!aS°«h. c riSSi". J *"'' I6J2 NOTRE DIME ST. MONTREAL 



Age 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



'RED THREAD'' Transmission Hope from 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 

the finest quality Manila 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 



■Limited 



Western Ontario Representative 
WM. B. STEWART, 



Tel 94. 



27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



SENE for specimen copy of Phillips' Monthl Machinery 
Register, containing over 5.000 entries of new and 
second-hand machinery of every description. The oldest 
established and most successful medium in the world. 
Established 25 years for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to tho t e who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per annum, all over the 
world, and is used for continual reference by a large number 
of firms. It is consequently a most valuable advertising 
medium for all engineers and manufacturers. Subscription , 
6s per annum, price per copy, 6d. Sole Proprietor, Chas. 
D. Phillips, M.IM.E.. Newport, Mon., England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mon.' 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clotbes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 




*0VlH> 10*0*1 <HfJr4, 

•'— . £,<rrv<rf-e&£<rur. 

VO YOtf? 

tidi/erlisemetitr 
«#• in the *r 



CONTACT'-* 

for^otf-ro 

- utltl bring you. 

tendcrs/rem th* 
b€Jft contractors 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PHESSlUPPIHE BUREAU, 

506 Board of Trade Bldg., MONTREAL, QUE. 

Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



73 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1823. 



73 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 




Tailors' Shears, 

Trimmers, Scissors, 

Tinners' Snips, etc. . CKrl0WLE00ED THE BEST . 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SIwa^n.?.^! \ 9 ° Chmmbt " st 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

CHAS. F. CLARK. President. JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849— 



r* 



Capital and Surplus, $1,600,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and vvorthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN. N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen. Man. Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A, FULTON, Gen. Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



Awarded a Gold Medal at 
PARIS EXPOSITION for 

superiority. That's proof 
enough of their quality, and 
clearly shows that they are 
the best. 



The Bailey 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 




Dominion Pattern 

Cow Tie * Stall Fixture 

The special features of the tie and stall fixture are well 
shown in the illustration. As will be noticed the chain is 
very short, which prevents all danger of entanglement with 
the animal's foot. At the same time the form of the fixture 
is such that great freedom is allowed to the head. Because 
of the short chain this tie is much cheaper than the ordin- 
ary patterns. 

The stall fixture is made from a tough quality of steel 
and is very strong. Also, owing to its circular cross-section, 
it is exceedingly rigid. Its simplicity, convenience, cheap- 
ness, and ease of attaching make it very popular with cow 
tie users. 

This form of tie and stall fixture are sometimes called 
Niagara pattern. 

American or Flat Link Chain, 

for years the standard cow tie chain in "the States, ' 
is now rapidly coming in favor in Canada. Its 
short link, handsome appearance and smooth sur- 
face — which cannot injure the animal's neck — make 
it superior to all other styles of chain for cow ties. 

For sale by all Jobbers ; manufactured by 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, 
ONT. 




Inc. 18»6 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 



: 




Awarded 
By JURORS « 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




1901 





[, 1901 



4/%.'%^%%^%^^%^%^^%^%^v%^%^%^%^%^%^%^%^''%^ 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Outta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
49-61-63 West Front St., 



TORONTO, C anada. 



Factories- I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Tin Plate 
Company, 

Battery Park Building, New York City. 

Manufacturers ,^*^d^- 

TIN PLATE 
TERNE PLATE 



and 



BLACK PLATE. 



B.SS. H.THOMPSON « COY 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 

Sole Agents for Dominion of Canada. 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 

Galvanized Corrugated sheets 

"BLACKWALL" BRAND 



'VWWWWWVWWX'W* ^/v****. 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



...Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Stands Comparison. 

LANGWELL'S BABBIT, Montreal. 



ec 







The Weekly Organ of the Hardware, Metal. Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, FEBRUARY 2, 1901. 



NO. 5 



'TIBET AHTI-FRICTIOH METAL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other for their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH a McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The latest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Address since the Fire : 
Rooms 509, 510 and 511 

Merchants Bank Building 

No damage to warehouse or interruption 
to business. 



gj^^U^c^^^ 



TO LEAK 



The Safford Radiators for Steam 
or Hot Water Heating have no 
joints, because the makers of the Radiators do not believe that it's 
the mission of a Radiator to leak. Joints require rods, bolts and 
packing, which are the promoters of leaks. 

The connections of the Safford Radiators are made by screw 
nipples which make them absolutely unleakable. And, too, the 
"Safford" is the original invention in screw nipples, hence, best by 
the longest test. Think of the money loss that leaky Radiators 
entail. Save that money and win the good-will of a customer by 
installing the "Safford," which is made by the largest Radiator 
Manufacturers under the British flag. Send for our free booklet 
telling all about it. 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited 

Toronto, Ont. 



PLUflBERS' 

AND 

STEAMFITTERS' 



TOOLS 



p VALVES 

| FITTINGS 

P TONGS 

E WRENCHES 



ALL 

KINDS 

OF 



PIPE 



STOCKS 



AND 



DIES 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



Limited. 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets, 

— ..,. TORONTO. 




n 



Meat & Food Chopper 



/is 
/is 

/is 
/is 

4 

4s 
/s 

/is 

/is 




u 



ENTERPRISE" 



No. 5, - $2.00 

» » ii'ti"** ?K 

Rapid Grinding & vf/ 

Pulverizing Mills SJj 

S 

$ 

I 



No. 2H, - S4-.50 * 
Fruit, Wine & Jelly Press <fe 




patented 
Hardware Specialties 

Comprising ^*r-\ 

Meat and Food Choppers, 35 sizes aud styles for hand 
and power; Rapid Grinding and Pulverizing Mills, 32 
sizes and styles for hand and power; Fruit, Wine and 
Jelly Presses; Meat Juice Extractors; Cherry Stoners; 
Raisin Seeders, for hand and power; Ice Shredders; 
Vegetable Slicers; Mrs. Potts' Cold Handle Irons; 
Sausage Stuffers and Lard Presses, etc., etc. 

ARE THE BEST 



Write for Descriptive 

Catalogue 



Sold by the Leading Jobbers of the Dominion 



The Enterprise Mg. Co. of Pa. 



Philadelphia, Pa., V. S. A. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Garden Hose 




Discounts for the new season 
now out. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 

CANADIAN RUBBER CO., 



/Montreal. 



Toronto. 



Winnipeg. 



t 



THE NEW BALDWIN j 

DRY AIR CLEANABLE \* ^ 

REFRIGERATOR. I 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. * 

BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation- 
Sanitary — Odorless. 
Latest Cleanable Fea- 
tures—The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Looks 
Bali-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Rubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 




Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the Eas 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; specia 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., I 



i 



BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



f 






SOME OF THE HEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




NO. 41 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN HANDLE. 




NO. 42 AUTOMATIC DRILL WITH DRILL POINTS IN BOX. 




NO. 50 RECIPROCATING DRILL, FOR WOOD OR METALS 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO, 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SPOUTS 



"EUREKA " 




^\ 



THE "EUREKA") „„.„,„ (?r" , ^" ,dD Z , ?\ 

f Because i Safe and Secure— No Leakage 
Steel Sap Spouts C are \ Easily inserted, does not injure the tree 

Are Ever Popular J \ Secure Full Flow of Sap 



"IMPERIAL 



9* The "IMPERIAL" is made of 
Heavy Tinned Steel, neatly 
retinned. Specially adapted 
for covered Sap Buckets. 



ALL PACKED IN CARDBOARD BOXES, 100 EACH. 

Berlin Bronze, made in 22 and 24 gauge. Tinned Steel, made in 20 gauge. 

PRICES ON APPLICATION. 

The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL. 



GALVANIZED SHEETS 

" Gordon Crown" Brand 

From stock or importation. Enquiries Solicited 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington Street West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SKATES 



STARR MFG. COS 

standard lines of 
Acme and Hockey Skates 



also UNION HARDWARE CO'S Hockey- 



Toronto Office: 

32 Front St.,West 

H. T. Eager. 



mm 




Branch House: 

George D. Wood 
& Co., 

Winnipeg. 



LADIES' SKATE WITH LEATHER ANKLE SUPPORT. 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



~^> 



Wood, Vallance & Co., - Hamilton 

"PLYMOUTH" TWINE 



VVVVVVVVVVVWA/VW^WV 



I THE STAMP OF 
EXCELLENCE. 

*♦ 'vwvwwwwwvwwv 



and some of its selling advantages: 

Every farmer knows it. 

Everybody likes it. 

More farmers use it than 
any other Binder Twine. 

" Plymouth" is sold at prices that are right. 

It is celebrated for its great length, strength, evenness, 
and is always absolutely reliable. 

There is a certainty about "Plymouth." 




Plymouth Binder Twine Agency, McKinnon Bldg., flelinda St., Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Our 





KFOR 



Represents the very highest development attained in 

range construction. 

Its patented improved features give it precedence over 
all others — and the improvements need only to be seen to ba 
appreciated. 

ITS FRONT DRAW-OUT GRATE 
DIFFUSIVE FLUE CONSTRUCTION 
OVEN THERMOMETER 
DRAW-OUT OVEN RACK 

and handsome appearance are "talking points" that 
sell it everywhere. 

Are you handling them ? 

If not, write for our catalogue and price list — 
they are leading favorites all over Canada. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 



TORONTO. WINNIPEG. 




VANCOUVER. 
THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



David Maxwell & Sons 




ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 

" Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, 
and Detachable Driving Link Improved f.or sea- 
son of igoi. Steel or Wood Fr p me as desired 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different 
Sizes. 



Steel Frame 



maxwell mower 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



High and Low Wheels, 
from 12-in. to ao-in. 
widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Knives and Cutting 

Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you 
these articles 



...SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



yfjUi/tui£ac&L}6l*(. 



OUNDAS AXES 



ARE- 



American in Sharpness, 
Canadian in Reliability, 

JUST WHAT YOU WANT TO SELL. 



Dundas Axe Works 

DUNDAS, ONT. 

MONEY 
IN IT!! 



few 



1 CrjsUIliB Soilu] Will PilisL 



C?W',S?tSf"' 



THE MURALO COflPANV. 



SEE THAT PACKAGE? 

There's money in it if you want it. It holds the 
finest, the purest, the healthiest, most thoroughly 
up-to-date cold water 

WALL FINISH 

in the world. That's what 

4 ' MURALO" 

is, and it's backed up by one of the strongest finan- 
cial institutions in America, and it makes money 
all the world over to-day. Want to hear about it ? 



Write to- 



A. RAMSAY & SON, MONTREAL. 

J. H, ASHDOWN, WINNIPEG. 

McLENNAN, McFEELY & CO., - - VANCOUVER. 
AGENTS. 




VanTujl & foiftenk 

Petrolia,\Ojit. 

Headquarters for . . . **, 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps, CasingvTuJbing, 
Fittings. Drilling Tools, 
Cables, etc. 
i 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 
PARIS 
ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 




"DAISY" CHURN oe 

Has tempered steel cased bicycle ball bearings, strongest, neat- 
est and m|rfj convenient frame. Only two bolts to adjust in 
setting up. 'Steel Bow Levers, suitable for either a standing or 
sitting postufe. Has -four wheels and adjustable feet to hold 
stand steady whiJi churning When churn is locked to stand 
the bow can be usefl as handles to move it about on the front 
wheels as handy SSfu baby carriage. Open on both sidts to 
centre, giving free Sp^ce,for pail. Made with wood or steel 
stands, with Cranks onty^pr Bow Levers as desired. 

Vollmar Perfect Washer 

Has a most enviable record. A 
perfection of its kind— will wash 
more clothes in less time, do it better 
and easier, with less wear and tear, 
than any other machine. ■ 



THE. 



Worta 4 Ward Mfg. Co., 




Limited 
LONDON, ONT, 

Eastern Branch, 60 McGill Street, Montreal, Que 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., limited 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 




Lang's Patent Wire 

Rope for 

Colliery and Mining 

Use. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

Wire Rope 

of every description and 
for all purposes. 






HARDWARE DEALERS 

And merchants in any line will have solved the problem of Success in Business, if, when they buy goods for their 
stock in store, consideration is given to articles that have a record of value, and are in demand by the people. 

Firmness on the pirt of a dealer in buying only goods of this character will absolutely prevent the accumulation of 
dead stock, and by investing in goods that are constantly on the move, because they are in demand stocks 
are always fresh and clean. 

For more than a quarter of a century CHURCH'S 

ALABASTINE 

manufactured ready for use by mixing with cold water, has been before the people; advertised extensivelv 
and in general demand. oi.u 1Jr , 

ALABASTINE is the recognized standard wall-coating in England and America. Is manufactured in Canada 
patented in this and other countries. 

Dealers are sometimes induced to try something eise on representation that " it is thej>ame thins " or " iust as 
good forgetting for the time being that there is but one CHURCH'S ALABASTINE, and with the result that thev 
have dead stocks to remain on the shelves for an indefinite length of time. 

Our supply of advertising matter is complete and attractive, and, through our special system of distrib 'tion the 
peoplearemadeacquamted with the merits of ALABASTINE, and its superiority over anything else for the purpose. 

CHURCH S ALABASTINE is put up in packages. Never sold in bulk. Buy only the genuine. 

The attention of Contractors, Builders and Building Owners is called to our 
PARISTONE Wall Plaster and SHIELD BRAND Calcined Plaster. 

None Better. 



Address, THE ALABASTINE CO., LIMITED, Paris, Ont. 



The trade supplied by — 

Sanderson Pearcy & Co., Toronto, Ont. 
G. F. Stephens & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 



Vancouver Hardware Co , Vancouver, B.C. 
Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
William Hill, Montreal, P.Q. 



CANADIAN H^KDWkRE AND METAL 




LARGE SIZE 




STANDARD SIZE 



No. 10 JAPANNED 



No. 5-ROVAL BRONZE 
STANDARD SIZE 



"spring hinges 




No. 20— JAPANNED 
No. 120— OLD COPPER 

STANDARD SIZE 




Manufactured by 



A J. 




&C0. -< 



No. 50 JAPANNED 



6UELPH, CANADA. 

Sold by every Wholesale House. 




SUGAR 




ERS'S 



DD 



+S 




Sap Buckets. 




Extra deep and straight. Three sizes. They possess many 
advantages over the Ordinary Flaring Buckets — being small 
in diameter they do not catch the rain or snow, and, as they 
are very deep, they hang perpendicularly, and, consequently, 
will not overflow until full. Covers supplied if required. They 
nest close for shipping or storing. 

We can supply the Ordinary Flaring Sap Fails. 

E. T. Sap Spouts. 

Made of Retinned Steel. Strong and Durable. Only re- 
quire a J^-in. hole in a tree. It does not cover the inside sur- 
face of the hole, therefore, a larger amount of Sap is obtained. 

Maple Leaf Sap Spouts. 

Made in Bronzed Steel. Require a J^-in. hole. Has a 
shoulder which prevents it being driven in too far. The hole 
in the tree is not exposed to wind and snow, consequently, 
sap will flow longer. 




Sprup Cans. 



X OT|£C 



Plain or Decorated. Made in y t , % and i gallon sizes. 
Either Wine or Imperial Measure. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., ^c ,"*,; 



Canada. 




VOL XIII. MONTREAL AND TORONTO, FEBRUARY 2, 1901. NO. 5. 

President, ers have begun to consider the question AN OPPORTUNITY TO PLAN. 
JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. in relation to themselves. ' I 'HE time of the year when trade is 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. Somewhat more than a year ago several slack is the season that tests the 

Limited. of the retail merchants of Sussex, N.B., quality of a merchant's or a clerk's 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- joined forces under the style of The Sussex energy or progressive spirit. The "dull 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 

North-west Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, Mercantile Co. That thev have been days " show that altogether too many clerks 

Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. ' 

island and Newfoundland. satisfied with their experiment is evidenced and merchants are lacking in the true 

offices b the f that f months ago they ab- elements of progressiveness. The business 

MONTREAL 231 McGill Street, J b 1 

Toronto 10 Front 1 itr 1 e e n t e E I ast; sorbed tw0 oth er concerns in the place. man who is bound to make the best of the 

London, eng. . - - - tog Vtofi&Z£%& Several amalgamations have been reported seasons of activit y and rush is the one who 

Manchester, eng. - - - 18 k An "aire*: from British Columbia lately. One of the finds in the slack season not a necessity to 

H. S. Ashburner. , ... . ,, . , . 

Winnipeg .... Western Canada Block, most recent is the consolidation of the busi- "kill time, but rather an opportunity to 

J. J. Roberts. . 

ST. john, n.b. - - - N0.3 Market Whan. n ess of The Russell Hardware Co., W. M. P lan means of improving his stock, his 

|. Hunter White, 

new york. 176 E. 88th street, Law & C o., general merchants, and Caul- store methods, the store itself, his advertis- 

Traveiiing subscription Agents: field Lam on, hardware dealers, Green- in S. and to study the business he is 

T. Donaghy. r. 0. Millard. ' 

wnnA R r ,,nHnr rh#» ctvi<» n( The Rn^*»il engaged in, the local conditions that have 

Subscription. Canada and the United States, $2.00. WOOd, U.C., under ttie Style Ot Itte KUSSdl- && 

Great Britain and elsewhere - - ■ i2s. Law . Cau lfield Co., Limited. The new t0 be recognized in order to be most satis- 

Pubiished eve^aturda^^ ^^ ^ ^ .^^^ with an factorily dealt with, and the characteristics of 

cable Address { £££$■. Canada'. authorized capital of $ioo,ooo. his hel P that he mav be enabled to make 

_, . . . , the most of their services. There is no 

There seems to be sound economy at the 

, , r . ... .. ., Ti limit to the directions in which a merchant 

bottom of such consolidations as these. It 

.,., ^ ., , ■ , may direct his thoughts during a slack 
is unquestionable that the business house 

.... a. . „ x „ . ' „ , „ ., season. And thought, well directed, has a 
which has sufficient capital to take all its 

,. . , . , „ value equivalent to that of the hardest 

discounts is at a big advantage over all n 

- . ccmpetitors unable to do so. Not only in " y 

RETAIL STORE AMALGAMATIONS. this respect, but in the saving of floor space, 

OPEN PRICES ON HORSESHOE 

THE spirit of consolidation seems to be shelf room, bookkeeping, etc., affected by NAILS. 

gradually reaching into and perme- this means < there U an advantage which The Canadian Horseshoe Nail Associa- 

ating every branch of industry and makes h reasonable to expect many such Uon was dissolved on January 1, and during 

commercial activity. amalgamations as those mentioned above. this month open prices have preva .iled on 

The discussion of the "Trust" question horseshoe nails. 

.. . ., .. ■ a , ., AN INFLUENCE ON PROFITS. A „ , , ,. , . 

— the question whether the influence of the As a result of the dissolution prices have 

great combinations of capital in recent years A merchant cannot afford to be on bad been reduced this week, the discount being 

is likely to be good or bad, has waged long terms with his competitors any more than SOt IO and - 5 per cent- on ova i head, and 

and waxed warm. The only apparent ne can with his customers, jo IO an( j IO p er cen t. n countersunk 

result has been to increase the tendency Customers are the only ones likely to head horse nails. 

toward amalgamation. gain from the flow of bad blood between It seems that the break-away was made 

Practically, the last department of trade merchants, and what the former gain the by concerns wishing a wider scope in which 

to be affected by the movement is the retail la tter lose. to do business. 

business in the various lines. But evi- The better the terms on which merchants A meeting is to be held in the first week 

dences are accumulating that the retail- live the better the profits they earn. in February, but reorganization is uncertain. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 



THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS 



MEN IN PARLIAMENT SHOULD 
ORGANIZE. 



THAT the Parliament of Canada should 
be conducted on business principles 
is now a recognized truism. It was 
not always so, for, by implication at any 
rate, it was generally held that the applica- 
tion of business principles to Parliamentary 
affairs was incompatible, and that those 
who held to the contrary were dreamers 
and faddists. Now, even the professional 
politician subscribes to the doctrine though, 
through ignorance or design, he seldom 
practices it. 

But, while the belief in the soundness of 
the doctrine that business methods should 
be applied to Parliamentary practice is so 
general that no one probably would gainsay 
it, each session of the House forcibly re- 
minds one that the leaven of business 
influence there is still very small. 

The fact of the matter is that, while there 
are a good many business men in the 
House, and in theory business practice is 
a good thing and a necessary thing, the 
business men therein are practically without 
influence. And they are not lacking in 
influence because they are not numerous 
enough. There are over 80 business men 
in the House, or something like 37 per cent, 
of the total membership. The relatively 
small influence of the business men is not, 
therefore, due to lack of numbers. Nor is 
it due to the want of ability. The most 
useful members of the House are business 
men. It is due to lack of organization. 

Hardware and Metal is not an advo- 
cate of a third party, whether it be 
business men or any other class of men. 
Organization of the business men in Parlia- 
ment does not mean obliteration of party 
lines any more than adherence to party 
principles means the renunciation of 
religious beliefs. 

A man can be a Liberal or a Con- 
servative and at the same time be a Roman 
Catholic or a Protestant. 

The business men who are members of 
the House of Commons could in like 
manner have an organization of their own 
and yet at the same time still be associated 
with one or other of the two great political 
parties. 

The representatives from the different 



Provinces hold their occasional conclaves. 
So sometimes do those of various religious 
beliefs. Why then should not business 
men ? There is no reason why they should 
not. But there is every reason why they 
should. 

As we have already intimated, the appli- 
cation of business methods to Parliamentary 
practice is essential to the successful con- 
duct of the latter. No one will dispute 
that. It follows, therefore, that the more 
the business men in Parliament are working 
in unison on business questions the nearer 
is it possible to get to the ideal. 

Supposing, for instance, the eighty- odd 
business men in the House were to get 
together and express themselves in favor of 
the much-desired insolvency law, does any- 
one for one moment imagine the Govern- 
ment would any longer defer introducing 
such a measure ? 

The Government is perfectly aware that 
the commercial exigencies of the country 
demand it, but it fears, as previous Admin- 
istrations have feared, the political exig- 
encies that the introduction of an insolvency 
bill might create. 

Assured of the support of the business 
element, the Government would not be long 
in developing action in regard to this or any 
other question affecting the commercial 
interests of the country. 

It should not be a difficult thing for the 
business men of the House of Commons to 
organize. There would be no tenets, 
either political or religious, to which they 
need subscribe. All that would be neces- 
sary would be to call a meeting, appoint a 
chairman and a secretary, and gather to- 
gether again when it was necessary to con- 
sider, from a practical business standpoint, 
such Bills before the House as directly or 
indirectly affected the commercial interests 
of the country or to discuss measures of 
that character which it was thought wise 
should be brought forward. 

Party exigencies would possibly prevent 
such an organization taking a united stand 
on every question of a commercial nature, 
but that is not an argument against its 
existence. On the contrary it is an argu- 
ment for, rather than against, for it shows 



the necessity of controlling the party spirit 
when it conflicts with the commercial wel- 
fare of the country. And the longer such 
an organization existed the more potent 
would its influence become in regulating 
the action of Parliament. 






Long before barb wire was used in actual 
warfare, it was the subject for warfare 
among manufacturers and dealers. 



HEAVY PURCHASE OF PIG IRON. 

A GREAT deal of interest is being 
taken in a large purchase of Besse- 
mer pig iron by The Carnegie Steel 
Company. The quantity concerned is 
150,000 tons. 

The Carnegie Steel Company is already 
a large producer of pig iron. It has no less 
than 17 furnaces, and, with others that it is 
building, will have the facilities for making 
2,700,000 tons of pig iron per annum. 

But, in spite of its capacity for making 
pig iron, its capacity for making steel is 
greater ; hence, in order to supply its steel 
plant, it is necessary to go into the open 
market. It is estimated that at present the 
Carnegie Company uses 900,000 tons of pig 
iron per annum in excess of what it 
produces. 

Besides the purchases of Bessemer pig 
iron by the Carnegie interests, good quan- 
tities have been bought during the past 
month by The American Steel and Wire 
Company and other concerns. 

As stocks of Bessemer pig iron have been 
decreasing for some time, the recent heavy 
purchases have given strength to the 
market, and some of the Valley furnaces 
have advanced their prices to $13, an 
appreciation of 50c. per ton. The price at 
which the sales were made to the Carnegie 
and other interests was $12.50 per ton. 
With ore costing the furnace $6. ic 
delivered, coke $1.75 to $2, and limestone 
and wages high, it is doubted by some 
authorities in the United States that the* 
furnaces can make and sell pig iron at 
$12. 50 per ton and earn a profit. 



The United States Tinplate Trust has 
bought out another rival. It evidently has 
the "tin." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



9 



UNITED STATES PIG IRON PRODUCTION FOR 1900. 

THE American Iron and Steel Associa- 68,309 tons on December 31, 1899, and 342,- 

tion has received from the manu- 907 tons on June 30, 1900. The total stocks 

facturers complete statistics of the in the above-named warrant yards on 

production of all kinds of pig iron in the December 31, 1900, amounted to 16,400 

United States, in 1900 ; also complete tons, against 4,900 tons on December 31, 

statistics of the stocks of pig iron which 1899, and 5,800 tons on June 30, 1900. 

* were on hand and for sale on December Furnaces.— The whole number of furaaces 

31, 1900. i n blast on December 31, 1900, was 232, 

Production. — The total production of pig against 289 on December 31, 1899, and 

iron in 1900 was 13,789.242 gross tons, 283 on June 30, 1900. 

against 13,620,703 tons in 1899, 11. 773,- Production of all kinds of pig iron from 

934 tons in 1898 and 9 652,680 tons in l8o7 t0 I900 by States . 

1897. The production in 1900 was 168,539 , Gross tons of 2,210 pounds 

tons greater than in 1899. The following . JSSSSmmM 'Jfo % ^ Tsfo 

table gives the half-yearly production of $™42g\ = «!$« 2 £™ $™ #jg 

Dip iron in the last four vears New Jersey 95 > 69<! m < 6il 127 ' 598 170 - 2S2 

pig iron hi uic idM iuux years. Pennsylvania ... . 4,631,634 5,537,832 6,55«,878 6,365,935 

D . , „ Maryland 193,702 191,974 234,(77 291,073 

Periods— 1897. 1898. 1899. 1900 Virginia 307,610 283,274 365,491 490,617 

First half ... . 4,403,476 5,869,703 6,289,167 7.642,569 NorihCarolinaand 

Second half.. 5,249,204 5,904,231 7.33 I >53° 6,146,673 Georgia 17,092 13,762 17.835 28,984 

Alabama 947,831 1,033,676 1,083 905 1,184.337 

Total ... 9,652,680 11,773,934 13,620,703 13789,242 Texas 6,175 5,178 5,t03 10,150 

West Virginia 132,907 192/99 187,858 166,768 

The production of pig iron in the second Kentucky 35,899 100,724 119,019 7i,5<!2 

r r ° Tennessee 272,130 263,489 346,166 362,190 

half of 1899 and the first half of 1900 aggre- Ohio 1,372,889 1,986,3)8 2,378,212 2,470,911 

y aa Illinois 1,117,239 1,365,898 1.442,012 1,363,383 

gated 14071,101; tons, or almost ic.ooo.- Michigan 132,578 147,640 134,443 i63,m 

B ^ '*' 3 3 Wisconsin and 

OOO tons. Minnesota 103,909 172,781 203,175 184,791 

*Missouriand Col- 

It will be observed that there was a de- orado 30 ' m J^ x »' m ™ m 

cline in production in the second half of jrotai 9,052,680 11,773,934 13,620,703 13,71,9,212 

I90O, as compared with the first half, of *Missouri, 23,883 tons ; Colorado, 6,583 tons. 

1,495,896 tons. 

_,. , .. , D GERMANY'S PIG IRON PRODUCTION 

The production of Bessemer pig iron in 

1900 was 7,943,452 tons, against 8,202,778 Germany's pig iron output for 1900 was 

tons in 1899. 8,422,842 tons, an increase of 393,537 tons 

The production of basic pig iron in 1900, for the P recedin g y ear - The December 

all made with coke or mixed anthracite and out P ut was 7 20,790 tons. 

coke, was 1,072,376 tons, against 0815,033 

: ' 8 y 5 J AUTOMOBILES IN THE POSTAL 

tons in 1899. SERVICE. 

The production of spiegeleisen and ferro- . , .. . it . , 

r ° An exchange states that the postal 

manganese in 1900 was 255 ,977 tons, ., - t . . ,, TT -^ , . . 

b y 3? ?" > authorities in the United States are con- 

against 219,768 tons in 1899. ... . , , . , , .. 

" sidering a project for making local mail 

The production of charcoal pig iron in co n e ctions by automobiles. 

1900 was 339.874 tons, against 284,766 For some time automobiles have been in 

tons in 1899. use j n Berlin for this purpose, while in 

Unsold Stocks.— Our statistics of unsold Toronto the local collections and the con- 
stocks do not include pig iron sold and not veying the mails to and from the railway 
removed from the furnace bank, or pig iron station have been done by the horseless 
in the hands of creditors, or pig iron manu- carriage. 

factured by rolling mill owners for their own The United states is evidently a little 

use, or pig iron in the hands of consumers. behind Berlin and Toront o in the utilization 

The stocks which were unsold in the hands of the au . omo bi:e in the postal seivice. 

of manufacturers or their agents on Decern- 

ber 31, 1900, amounted to 442,37° tons, GLASS DEARER IN THE UNITED 

against 63,429 tons on December 31, 1899, STATES. 

and 338,053 tons on June 30, 1900. On Thursday last week contracts were 

Included in the stocks of unsold pig iron signed by the National Window Glass 

«) on hand on December 31, 1900, were 12,- Jobbers' Association of the United States 

750 tons in the yards of The American Pig for 700,000 boxes at an advance of 30 per 

Iron Storage Warrant Co. which were yet cent, over former quotations. The cause 

under the control of the makers, the part in of the advance is reported to be chat, while 

these yards not under their control amount- in past years the American Window G ass 

ing to 3.650 tons, which quantity, added to Co. and the independent companies have 

the 442,370 tons above mentioned, makes a been *' at war " and prices were kept down 

total of 446,020 tons which were on the by the keenness of competition, this year 

market at that date, against a similar total of an understanding has been reached whereby 



prices have been raised and contracts 
divided in proportion to capacity. A further 
advance is anticipated. 

This rise in prices in the United States 
will not affect the Canadian market. 



ANOTHER DROP IN SCREWS. 

For the second time since the beginning 
of the year, a decline is to be reported in 
the price of wood screws. The cause of 
these declines is American competition. 

The discounts are now as follows : Flat 
head bright, 87^ and 10 per cent, off list; 
round head bright, 82 j£ and 10 per cent.; 
flat head brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round 
head brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 



FORT WILLIAM BOARD OF TRADE. 

THE annual report of President Morton 
and the election of officers of the Fort 
William, Ont, Board of Trade, were 
the features of the annual meeting on Mon- 
day evening last week. 

The report showed that since the organi- 
zation of the board, ten years ago, Fort 
William has grown in population from 750 
to about 5,000 ; that a town hall and town 
public schools have been erected at a cost 
of $50,000 which would be a credit to any 
city; a first-class system of waterworks and 
electric lighting have been installed, and that 
there has been a steady improvement in 
every respect. 

During the past year the Standard Oil 
Co. have established in Fort William a 
branch from which they intend to supply the 
Canadian Northwest ; the C.P.R. have ma- 
terially increased their dockage and round- 
house facilities. Arpin, Scott & Finger have 
decided to locate large saw and planing 
mills in Fort William. It is likely the 
American Steel and Wire Co. will build iron 
ore docks and establish offices there. 

The report concluded by suggesting that 
a strong effort be made to have a quarantine 
station established by the Dominion Gov- 
ernment at Fort William. 

The following officers were elected for 
1901 : 

President — E. A. Morton, reelected. 

Vice-President — C. W. Jarvis. 

Secretary-Treasurer — E. R. Wayland. 

Council — W. F. Hogarth, A. McDougTll, E. S. 
Rutledge, S. C. Young, J. H. Perry, J. J. Wells, 
John King, Alex. Snelgrove, W. L. Morton, Don 
McKellar, W. H. Whalen, James Murphy. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. John J, Drummond, managing- 
director of the Midland Iron Furnace was 
in Toronto last week. 

Mr. A. O. Campbell, of the Vancouver 
Hardware Co., and Mr. Fred. Buscombe, 
crockery and fancy goods dealer, Van- 
couver, have left for a three months' tour 
of the manufacturing and trade centres of 
Eastern Canada, the United States, Great 
Britain and continental Europe. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CREDIT- 



-WHO TO EXTEND IT TO AND FOR 
HOW LONG* 



BY HERBERT F. HALEY. 



ft 



c 



IREDI T— who to extend it to and 
for how long" is the bane of 
every merchant's successful 
existence; to extend credit to the worthy, 
who will show their appreciation of the favor 
by paying their bills promptly when they 
fall due, is a question which must be 
handled with every discretion and abso- 
lutely without sentiment. 

THE BASIS OF CREDIT. 

This worthiness and ability must be 
thoroughly determined as to time and 
amount before a single dollar's worth of 
goods are charged, and to allow the 
maxim "A credit well made is an account 
half collected " to always confront us. 

In determining this credit, we must first 
consider the moral responsibility of our 
prospective customer, as well as his ability 
to pay ; also how he has been paying our 
fellow-merchants. 

DRAWING THE LINE. 

No matter how good rating, this same 
customer has misfortunes, and to draw the 
lines at the proper time — good and strong 
— is the hardest proposition with which we 
have to deal. 

Yet, if we do not draw them promptly, 
we invariably regret our inaction, and the 
result is a balance that is not only hard for 
us to carry out, but one which is too often 
left unpaid. 

Human nature is sympathetic, and our 
former good customer expects us to share 
his misfortunes to the fullest. 

AN INJURY TO BOTH. 

In extending too much credit to a cus- 
tomer, we not only injure ourselves, but our 
customer as well. We lead him to extrava- 
gant living, buying goods that perhaps he 
would not have bought otherwise, soon 
becoming careless in his payments. Mis- 
fortunes of some kind overtake him, or, 
equally as bad, he decides to buy a home 
on the installment plan, uses our money to 
make the first payment, invests our money 
for us, but always in his wife's name. 

The only way to avoid this is to 

EXACT PROMPT PAYMENTS, 

and in full, the day they are due ; and, 
when extensions are given, make the time 
short, and see that the agreement is carried 
out to the letter. 

The old saying, "That will be all right," 
is the most dangerous one that a merchant 
can use ; it seems to mean at the time only 
a common courtesy, but later it means that 

* Paper read before the Retail Grocers' Association, 
Chattanooga, 



if we have not the money coming from our 
" prompt payers," we will have to ask 
these same extensions from our creditors, 
which, if granted, are unpleasant, to say 
the least. . 

THINGS TO CONSIDER. 

Often were we to consider in granting 
credit that we are iisking, say, 80 percent, 
of hard cash for a prospective 20 per cent, 
gain ; and often, after our expenses are 
deducted from this 20 per cent., we have a 
net of, say, 8 per cent., or, in other words, 
we have risked 80 per cent, for a possible 
8 per cent. — a ratio of 10 to 1, which cer- 
tainly behooves us to make " caution " our 
ever watchword. 

Credit and collections are so closely 
entwined that one cannot survive without 
the other. " Take care of the collections, 
and the credits will take care of them- 
selves." is a very broad assertion, but one, 
which, if simmered down, contains a great 
deal ot logic. 

Many a good customer has been allowed 
to become careless in his payments on 
account of not being promptly and properly 
seen. 

CREDIT AND BOOKKEEPING. 

are also very closely linked. To success- 
fully handle an account, you must know its 
standing at all times ; to do this your books 
must be kept up to the minute, thus enabl- 
ing you to quickly use tact and discretion in 
saying "Yes" or "No" at the proper 
time. 

Keep track of your customer — as to all 
that pertains to him ; of his successes or 
reverses ; thus you will be in a position to 
increase or diminish the account, as the 
case may be. 

BE CAREFULL. 

We must be careful not to drive away a 
good customer whom it is safe to trust, and 
more careful not to extend credit to custom- 
ers who either cannot or will not pay. 

Fear and Friendly Hope and Envy 
watch the issue, while the lines "By which 
thou shalt be judged " are written down. 



SALUTING THE QUEEN. 

One of the best calendars and especially 
appropriate at the present time is " Soldiers 
of the Queen," which the Queen City Oil 
Co. are sending out. It represents a High- 
lander, a South Wales lancer and a Cana- 
dian mounted infantryman saluting and 
cheering a large portrait of the Queen. The 
drawing is excellent and there is no doubt 
that the whole calendar will be much 



appreciated by anyone fortunate enough to 
get one before the supply is exhausted. No 
doubt any of our readers may have one by 
writing them. 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES. ASSIGNMENTS . COMPROMISES. 

A MEETING of the creditors of E. 
A. Atkinson, general merchant, 
L'Avenir, Que., has been called. 

John W. Gordon, harness dealer, Embro, 
Ont., has assigned. 

Alp. Boulanger, general merchant, St. 
Eugene, Que., has assigned. 

Premont & Co., general merchants, St. 
Felicite, Que., are offering 40c. on the 
dollar. 

L. A. Dixon, general merchant, St. 
Eustache, Que., is offering 40c. cash on the 
dollar. 

Leask & Rankin, merchants, Cranbrook, 
B.C., have assigned to Creighton R. 
Palmer. 

A meeting of the creditors of Noe Page, 
general merchant, Crysler, Ont., has be«n 
called. 

J. O. A. Dequire, general merchant, Glen 
Robertson, Ont., has assigned to Nap. 
Geneau. 

G. Bremner & Son, general merchants, 
Cranbrook, B.C., have assigned to Robert 
E. Sherlock. 

A meeting of the creditors of R. Bourbeau, 
general merchant, Victoriaville, Que., has 
been called. 

John J. Wiens, general merchant, Low 
Farm, Man., has assigned to John Russell, 
and his stock has been sold. 

Brown & Brown, general merchants, etc., 
Whitebourne, Newfoundland, have applied 
for declaration of insolvency. 

Esdras Paradis, general merchant, 
Plessisville, Que., has assigned, and a 
meeting of his creditors has been called. 

A meeting of the creditors of P. J. 
Stinson & Co., general merchants, Sing- 
hampton, Ont., will be held today (Friday). 

Fanny Markson, general merchant, Glen 
Robertson, Ont., has assigned to A. Mark- 
son, Alexandria, Ont., and a meeting of 
her creditors will be held on February 4. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipmen:i 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT- 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



T. N. Gauthier, general merchant, 

Carillon, Que., has assigned to Kent & 

Turcotte. He is offering 50c. cash on the 
. dollar. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Moreau & Desjardins, blacksmiths, 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

Roussin & Desjardins, blacksmiths, 
Montreal, have registered partnership. 

Partnership has been registered by J. P. 
Luneau & Frere, blacksmiths, St. Helene, 
Que. 

W. H. Otto & Co., general merchants, 
Elmira, Ont., have dissolved. W. H. Otto 
continues. 

Van Blaricom & Currie, dealers in agri- 
cultural implements, Arden, Man., have 
dissolved. 

Partnership has been registered by John 
McDougall & Co. as car wheel manufacturers 
in Montreal. 

Partnership has been registered by 
Gregoire & Bourque, sawmillers, St. Ger- 
main, Que. 

E. C. McLellan & Co., general merch- 
ants, Tatamagouche, N.S., have dissolved. 
The business will be continued by E. C. 
McLellan alone. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

L. Robins, general merchant, Albuna, 
Ont., has sold out. 

The assets of M. Forget, sawmiller, 
Quebec, have been sold. 

T. W. Davis, hardware dealer, etc., 
Ripley, Ont., has sold out. 

H. Davis, blacksmith, Kinnicott, Ont., 
is advertising his business for sale. 

The assets of J. A. Andrews, tinsmith, 
Kinburn, Ont., are to be sold at auction. 

The assets of J. E. I. Clavel, coal and 
wood merchant, Montreal, are to be sold. 

T. G. Lewis & Co., hardware dealers, 
etc., Montreal, have retired from business. 

Gaun Christie, general merchant, South 
Mountain, Ont., is advertising his business 
for sale by tender. 

The stock of Lewin & Co., general 
merchants, Moosomin, Man., is advertised 
for sale by tender. 

The stock of the estate of H. Grenier, 
hardware dealer, Quebec, has been sold at 
75 'Ac. on the dollar. 

The assets of Eugene Guay, general 
merchant, St. Jerome (Chicoutimi), Que., 
are to be sold on Saturday. 

The stock of the W. F. Horton Co., 
bicycle dealers, etc., London, Ont., is to be 
sold by auction on February 4. 

E. C. Corbett, general merchant, 
Verschoyle and Mount Elgin, Ont., is 
advertising his business for sale. 

The stock, etc., of the estate of E. J. 
Crawford, general merchant, Souris, Man., 
is advertised for sale by auction. 

The stock, etc., of F. G. Terryberry, 



The Nails and Sugar 
of the Paint Business. 

White lead is to the paint dealer what nails are to the hard- 
ware dealer and sugar to the grocer. 

But only in one respect. 

It's the no profit line, but it isn't a necessity. 

The hardware men and grocers have nothing to offer in the 
place of nails and sugar. They are forced to sell them, profit or 
no profit. 

The paint men have S.-W.P. — better than white lead in every 
way and sold at a good profit. They can push white lead out of the 
market with it. 

They can make money and reputation with it. And if that's 
what you are in "business for, why do you keep on advocating goods 
that are losing money for you ? 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



Ntfr YORK. 
MONTREAL. 



BOSTON. 
TORONTO 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY. 




general merchant, Burford, Ont., is adver- 
tised for sale by auction to day (Friday). 

The stock of J. A. Plamondon, general 
merchant, St. Raymond, Que., has been 
sold at 53c. on the dollar to J. T. Marcotte, 
St. Bazile. 

CHANGES. 

Adams & Coate, hardware dealers, 
Kingsville, Ont., have sold out to Telfer & 
Oliver. 

Lowther & Co., general merchants, etc., 
Russell, Man., have sold out to Smellie 
Bros. & Co. 

Well wood & Sales, carriagemakers, etc., 
Merlin, Ont., have been succeeded by 
Sales & Archer. 

J. U. Charters, dealer in agricultural im- 
plements, Melita, Man., has been succeeded 
by James McCallum. 

D. W. Mathewson & Co., general mer- 
chants. Lower Woodstock, N.B., have been 
succeeded by A. W. Hay. 

The style of The Diamond Oil and 
Grease Co., Hamilton, Ont., has been 
changed to The Commercial Oil Co. 

FIRES. 

The stock of D. Irwin, general merchant, 
Elgin, Man. , has been damaged by fire. 

J. Fennell & Son, hardware and coal 
dealers, Berlin, Ont., have suffered loss by 
fire ; insured. 

Temple & McGuire, hardware dealers, 



and W. H. Bull, harness dealer, etc., 
Elgin, Man., have been burned out. 

DEATHS. 

C. J. Chisholm, importer of steel, etc., 
Montreal, is dead. 



INQUIRIES REGARDING CANADIAN 
TRADE. 

The following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the High Commissioner's office, 
in London, England : 

t. Inquiry has been received from an agent in London 
for names of Canadian firms desiring to be represented at 
the forthcoming Exhibition in Glasgow 

2. A correspondent asks for information concerning ihe 
manufacture of soap, candles, starch, paper and turnery in 
Canada 

[The names of the firms making the 
above inquiries, can be obtained on applica- 
tion to the editor of Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. When asking for names, kindly 
give number of paragraph and date of issue.] 

Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
London, England, is in receipt of the 
following inquiries : 

r. A Manchester firm of brokers would like to hear 
from Canadian shippers of tallow, paraffin wax, starch, 
resin, e'.c. 

2. A Scotch firm asks for names of Canadian produ.ersof 
excelsior. 

3. An Irish firm desires to be placed in correspondence 
wih Canadian makers of cur ed hair. 

4 A firm manufacturing engineers' tools, turbines, fans, 
steam pumps, etc., would be prepared to appoint resident 
Canadian agent if an opening exists fcr the sale of above 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PAINT VS. RUBBER. 

A SWIFT, hot and spirited old-time 
game of hockey, was enjoyed by 
quite a crowd of spectators in the 
White Star rink, Montreal, on Tuesday 
evening last, when teams from The Canada 
Paint Co. and The Canadian Rubber Co., 
crossed sticks. The rubber men, while 
more elastic in their movements than the 
••Elephants," stormed The Canada Paint 
Co.'s goal without avail till near the close 
of the game. At each attack they harm- 
lessly rebounded to the far end of the rink, 
while the puck in its various ramifications 
was shot into the goal of The Canadian 
Rubber Co. no less than four times, three 
goals being scored in the first half. Briefly, 
the match was won by The Canada Paint 
Co.'s team by 4 to 1. It is conceded on all 
sides that The Canadian Rubber Co.'s team 
played a brilliant game, and with a little 
more practice would give the paint men a 
hard rub. It was the team play of the paint 
men that carried the day, and Capt. Munro 
is to be congratulated, not only on his own 
brilliant work, but also on the effectiveness 
of his team. Mr. H. Brigger, the rubber 
captain, is also deserving of a good deal of 
commendation. 

The feature of the match was a bold 
length-of-the-rink dash by Mr. Russell, of 
the paint staff, who is said to have limbs on 
him like those of a derrick, making him a 
tower of strength. The attacks of the 
catachouc men against him availed them 
little more than nothing. 

This makes the second victory for the 
Canada Paint Co., they having defeated the 
Baylis Manufacturing Co. 2 goals to 1. 

At the close of the match a French- 
Canadian spectator remarked : " B' gosh, 
zee puck, she go fro and too like zee chain 
lightning de grease. She remin' wan of 
my bob-tailed stallion Jeanette when she go 
two twenty on de (h)ice on ze grand course 
de trot." 



A BRANCH HOUSE FOR WINNIPEG. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co. are opening a 
branch office and sample-room in the city of 
Winnipeg, which will be under the manage- 
ment of Mr. Thos. L. Waldon, well known 
by the hardware trade of Manitoba and the 
Northwest. 

Leading lines of heavy hardware will be 
carried in stock in Winnipeg. Mi. Waldon 
will travel on the branch lines, giving a 
large share of his attention to the city of 
Winnipeg. 

Mr. Norman J. Dinnen will cover the 
territory on the main line. Mr. John Burns, 
jr., and Mr. Colin C. Brown will retain 
their present districts in British Columbia. 



Iver Johnson Bicycles 

Honest Cycles 

At ^^ 

Honest Prices. 

THE DISTINCTIVE CYCLE OF THE FUTURE. 

We want good agents to handle the Iver Johnson line of cycles. We 
have an interesting agency proposition, and our goods are recognized as standard. 
Thoroughly up-to-date, they are well known, well liked and well advertised. 
They are in demand and the Iver Johnson agency will prove profitable. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND AGENCY PROPOSITION. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 



Branches— New York— 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester- 364 Main St. 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 






We manufacture first 
quality 



AND RASPS. 



All shapes, sizes and 
cuts. 




Made from first quality Crucible File Steel. Every file tested and warranted. Prices always right. For sale 
by all prominent hardware merchants from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

THE GLOBE FILE MANUFACTURING CO., - PORT HOPE, ONT, 



BOECKH'S 



80 YORK STREET 



We pay special attention to the design and quality of all our 
brushes and our long experience enables us to turn out an article 
that will give satisfaction in every detail. Our prices are lower 
than those of other manufacturers. 



PAINT BRUSHES 

The most attractive and best wearing 
lines on the market. All neatly boxed 
and labelled. 



FINE BRUSHES 

Suitable for Carriage Painters, Artists, 
etc. The best assortment to be found 
anywhere. Quality unsurpassed. 



HOUSEHOLD BRUSHES 

All the latest and most improved designs 
and styles. They are possessed of a last- 
ing quality not found in others. 



KALSO. BRUSHES 

A superior line in all lengths and sizes. 
They never fail to give satisfaction, and 
will outwear any other make. 



HORSE DANDY and CflRR|flGE brushes 

A high standard of quality and finish in 
all lines. Half a century's experience 
enables us to make a perfect brush. 



FLEXIBLE BRIDLES 

Are the simplest and best method for bridling 
Round or Flat Faint Brushes. They are an 
immense advantage in making sales. You have 
something that will interest and benefit your 
customers and no extra charge for the bridle. 



When in the city give us a call. We want you to see our samples. 

Boeckh Bros. & Company 

TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

LUMBERMEN'S SUPPLIES. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



rj m*. sZ^Hl Ji^ >^ £>. f^b. /^^a> 

■^0 ^Md ^^^h*# ^^M0 ^^^ t^^^^9 <«^ 
<^^f <^^^ ^4fc^^ ^^f V .fcr-^0 '^^^ 



Axes. 

Handles. 

X Cut Saws. 



Repair Links. 




Proof Coil Chain. 



Files, 
Hammers, 
Wrenches, 
etc. 



Repair Links. 




Bright 



3-16 to % -inch in Stock. 

/ ' IRAN WEDGES. 





"Ingall's" Japanned. 



Hfc 







Cant Hooks. 



Peavies. 





Lumbermen's Boot Calks. 



Pike Poles. 



i - - - — — ■ - 



...,. ,,— ■■- -..->. — _ t^w^^ ,^..-^.- ; -:„ . ,,- ■_■ -„.-„■_. ._ _,m 




H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



WE SHIP 
PROMPTLY. 



Graham Wire and Cut Nails are the Best. 



OUR PRIOES 
ARE RIGHT. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES. BOOKLETS. ETC. 

A TALK ABOUT RANGES. 

THE Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, are 
sending out one of the most practical 
pamphlets Hardware and Metal 
has read for some time. It purports to be 
a conversation between Mrs. Needarange 
and Mr. Active Hustler. Mrs. Needarange 
enters Mr. Hustler's store and asks to see a 
range. The manner in which the good 
points of the "Imperial Oxford" are 
described by the latter is well worth read- 
ing. Hardware merchants should read this 
carefully, and then pass it on to their 
clerks. 

A DAINTY CALENDAR. 

The Rollman Manufacturing Co., Mount 
Joy, Pa., have issued an attractive calendar, 
which should prove handy to hang up in an 
office, as, while it is of moderate size, the 
calendar pad is large enough to be easily 
read at some distance. Above the calendar 
pad is a half-tone drawing, showing a Roll- 
man cherry seeder in position, with a couple 
of plates of luscious cherries near by. The 
calendar will be sent to any of the trade. 

CLAYTON AIR COMPRESSORS 

The Clayton Air Compressor Works, New 
York, are sending out their catalogue No. 
ii. It includes descriptions of the entire 
machine and parts of compressors of every 
type, and for all pressures and for every 
purpose to which compressed air is applied. 
This firm make it their endeavor to avoid 
complicated innovations, adopting only such 
changes as have proven of practical value. 
Their claims for superiority are based upon 
the fundamental points of a good air com- 
pressor, such as simplicity of design, 
economy in consumption of power, effi- 
ciency in air compression, accessibility and 
durability of working parts and perfect 
automatic regulation. 

On account of the reputation of this firm, 
their catalogue should be secured by all 
who use or handle air compressors. Their 
address is Havemeyer Building, Cortlandt 
street, New York. 



MR. DACK IS PRESIDENT. 

At the anual meeting of the Commercial 
Travellers' Mutual Benefit Society, on 
Saturday, the following were elected 
officers for the ensuing year : 

President — W. B. Dack (acclamation). 

Vice-President — Dan A. Rose. 

Treasurer — John A. Ross. 

Trustees for Toronto to fi.l vacancies on the 
board — John Orr. John Brasier, Geo. McQuillan, 
W. R. Madill and J. M. Woodland. 

Trustees for Hamilton — John Hooper and E. A. 
Dalley. 

Auditors — Henry Barber and H. J. M. Bryant. 

President Dack, on assuming his office, 
made an appropriate and interesting ad 



dress. Votes of thanks were tendered to 
the retiring members of the board, Messrs. 
W. J. Hopwood, R. L. Patterson, W. F. 
Smith, F. J. Zamaners and N. A. Cockburn. 



ELECTRIC LIVERY IN TORONTO. 

C. A. Ward, Arch. Fairgrieve, W. S. 
Jackson, A. M. Thompson, J. T. Smith and 
A. F. Dodge have been incorporated under 
the style of The Electric Cab Co., Limited, 
of Toronto, to operate automobiles in 
Toronto. A meeting of the company was 
held at the Arlington Hotel, and the follow- 
ing officers elected : President, C. A. Ward, 
manager of the Arlington Hotel; vice- 
president, A. M.Thompson, of The Canadian 
Motor Co., Limited ; secretary-treasurer, W. 
S. Jackson, of James Robertson & Co. 

The Cyclorama building, near the Union 
Station, has been rented by the company. 
Two electric tally-hos and a number of 
smaller vehicles are nearly ready, and busi- 
ness will begin in the course of a month or 
so. 



WILL PAY 50C. ON THE DOLLAR. 

A Kingston despatch says that the divi- 
dend statement of the defunct Kingston 
Locomotive Works Co. , as prepared by A . 
F. Riddell and K. W. Blackweel, joint 
liquidators, and accepted by Judge Price, 
has been presented to the creditors. The 
liabilities are $339 .494, on which the assets 
will pay 50c. on the dollar, or a total o 
$169,747. 

The principal creditors are the Bank of 
Montreal, $ 172, 533 ; F. Edgar, Montreal, 
$75,296; James W. Pyke & Co., Montreal, 
$40,185; The Canada Switch and Spring 
Co., Montreal, $16,351. 



REDUCTION IN PRICE. 

We learn from the Canadian agent, Mr. 
Knox Henry, 1 Place Royale, Montreal, 
that Brassite goods have been reduced about 
20 per cent, all down the list. This will 
immensely increase the popularity of these 
goods in Canada, for, at these prices, their 
superiority of finish will give them a pre- 
eminent position on the market. Already 
inquiries are more numerous and orders 
heavier. 



SYDNEY AS A PORT. 

Over 17,000 vessels, including 700 ocean- 
going steamers, arrived in this harbor 
during the past season, their registered ton- 
nage amounting to upwards of 1,000,000, 
and their crews numbering over 27,000 sea- 
men. In point of arrivals, Sydney is thus 
to be classed among the great shipping 
ports of the world, and as regards ocean- 
going vessels, one of the greatest in Canada. 
— Sydney Record. 



MONTREAL BOARD OF TRADE 
OFFICERS. 

The following are the new officers of the 
Montreal Board of Trade : 

President, Mr. Henry Miles ; 1st Vice-president, 
Mr. F. W. Evans ; 2nd Vice-president, R. W. 
MacDougall ; Treasurer, A. J. Hodgson. 

Members of Council — Geo. E. Drummond, W. 
I. Gear, A. E. Ellis, R. Wilson-Smith, Robt. 
Munn, Alex. McFee, Charles Chaput, Alex. 
McArthur, P. W. McLagan, A. B. Evans, W. H. • 
Browne, J. C. Holden. 

Board of Arbitration — James Crathern, E. B. 
Greenshields, John McKergow, Robert Archer, 
Charles F. Smith, Robert Bickerdike, Robert 
Reford, Edgar Judge, Robert McKay, David 
MacFarlane, Adam G. Thomson, Charles Mc- 
Lean. 



RE-CUT FILES. 

On account of the many inquiries from 
the large consumers of files throughout the 
Dominion during the past two or three 
years, The Globe File Manufacturing Co., 
of Port Hope, Ont., have been compelled 
to add a re cutting department to their 
manufactory, and are now prepared to 
receive old files for re-cutting. Providing 
the blanks are shipped to them, sound, and 
free from rust, they claim that they can 
return the same goods re-cut, which will be 
in every respect equal to new files. They 
have issued a special net price list for this 
work, which may be had on application. 



WALKERVILLE MATCH FACTORY 
BURNED. 

The factory of The Walkerville. Ont., 
Match Co. was destroyed by fire on Friday, 
January 25, causing a loss estimated at 
$20,000 on stock and $5,000 on the build- 
ing. The fire, in the opinion of Mr. Ander- 
son, proprietor and manager of the company, 
was started by rats, and, owing to the 
inflammable nature of the contents, it spread 
rapidly. Two explosions were caused by 
carbide of potash becoming ignited. These 
blew the end and one side out of the build- 
ing. A deplorable feature in regard to the 
fire was the death of two firemen, caused 
by the explosion. 



OFF TO NEW GLASGOW. 

Mr. John Irving, the Montreal rolling 
mills representative in Toronto and the 
West, whose appointment as sales agent of 
The Nova Scotia Steel Co. was noted a 
couple of weeks ago, leaves on Sunday 
night for New Glasgow, N.S., where he will 
in future reside. 



A GRIPPE JOKE. 



Mr. J. H. Lyons, of Sidney, Shepard & 
Co., Buffalo, is in Toronto on a brief visit. 
" Did you hear the latest grippe joke ? " he 
said. And] then by way of explanation 
added: "The traveller comes in, lays 
down his'grip with the remark, ' I've got 
the grip, but (here he steps over it) I'm 
getting over it.' " 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



THE MONTREAL FIRE. 

THE hardware trade suffered rather 
severely from the disastrous fire that 
raged in the wholesale section of 
Montreal a week ago last Wednesday night. 
The destruction of the magnificent Board of 
Trade building turned a large number of 
agents out of quarters for the time being, 
and this week they have been able to do 
nothing but look for suitable offices and fix 
them up. Withal the loss, the fire has 
show that there is sympathetic feeling down 
deep in the hearts of the business men 



stock. He has taken temporary quarters at 
i Place Royale. 

Alex. Mc Arthur & Co., tarred and felt 
paper manufacturers, whose warehouse was 
situate next to Saxe & Co., lost their entire 
stock, which amounted to about $7,000. 
The loss is covered by insurance. All the 
firm's papers were saved. Temporary 
offices were taken at 87 St. Peter street, 
but a warehouse has been rented at 82 
McGill street, and the offices have been 
removed to this address. Business is being 
carried on as usual. 




View on Commissioners street, Montreal, showing where the big fire was stopped, two blocks* 
away from where it originated The tallest building is the ruin of Seybold, Sons J\ 
& Co.'s big hardware establishment. The rear entrance was on Com- 'L/ 

missioners street, the front on St. Paul street. 

, . — 1 — tfc^ 



towards their confreres. Many acts of kind- 
ness have been shown this week, and we do 
not need to say they will not be forgotten. 
Firms devoid of stock have been offered 
goods at special discounts by their con- 
temporaries, desks have been freely offered 
and all sorts of invaluable offers have been 
made. Most of the fire sufferers have 
secured new quarters and are carrying on 
business as usual. 

It is generally agreed that the Board of 
Trade building must be rebuilt. Action 
will probably be taken next week at the first 
meeting of council. The site will probably 
not be changed. 

A. C. Leslie & Co., who had offices in 
the Board of Trade building, lost every- 
thing in their office, except the contents of 
the vault, which were saved in good con- 
dition. Rooms have been rented in the 
Merchants Bank building, St. James street, 
and business will be continued as usual. 

Knox Henry, hardware agent, who had 
his office in the Board of Trade building, 
lost all bis stock and office furniture. His 
vault preserved his papers, but his insurance 
did not come within $300 of covering his 



The Thos. Davidson ManufacturinglCq.'s 
salesroom at 474 St. Paul was compjgtjjy 
gutted. The staff has been removecU to 
their works where all their customers' wants 
will be attend to. A down town office will 
probably be fitted up in due time. 

The Dominion Travellers' Association, 
which had its quarters in the Board of Trade 
building, lost everything, including some 
pictures and paintings of priceless value. 
New quarters have been fitted up at Room 
9, Bank of Toronto Chambers. 

H. A. Nelson & Sons' establishment was 
burned to the ground, forming one of the 
heaviest losses of the fire. The firm have 
decided to liquidate and go out of business 
so far as the Montreal end is concerned. 
The Toronto branch will be continued as 
heretofore. Temporary offices have been 
taken at 27 Common street. 



Peck, Benny & Co. saved all their papers 
and documents that were kept in their three 
vaults, and business is being conducted as 
usual. The city offices are now situate in 
the Chesterfield Chambers, St. Alexis street. 

Pillow & Hersey Manufacturing Co., 
Limited, were also sufferers. One vault, 
holding the heavy books, saved their con- 
tents, but the light copy books were de- 
stroyed. However, orders were filled on 
the following day without delay. The firm's 
city address is now 232 McGill street. 

Seybold, Son & Co.'s large hardware 
establishment, facing on St. Paul street and 
running back to Commissioners street, was 
one of the last buildings attacked by the 
flames, but it was completely gutted, and 
only the rear wall on Commissioners street 
was left standing. Mr. Seybold and his 
office staff were in the office when the fire 
broke out, and were busy balancing the 
books for the year. The books and papers 
were all saved, but the entire stock of shelf 
hardware, valued at $82,000, was destroyed. 
Fortunately, the heavy hardware was stored 
elsewhere. The insurance amounts to $70,- 
500. On the morrow after the fire, Mr. 
Seybold rented a warehouse at 148 McGill 
street, but the structure was found to be 
defective, and the address has been changed 
to 18 and 20 St. Sacrament street, which 
affords an office connection with the heavy 
hardware warehouse in the rear. Here the 
firm will be located until a large new ware- 
house is built on the old spot. Mr. Seybold 
says he will erect quarters unexcelled in the 
city for convenience and safety ; they will 
be especially for the hardware trade. Until 
he has laid in a stock of shelf goods, Mr. 
Seybold has made arrangements to fill all 
orders promptly through the courtesy of his 
confreres in the trade, and his customers 
need not fear that shipments will be slow or 
goods unsatisfactory. 

The Imperial Oil Co., who were in the 
Board of Trade building, have changed 
their address to 71 St. James street. Other 
hardware losers by the fire were : The 
NorthernElevatorCo. ; The Copeland Chatt- 
erson Co., (now in the Merchants Bank) ; 
J. B. Goode, hardware agent ; James 
Hutton & Co., hardware agents ; Magnolia 
Metal Co., American machinery ; Beard- 
more Belting Co., and Gall-Schneider Oil 
Co., Limited. H. W. DeCourtenay Co., 
Commissioners street, lost a stock of heavy 
metals valued at $25,000. 



KNOX HENRY 



Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker, 
MONTREAL. 

The big fire in the Board of Trade destroyed my office, 
but work goes on as usual, and al! enquires and orders wil 
be promptly attended to. 



Present Address, No. I Place Royale, Montreal. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A "PATENT LAW" DECISION. 

THE Court of King's Bench at Montreal 
last week, gave an important decision 
on an action arising out of the Cana- 
dian patent law. The Asbestos and Asbestic 
Co., Montreal, appealed from a judgment 
which dismissed a demand for a perpetual 
injunction and quashed the interlocutary 
injunction issued. The Asbestos Co. alleged 
that they acquired from the Danville 
Asbestos and Slate Co. asbestos mines in 
the township of Shipton ; that on July 5, 
1899, the company transferred and assigned 
to them a trade mark obtained by the former 
and registered on February 3. 1896. This 
trade mark has the words, " Asbestic Wall 
Plaster " surmounting a trowel, on which is 
inscribed the letter A. They state that the 
William Sclater Co. have been and are still 
using the words of the trade mark, and 
selling what purports to be an asbestic wall 
plaster stamped and lablelled as such, and 
the public is led to believe that it is buying 
a product of the Asbestos Co. The appel- 
lants claim that they have extensively 
advertised their product and established a 
lucrative business in selling asbestic wall 
plaster and have acquired a right of property 
in the trade-mark words. 

They asked for an injunction to restrain 
the Sclater Co. and their agents from further 
selling any goods or materials under the 
name of " asbestos wall plaster," and that 
the respondents be condemned to pay 
$1,000 damages. 

The Sclater Co. pleaded to the effect that 
the Asbestos Co. could not by the alleged 
trade mark, obtain the uses of the words, 
" asbestic wall plaster," and the Govern- 
ment of Canada could nojMke them the 
sole right to use those worB Bo, that they 
had sold "asbestic wallplaster " long 
previous to February 3, 1896, and since, 
and have the right to make use of the words 
•• asbestic wall plaster," the word " asbes- 
tic " being merely an indication and des- 
cription of the article sold by them. Their 
plea was maintained and the action dis- 
missed, the court being of opinion that the 
words "asbestic wall plaster" were des- 
criptive of the materials of which the com- 
pound consisted. In appeal the judgment 
was held to be well founded, and it was 
confirmed. 



WILL EXTEND THEIR WORKS. 

At the annual meeting of The Brandon, 
Man., Machine Works Co., the following 
officers were ejected : President, D. A. 
Hopper ; vice-president, E. H. Johnson ; 
manager, James Shirriff; secretary treasurer, 
Fred. Adolph. It was decided to erect this 
year new works which will be larger and 
better fitted in every respect than the present 



premises. The company now employs over 
30 men during the summer, and about 16 
during the cold weather. With the exten- 
sion of premises and largely increased plant 
now contemplated about 50 men will be 
employed all year round. 



SELF-CHALKING CHALK LINE. 

The Smith & Hemenway Co. are just 
putting on the market the automatic self- 
chalking chalk line. This is unique in its 
way, and is so constructed that it is impos- 




Self-Chalking Chalk Line. 

give anyone an insight to the merit of the 
article. 

The above firm publishes what is known 
as the " Green Book" of hardware special- 
ties, which will be sent out to anyone in the 
hardware business on application. When 
writing for this kindly mention that you saw 
it in Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



P. Denis, general merchant, St. Cesaire, 
Que., has assigned to Lamarche & Benoit. 



SIR FRANK SMITH'S ESTATE. 

THE estate of the late Senator Sir 
Frank Smith, according to his will, 
is valued at over a million and a 
quarter. The estate is made up as follows : 
Real estate in Toronto, London and Inger- 
soll, Ont.. $126,380 ; stock and bonds of 
Niagara Navigation Company and various 
bank stocks, $645,080 ; stock in gas com- 
panies, $257,077 ; bonds of various com- 
panies, $116,000; other stocks, $120,131 ; 
furniture, horses, carriages and sundry 
assets. $14,895 ; total, $1,279,564. 

By the will, which is dated July 10, 1897, 
the Toronto General Trusts Corporation is 
appointed executor and trustee, and all the 
estate is devised to the trustee in trust. The 
trustee is authorizod to sell any of the estate 
from time to time and to make investments 
on certain named securities, to give leases, 
also to change investments from time to 
time, and to retain, so long as the trustee 
thinks fit, any lands, property, assets of 
every kind. The succession duties are to 
be paid out of the capital of the estate. 
(These duties, amounting to about $65,000, 
go to charitable institutions of the Provin- 
cial Government.) 

Sir Frank leaves to the House of Pro- 
vidence, Toronto, $1,000 ; St. Michael's 
Hospital, $1,000, and to the House of 
Industry, $1,000 ; to his niece, Mary 
Munro, $400 per annum during her life, 
and to four other nieces, daughters of his 
sister Margaret, $500 each. To his nephew, 
Andrew Munro, $500. In respect to his 
only surviving son he makes a provision of 
$4,000 per year. He gives $600 per annum 
out of income to each of his grandchildren 
so long as the parent of such grandchild is 
living. On the death of the parent of such 
grandchild the income of the grandchild is 
increased and such grandchild takes a 
share of the income of the estate in propor- 
tion to the number of grandchildren. One- 
third of the rest of the income is given to 
each of his daughters for her life. On the 
death of either of his two daughters now 
living the present husband of any such 
daughter \$ to receive $1,200 per annum. 

At the expiration of 20 years from Sir 
Frank's death, or on the death of the last 
surviving of his children (whichever date or 
event shall last happen), the capital is to be 
divided between his grandchildren in equal 
shares. 

The wish is expressed that John Foy and 
Robert H. McBride continue as directors of 
the Niagara Navigation Company, and 
directs that John Foy receive a power of $ 
attorney to represent his estate at meetings 
of shareholders of the Niagara Navigation 
Company and of the Home Savings and 
Loan Company. Any unexpected income 
of an infant, who may die before coming of 
age, falls into and forms part of the estate. 
He wishes his grandson, Frank A. Harrison 
(an orphan), to be brought up by one of his 
daughters, Mrs. Macdonald or Mrs. John 
Foy. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS. 

THERE is a popular misconception that 
the diamonds used by glaziers are 
the rejected stones, of poor quality, 
that are worthless as gems, but such is not 
the case. It is incorrect, at least as far as 
it applies to such glaziers' diamonds as pass 
trough the hands of A. Shaw & Sons. Mr. 
Robt. Shaw, the present head of this old 
established house, in fact, the oldest house 
in the trade, recently gave us some informa- 
tion about the setting of these diamonds that 
is of interest. Mr. Shaw's great-grandfather 
founded this business over a century back, 
and invented the glaziers' diamonds now in 
universal use. During four generations, 
therefore, this house has been building up a 
reputation, with the result that now, not 
only do they supply their own regular 
customers, but they have a large and increas- 
ing trade with other manufacturers of 
glaziers' diamonds. 

The diamonds used for glass cutting are 
imported chiefly from Brazil and South 
Africa. They come in the rough form and 
vary in size from 30 to toe carat up to 10 to 
the carat. From the original parcels, but a 
small proportion is selected, the fine quality 
stones suitable for cutting glass being very 
scarce. Any diamond will scratch glass, 
but all will not cut, so as great care is 
required in selecting stones for glaziers' 
purposes as for jewelers'. If the stones are 
of the proper sort, of good shape, with good 
angles, etc., they do not require cutting or 
other treatment before being set. 

The greatest care must be taken to have 
the cutting angles adjusted perfectly true, 
otherwise the diamond will not cut satis- 
factorily, but will soon become useless. A 
diamond-setter who knows his business can 
set a poor stone in such a way that it will 
do better work than, and outlast a good 
stone that has been set improperly. Things 
are not done by chance in the workrooms of 
A. Shaw & Son. Skilled workmen only 
are employed and the article in hand is 
put through numerous tests during Us treat- 
ment, so by this means none but reliable 
cutters leave the factory. 

In addition to the ordinary glaziers' 
diamonds, with and without racks, they 
produce folding diamonds, pocket knives 
with diamonds, and many devices in the 
form of circle arms, beam compasses, etc., 
for doing circular cutting and for cutting 
guage glass, glass shades etc. Mr. Shaw 
is prepared to reset diamonds for any 
readers of Hardware who may have 
stones that have become useless, the 
charge being very low as compared with the 
ultimate value of the reset stone. 



R. K. McKenzie, general merchant, 
Middle River, N.S., is dead. 



PAINT 
PROGRESS 




SAYS PAINTS are progressive paints. 

Id modes and styles have changed. Don't 
keep ofrjselling cheap, poor paints. Don't 
beg|0 wi^h cheap paints. Money is made 

th the best. 



RAMSAYS PAINTS are paints for the 
money-maker because they are pure paints — 
best paints. 

RAMSAYS PAINTS are money-making 
paints because they are sold at a price that 
allows the dealer a handsome profit. 

The whole thing in paint progress is money- 
making paints — ■ Ramsays Paints — Best 
Paints. 



A. RAMSAY & SON, 

Est'd 1842 

PAINTMAKERS, MONTREAL. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER AND CLIP. 



..psMp/V, 



U. S. Patent June 25th, 1895. 
Canadian Pat. Dec. 13th, 1894. 



^^H 




■ Sold by Jobbers of - - - 




s 






BS® HARDWARE 
9 t TINWARE 
and STOVES, 


feS'SUQUE, V°*! 


for furnace pipe, to support 
the sheet steel blade 








-t 




Manufactured by 



THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 



Here it is 

THE NEW CENTURY 

BANNER 
COLD BLAST 
LANTERN 

(Patented January, 1901) 

Possesses the following advantages over 
all other makes : 

Handsome in Design. 
Perfect in Construction. 
Magnificent Light— 20 Candle Power. 

The Lantern of the age for outside light, either on 
land or sea. Every BANNER Lantern has a brass 
plate bearing our name and guarantee. 



The Ontario Lantern Co., 

Hamilton, Ont. 

WALTER GROSE, Montreal, 

Sole Selling Agent. 







CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, February i, 1901. 
HiRDWARE. 

ALTHOUGH trade continues to im- 
prove, the advance is slow and 
the volume of business being done 
jast now is not great. Heavy goods are 
quiet, a few lots are being shipped from 
stock, but business is mostly confined to 
spring account. Nails remain in about the 
old position, inquiry being for small 
amounts. Wires are not attracting much 
attention. Shelf goods are the most active 
articles on the list and the demand for them 
continues in a sorting way. Poultry netting 
and green wire cloth are being booked for 
spring in fair sized lots and ice cream 
freezers are now beginning to go. Glass is 
now being booked for import, although 
some houses refuse to take orders. Mrs. 
Potts sad irons have been slightly reduced 
during the week, and are now selling at 70c. 
for polished and 75c. for nickle plated. 
Screen doors and windows are being ordered 
in good supply, while harvest tools and 



spades and shovels are also commencing to 
be booked, v^ ^ 

Barb Wire '—"Little orino bnsiness is 
doing, and the market i,s)freBtureless. The 
price is still $3.20 f.o.b. Montreal in less 
than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — No attention seems 
to be paid to this line, and very little 
business is being done in it. We 
quote : No. 5. #4.25; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge 
#3-55 : No - 9. $3-!°; No. 10, 13.75 ; 
No. 11, $3.85 ; No. 12, S3. 25 ; No. 13, 
$3.35; No. 14, $4.25; No. 15, $4.75; 
No. 16, $5.00. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is no new 
feature to note, and trade continues in the 
same lines as before. The price is $2.80 
per 100 lb. 

Fine Steel Wire — A small trade is 
passing The discount is 17 }4 per cent, off 
the list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — The usual 
demand is being experienced. Discounts 
are 55 and z% per cent, on brass, and 
50 and 2j£ per cent, on copper. 



Fence Staples — Little business is being 
done as yet. We quote : $3. 25 for brigfc*," 
and S3. 75 for galvanized, per keg of 
100 lb. 

Wire Nails — The demand for wire nails 
is not brisk, and only immediate needs 
create an inquiry. Quite a number of small 
lots have been shipped this week. We 
quote 52.85 for small lots and #2.75 for 
carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Gananoque, and St. John, N.B. 

Cut Nails — The demand is limited, 
only small lots are moving. We quote as 
follows : S2.35 for small and #2.25 for 
carlots ; flour barrel nails, 25 per cent, 
discount; coopers' nails, 30 per cent, 
discount. 

Horse Nails — The Manufacturers' 
Association has been dissolved and open 
prices now prevail. As yet values have not 
been changed. At their meeting this week, 
the manufacturers may reorganize. Dis- 
counts are still 50 per cent, on standard, 
and 50 and 10 per cent, on Acadia. 

Horseshoes — The demand continues 



UNIFORMITY of SIZE Is' 

dfl inirnA»T5). 




^Cuky's Sanson Bottom 

i ttKSKO SlAMb 10 :0UfX7 Dlitf. 



>ther great feature to be considered in the 

less Milk Can Bottom 

This is a great conveni- 
ence in fitting body 
tin to bottoms. 

Slides easily. 

No sharp corners to 
tear the flooring. 



Will always wear round. 



LONDON. 



Patented July 23, 1900. 

£ McOLARV M 

TORONTO. MONTREAL. WINNIPEG. 

A SURE THING because it's Guaranteed. 



VANCOUVER. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



DISPLAY 

Your stock on the front of 




BENNETT'S PATENT SHELF BOX 

and your store will be a great attraction 
to customers. 

Prices and full particulars from 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave,, Toronto. 

N.B. -Don't forget we make boxes to fit your pres- 
ent shelving. 



Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 Wellington street, MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



StWLfWPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
iraulic and other Machinery where great strength 
-s requirec ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



quite brisk. There has been no change 
in prices. We quote : Iron shoes, light 
and medium pattern, No. 2 and larger, $ 3. 50; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 
2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.00 ; X L steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.85 ; feather-weight, all sizes, 54.85; toe 
weight steel shoes, all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, ioc. extra. 

Poultry Netting — The discount is s i'l 
50 and 5 per cent. More spring business 
has been done this week. 

Green Wire Cloth — Fair orders are 
being taken. The price remains at #1.35 
per 100 sq. ft. 

Freezers — A few orders are coming in, 
although some houses are not out with their 
quotations yet. 

Sad Irons — Mrs. Potts sad irons have 
been slightly reduced this week and are now 
selling at 70c. for full polished and 75c. 
for nickel-plated. 

Screen Doors and Windows — The 
travellers are booking fairly good orders. 
We quote: Screen doors, plain cherry finish, 
J8.25 per doz.; do. fancy, #11.50 per doz.; 
windows, $2.25 to 53.50 per doz. 

Screws — A good sorting trade is being 
done and some letter orders have been 
received this week. Discounts are 
as follows : Flat head bright, 85 per 
cent, off list ; round head bright, 80 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 77^ percent.; round 
head brass, 70 per cent. 

Bolts — Inquiry has been moderate this 
week. Discounts are : Carriage bolts, 
65 per cent. ; machine bolts, 65 per cent. ; 
coach screws, 75 per cent.; sleigh shoe 
bolts, 75 per cent. ; bolt ends, 65 per cent. ; 
plough bolts, 50 per cent.; square nuts, 
4>£c. per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 4^c. 
per lb. off list; tire bolts, 67% per cent.; 
stove bolts, 67% percent. 

Building Paper — Quite a number of 
orders for spring delivery have been placed 
this week, but trade is not at all brisk. We 
quote: Tarred felt, $1.70 per 100 lb.; 2 -ply, 
ready roofing, 80c. per roll ; 3-ply, $ 1.05 
per roll; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; dry 
sheathing, 30c. per roll ; tar sheathing, 
40c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll ; 
tarred fibre, 60c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X L , 
65c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, #28 
per ton ; slaters' felt, 50c. per roll. 

Rivets — A fair business is being done 
at unchanged prices. The discount on 
best iron rivets, section, carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off; copper rivets, 35 
and 5 per cent, off; and coppered iron rivets 



TINPLATE8 

" Lydbrook," " Grafton," 
" Allaways," etc. 

TINNED SHEETS 

" Wilden " Brand and 
cheaper makes. 

All s zes and gauges imported. 



A. C. LESLIE k CO. 

MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Foroe, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait, Canada. 



ADMl HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 



We have in stock 



PIG TIN 
INGOT COPPER 
LAKE COPPER 
PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



'T'HERE is an old saying : " You cannot get too 
* much of a good thing." That is why we 
keep harping at you about 

ELASTILITE VARNISH. 




If you get tired reading our ads. about it, send for one of 
the above cabinets and you will never have to tire yourself 
talking to sell it. One can sells another. You cannot afford 
to be without it. 



-MANUFACTURED ONLY BY- 



The 



f J Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont. 

Large new stock of all leading lines. 
Headquarters for . . . 



Linseed Oil 
Paints 

Window Glass 
Building Paper 
Harvest Tools 



Screen Doors 
Lawn Mowers 
Cordage 
Paris Green 
Etc. 



Also large and full assortment of 

CUTLERY 



of all leading manufacturers. 



and burrs, in 5-lb. carton boxes, are quoted 
at 60 and 10 percent, off list. 

Cordage — Prices are steady. Manila 
isquoted at 13c. per lb. for 7-16 and larger; 
sisal at 9c and lathyarn 9c. per lb. In 
small lots y 2 c. per lb. higher is charged. 

Spades and Shovels — A little business 
for spring delivery has been done this week. 
The discount is still 40 and 5 per cent, off 
the list. 

Harvest Tools — A few orders are being 
placed at 50, 10 and 5 per cent, discount. 

Tacks — Prices are unchanged this week. 
We quote : Carpet tacks, in dozens and 
bulk, blued 80 and 5 per cent, discount ; 
tinned, 80 and 10 per cent. ; cut tacks, 
blued, in dozens, 75 and 15 per cent, dis- 
count. 

Churns — Some spring business is being 
done at a discount of 56 per cent. 

Firebricks — A small jobbing trade is 
being done at $18.50 to $26, as to brand. 

Cement — Few sales are taking place. 
We quote: German, $2.50 to $2. 65; Eng- 
lish, $2.40 to $2.50; Belgian, J1.90 to 

$2.15 per bbl. 

METALS. 

The market is generally steady. Canada 
plates are rather weak, cable quotations 
being somewhat lower this week. Tin- 
plates, terne plates and galvanized iron are 
all beginning to move for next year. The 



rolling mills seem to be pretty busy, and 
are not disposed to make concessions. 

Pig Iron — Summerlee continues at $24 
to $25, with Canadian pig worth $19 to $20. 
It is said that the demand shows some 
slight improvement. 

Bar Iron — The market is steady at $1.65 
to $1.70 per 100 lb. 

Black Sheets — A little better inquiry is 
noticed this week. Prices rule at $2. 80 for 
8 to 16 gauge. 

Galvanized Iron — Spring business is 
flourishing. Buying seems to be safe, 
as the market bears a firm tone. We 
quote: No. 28 Queen's Head, $5 to $5.10 ; 
Apollo, 10^ oz., £5 to $5.10 Comet, No. 
28, $4.50 with 25c. allowance in case lots. 

Ingot Copper — Some business is being 
done at i7J^c. 

Ingot Tin — Foreign markets appear to 
be very much unsettled, but yet steady. 
London quotes about /122, varying from 
day to day about this figure, which means 
27c. laid down in New York. Prices here 
are 32 to 33c. 

Lead — The price of lead is steady at 
$4- 65. 

Lead Pipe — A moderate demand is being 
experienced. We quote : 7c. for ordinary 
and 7J£c. for composition waste, with 15 
per cent. off. 



Iron Pipe — Business is of fair volume. 
We quote as follows: Black pipe, Jf, $3 
per 100 ft. ; #, $3 ; %, $3 ; %, JS3.15 ; 
1 -in. ,#4.50; \%,%(y.\o\ i%,$7.2S; 2-in., 
$9.7?. Galvanized, % t $4.60 ; %, $5.25 ; 
lin., $7.50; 1%, $9.80; 1 }£, $11.75 ; 2- 
in., $16. 

Tinplates — A fair demand continues to 
be experienced, and some business is doing 
on spring account. The ruling figures for 
immediate delivery are $4. 50 for coke and 
$4. 75 for charcoal. 

Canada Plate — There is little buying 
going on just now, as cable advices indicate 
a falling market. Stocks in hand now are 
light, and bring full figures. We quote as 
follows: 52's, $2.90; 6o's, $3; 75's, 
$3. 10; full polished, $3.75, and galvanized, 
$4.60. 

Tool Steel— We quote: Black Diamond, 
8c; Jessop's 12c. 

Steel — No change. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, $1.85 ; tire, $1.95 ; spring, $2.75 ; 
machinery, $2. 75 and toe-calk, $2.50. 

Terne Plates — Some little inquiry is 
coming in this week, and spring stocks are 
being arranged for. We quote $8 .25. 

Swedish Iron— Unchanged at $4.25. 

Coil Chain — The coil chain market is 
quite firm, and an advance is anticipated. 
A good many orders are being booked. We 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



quote: No. 6, 1 1 %c. ; No. 5, ioc. ; No. 4, 9 %c. ; 
No. 3, 9c; X-inch, 7%c. per lb.; 5-16, 
84. 60; 5-16 exact, $5.10; ^,$4.20; 7-16, 

$4.00; %, $3.75; 9-16, $3-65; #. #3-35; 

tf.*3- 2 5; #.$3-2o; i-in., $3.15. In car- 
load lots an allowance of ioc. is made. 

Sheet Zinc — The ruling price is 6 to 6 # c. 

Antimony — Quiet, at ioc. 

GLASS. 

Orders for spring delivery are being 
booked on a basis of 52.75 for first break, 
and $ 1. 85 for second break for 50 feet. 
The primary markets are firm. Small 
amounts are being shipped from stock. We 
quote: First break, $2; second, $2.10 
for 50 leet ; first break, 100 feet, $3.80 ; 
second, $4 ; third, $4.50; fourth, $4.75; 
fifth, $5.25; sixth, 85-75. and seventh, 
6.25. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

Raw and burnt sienna ground in oil has 
been advanced 2c. per lb., and pure raw 
and burnt umber ic. per lb. by the leading 
colormakers. A fair amount of business 
has been done since last week, and, as 
Febiuary is now at hand, prospects seem to 
be brightening. Turpentine is keeping 
low and steady, while linseed oil, for pre- 
sent delivery, is quite firm. A brisk in- 
quiry has opened out for paris green, and 
all the jobbers are busily engaged placing 
orders. Spring sales seem to be larger than 
last year. Stocks in the country are light. 
There has been some inquiry heard for 
brick paint and oxides for spring shipment, 
and while at present the factories are not 
extra busy, it is thought that the trade will 
open out with vim in the first week of 
February. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, #6.75 ; No. 1, $6 yj l / t ; No. 2, 
$6 ; No. 3, $5 62^, and No. 4, $5.25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 
or four months. 

Dry White Lead — $5-75 in casks; 
kegs, $6. 

Red Lead — Casks, $5.50; in kegs, 
*5-75- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6%z.\ in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7j£c. 

Putty — We quote : Bulk, in barrels, 
$2 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity, $215; 
bladders, in barrels, $220; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, $2 35; in tins, 
$2 45 to $2.75 ; in less than 100-lb. lots, 
$3 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces ioc. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 
* Linseed Oil — Raw, 80c; boiled, 83c, 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic. less, 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and 0>hawaat 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

Turpentine— Single bbls., 59c; 2 to 4 
bbls., 58c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — $1.25 to $1.45 per gal. 



Castor Oil— 8 tf to 9^c. in wholesale 
lots, and %c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil— 47 j£ to 49c. 

Cod Oil — 32^ to 35c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resinsr 
82.75 to $4 50, as to brand ; coal tar, $3 .25 
to 53.75 ; cotton waste, \Y 2 to 5>£c. fo, 
colored, and 6 to 7j£c. for white ; oakum, 
$ l A to 6j£c, and cotton oakum, 10 to lie. 

Paris Green — Petroleum barrels, i6^c. 
per lb. ; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, I7^c; 25-lb. drums, 18c; i-lb. 
packages, i8^c; >£-lb. packages, 20 j£c. ; 
i-lb. tins, ig'/ic.; ^ -lb. tins, 21 y 2 c. f.o.b. 
Montreal; terms 3 percent. 30 days, or four 
months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The market is quiet, and remains 
steady. Dealers are paying the fol- 
lowing prices in the country : Heavy 
copper and wire, 13 to I3j£c per lb. ; light 
copper, 12c. ; heavy brass, 12c; heavy 
yellow, Zyi to 9c. ; light brass, 6yi to 
7c; lead, 2|^ to 3c. per lb.; zinc, 2% to 
2^c; iron, No. 1 wrought, $13 to 814 per 
gross ton; No. 1 cast, 813 to $14; stove 
plate, $8 to $9; light iron, No. 2, #4 a ton; 
malleable and steel, $4. 

PETROLEUM. 

A fair business is still kept up. We quote: 
"Silver Star," 15 to 16c. ; " Imperial 
Acme," i6>£ to i7J^c. ; " S.C. Acme," 
18 to 19c, and " Pratt's Astral," 19 to 
20c. 

HIDES. 

Trade is rather dull on account of poor de- 
mand from the tanners. Dealers are paying 
7J^c. for No. 1 light, and tanners are asked 
to pay 8^c. for carlots. We quote : Light 
hides, 7 j^c. for No. 1; 6^c. for No. 2, and 
5>£c. for No. 3 Lambskins, 90c. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, February 1, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

TH E wholesale hardware trade is lacking 
in activity, and the month which has 
just closed has experienced a much 
smaller business than January of 1900. It 
must be remembered, however, that in 
January, 1900, the demand was abnormally 
good on account of the anticipated advances 
in prices in many staple lines of hardware. 
This year the conditions, as far as prices 
are concerned, are the very opposite to 
what they were a year ago. Generally 
speaking, the demand is light both for 
present and for future shipment. Wire nails 
are still quiet and cut nails dull. Very few 
orders of any kind are reported in fencing 
wire. Horseshoes and horse nails are quiet, 
and on the latter prices are lower on account 
of the dissolution of the agreement among the 
manufacturers. Bolts and nuts are meeting 
with a fair demand. In screws, another 
decline, the second for the month, has 
taken place. In cutlery and sporting goods, 
business is still only light. In both tinware 
and enamelled ware trade is small. The 
feature of the trade this week is an improved 
business in screen doors and windows and 




in green wire cloth for future delivery. 
Although prices are being quoted for binder 
twine for future delivery, very little business 
has so far been done. 

Barb Wire — There is no improvement, 
the demand being almost nil for importation 
as well as from stock. We quote $2 .97 
f.o.b. Cleveland for less than carlots, and 
$2.85 in carlots. From stock, Toronto, 83. 10 
per 100 lb. 

Galvanized Wire— On account of an 
idea that no lower prices will be seen, 
retailers are holding back their orders for 
future delivery. In fact, this may be said 
in regard to future business for all kinds of 
fence wire. We quote : Nos. 6, 7 and 
8, 83-55; No. 9. #3-i°; No., 10, 83.75; 
No. 11, 83-85; No. 12, 8325; No. 13, 
83-35; No. 14, 8425; No. 15, 84.75, and 
No. 16, 85. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is a little 
being done in hay-baling wire, but, in oiled 
and annealed, business is practically at a 
standstill. The base price is unchanged at 
82.80 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — The chief business is con- 
fined to orders for future delivery, but, even 
in this particular, trade is small, indeed. The 
base price is unchanged at 82.85 per keg 
for less than carlots and 82.75 in carlots. 

Cut Nails — No improvement is to be 
noted in the demand, the volume of busi- 
ness still being very small. The base price 
is 82.35 per keg. 

Horseshoes — The season is getting 
pretty well over, and business, in conse- 
quence, is light. We quote as follows 
f.o.b. Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, light, medium and heavy, 83.60 ; 



•)•) 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



snow shoes, $3.85 ; light steel shoes, S3. 70; 
featherweight (all sizes), $4-95 ; ' ron shoes, 
No. 1 and smaller, light, medium and 
heavy (all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4 ; 
light steel shoes, $3.95-; featherweight (all 
sizes), $4 95. 

Horse Nails — The feature in this line is 
a decrease in prices consequent upon the 
dissolution of the Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion. The discounts are now : Oval head, 
50, 10 and 5 per cent.; countersunk head, 
50, 10 and 10 per cent. 

Screws— On account of American com- 
petition still another decline, the second 
inside of three weeks, has taken place. The 
discounts are now as follows : Flat head 
bright, 87 j£ and 10 per cent.; round head 
bright, 82^ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent. ; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent. Round head 
bronze is unchanged at 65 per cent., and 
flat head bronze at 70 per cent.. The 
screw trade is fair. 

Bolts and Nuts — The steady trade 
noted in last week s issue continues. We 
quote as follows: Carriage bolts (Norway), 
full square, 70 per cent.; carriage bolts, 
fulls quare, 70 per cent. ; common carriage 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; coach screws, 
75 per cent.; sleighshoe bolts, 75 per cent.; 
blank bolts, 65 per cent.; bolt ends, 65 per 
cent. ; nuts, square, 4^c. off; nuts, hexagon, 
4 3 ^c. ^ tire bolts, 67 yi per cent.; stove 
bolts, 67 % ; plough bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rivets and Burrs — Trade is steady 
with prices as before. Discount, 60 and 10 
per cent, on iron rivets ; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent.; copper rivets and burrs, 35 and 5 
per cent. 

Rope — Very little business is being done. 
We quote : Sisal, 9c. per lb. base, and 
manila, 13c; cotton rope, 3-16 in. and 
larger, i6^c; 5-32 in., 21 y z c, and yi in., 
22j£c. per lb. 

Binder Twine — Although prices are 
being quoted, very little business is being 
done. We quote : Pure manila, io^c. per 
lb.; mixed, %% c. per lb. ; sisal, 7^ c. per 
lb. 

Cutlery — The volume of business in this 
line is still only of a small character. 

Sporting Goods — Business in this line 
continues quiet. 

Green Wire Cloth — Business for future 
delivery has been a little more active during 
the past week. We quote $1.35 per 100 
sq. ft. 

Screen Doors and Windows — There 
has also been an improvement in the 
number of orders in this line for spring 
delivery. 

Mrs. Potts Sad Irons — The market 
for sad irons is somewhat demoralized on 



account of the cutting in prices, and there 
is in consequence a wider range in quota- 
tions than is usual. Some are quoting 
No. 55, polished, at 62 %c, while others are 
trying to get 65c. No. 50, nickel- plated, 
are quoted at from 67 % to 70c. An effort 
is being made to put a stop to the cutting 
that is being done. 

Enamelled Ware — Dealers are only 
buying for immediate requirements and in 
small lots. 

Tinware — A fairly good shipment of 
milk-can trimmings are still being made. 
In other lines of tinware trade is dull. 

Leather Belting — This season has not 
yet opened up and trade in consequence is 
light. Discounts are 60 and 10 per cent, 
on standard, and 60 per cent, on extra. 

Harvest Tools — There is only an oc- 
casional order being booked for future 
delivery. Discount 50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — A light trade 
only is being done. Discount 40 and 5 per 
cent. 

Building Paper— Very little business is 
being done and prices are unchanged. 

Poultry Netting — A little is being done 
for future delivery. Discount on Canadian 
50 and 5 per cent. 

Cement — There is nothing doing. We 
nominally quote in barrel lots : Canadian 
Portland, $2. 80 to $3 ; Belgian, $2.75 to $3; 
English do., $3 ; Canadian hydraulic 
cements, $1.25 to $1.50; calcined plaster, 
$1.90 ; asbestos cement, 52.50 per bbl. 

METAL.H. 

The tin and copper markets have been 
somewhat irregular during the week, but 
local quotations have not been changed. 
The metal trade, taken on the whole, is 
fairly good for this time of the year. Al- 
though the demand is not, perhaps, as brisk 
as it was last week. 

Pig Iron — In consequence of some 
heavy purchases of Bessemer pig iron in 
the United States, a rather healthier tone 
has been imparted to the pig iron market 
generally. In Canada, trade is quiet and 
prices much as before. No. 2 Canadian 
iron is quoted at $17 in 100-ton lots. 

Bar Iron — An active trade continues to 
be done in bar iron. The ruling base price 
is still $1.65 to $1.70 per 100 lb. 

Pig Tin — The outside markets have 
fluctuated somewhat during the week with 
the tendency towards lower prices. Prices 
locally have not been quotably affected, 
the rulling figure still being 32:. per lb. 

Tinplates — The demand has been rather 
more active during the past week, and 
some orders have been booked on importa- 
tion account. Quotations are about 25c. 
lower than they were a week ago. 

Tinned Sheets — Trade has also become 



II A |#Llf The original and only Genuine Pre 
lilt n T I «\ paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
UnlXLI M 6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LINKS 

MANUFACTURERS Or 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 




SCOVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

YANKEE SNAPS. 

Made in all styles and sizes. 

For Sale bv 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 



lSK>- * 




Largert Variety, 

Toilet, H»nd, Electric Power 

ARE THE BEST. 

Bighert Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shewing Machine! 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
aawiaaa Shearer Mt t . Co.. lU.bo.. «.n..l'S. 




The Best Door Closer is . . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRING 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of 
wind. Has many working advantages over tbe 
ordinary spring, and has twice the wear. In use 
throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. Gives 
perfect satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 
Hospital St., - - BIRMINGHAM. 



BURMAN & SONS', LIMITED cuppIrs 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Russia's Stables and Fie d Marshal Lord Roberts. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 

BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B, Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont 



Pullman Sash Balance Co, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester. N.Y.. U.S.A. 

Ob mIc all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



more active in this line, and it can now be 
termed fair. Prices are quoted as before. 

Black Sheets — These are quoted ioc. 
lower, the base price being $3.30 per 100 lb. 
Business is a little better tban it was. 

Galvanized Sheets — Trade is moderate 
ior shipment from stock, and orders are 
being booked freely for spring and summer 
selivery. Jobbers are making delivery from 
the United States for orders booked for 
February 1. 

Canada Plates — Trade in this line con- 
tinues fairly good. We quote : All dull, 
$3; half and half, #3.15, and all bright, 
$3.65 to $3.75- 

Iron Pipe — The demand keeps good and 
prices unchanged. We quote : Black pipe 
% in., $3.00; y % in., $3 00; y t in., #3.50 ; 
% in., $3.20; 1 in., $4.60; \% in., $6.35; 
i^in., $7.55; 2 in., $10.10. Galvanized 
pipe is as follows: ^ in., #4.65; }i in., 
$5.35; 1 in., 5725; i l A in-. $9-75: l *A in -. 
$11.25; 2 > n -> #'5 5°- 

Hoop Steel — Trade keeps fair. The 
base price is unchanged at $3.10. 

Copper — There is ra'.her more inquiry 
for ingot copper, but the volume of business 
is small. A fair trade is to be noted in 
sheet copper. We quote: Ingot, 191020c; 
bo'.t or bar, 23^ to 25c; sheet, 23 t0 23j£c. 

Brass — Business is moderate. Dis- 
count on rod and sheet 15 per cent. 

Solder — The demand is good, with 
prices as quoted last week. 

Lead — Trade is quiet at 4^ to 5c. 

Zinc Spelter — This is still quiet with 
prices unchanged at 6 to 6j£c. per lb. 

Zinc Sheet — Only a few sheets are going 
out. We quote casks at $6.75 to $7, and 
part casks at $7 to $7.50. 

Antimony — There is more inquiry, but 
not a great deal of business is being done. 
We still quote 11 to n^c. per lb. 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

The market is dull. The price of linseed 
oil has fluctuated at outside markets, but 
locally there is no change. Import ship- 
ments, which will be here about July 1, 
are offered at considerably reduced prices. 
Turpentine is stronger in the South, but 
unchanged here. Some orders for paris 
green are being booked, but the trade is not 
large. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.87^; No. 1, $6.50; No. 2. $6. 12^; 
No. 3, $575; No. 4 $5.37 '^; dry white lead 
in casks, $6. 

Red Lead— Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $5 to $5 25 ; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb.; $5. 25 to $5.50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 7 to 7%c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 8 to 8^c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 



84,000 Daily Production. 
5 Factories. 5 Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sale all 
over the World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70% of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 

BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. E stablished 1773 

Manufacturers of Polished. Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 
or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 
Designs on application. 
Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : 107 Cannon Street, London E.C —128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow — 12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par dise Street, Birmingham Telegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens." 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 

GLAZIERS D I A IVI O N OS ^ ReTtebi'e Tools at low prices. 




A. SHAW & SON, 52 Rahere St., Goswell Rd„ London, E.C. Eng. The oldest house in the 

trade, lineal successors of the inventor and patentee, J SHAW. 



Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases. 25c. 

Paris Green — Bbls., 16^0. ; kegs, 17c; 
50 and 100 lb. drums, \J%c.\ 25-lb. drums, 
1 8c. ; 1 -lb. papers, i8^c. ; 1 -lb. tins, i(j]/ z z.\ 
y z Va. papers, 20^c; J^ lb. tins, 2i^c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.20; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.35; bulk in bbls., 
$2 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 lb., 
$2.1$; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $3. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, ioc. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $ 1.20 to $ 1.30 per 
gal.; No. 1 quality, $1 per gal. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 to 
io%c. per lb. and \oyi to uc. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 80;. ; 
boiled, 83c. ; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 79c. ; 
boiled, 82c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, 2c. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 59c. ; 2 
to 4 barrels, 58c, to all points in Ontario. 
For less quantities than barrels, 5c. per 
gallon extra will be added, and for 5 gallon 
packages, 50c, and 10 gallon packages, 
80c. will be charged. 

OLD MATERIAL 

Trade is not brisk, but prices are 
easy. We quote jobbers' prices as 
follows : Agricultural scrap, 55c. per 
cwt.; machinery cast, 55c. per cwt. ; 
stove cast, 35c; No. 1 wrought 50c, 
per 100 lb. ; new light scrap copper, 



12c. pet lb. ; bottoms, io_j£c. ; heavy 
copper, i2}4c ; coil wire scrap, 13c. ; 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10 to 
io^c; heavy red brass, io^c. ; scrap 
lead, 3c. ; zinc, 2j^c ; scrap rubber, 6}£c.; 
good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c; clean 
dry bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 
GLASS. 

There is still no information as to prices 
for import. Stock prices are firm. We 
still quote first break locally : Star, 
in 50 foot boxes, $2.10, and 100-foot 
boxes, $4.; doublediamond under 26 united 
inches, $6, Toronto, Hamilton and Lon- 
don;terms 4 months or3per cent. 3odays. 
PETROLEUM. 

The demand is falling off somewhat. 
Prices are steady. We quote : Pratt' s 
Astral, 17 to 17J4C. in bulk (barrels, $1 
extra) ; American water white, 17 to 
I7^c. in barrels ; Photogene, i6>£ to 
17c; Sarnia water white, 16 to i6}4c in 
barrels; Sarnia prime white, 15 to I5^c. in 
barrels. 

COAL. 

Pea size has advanced 50c. per gross ton 
during the last few weeks. There is still a 
scarcity of nut sizes. Otherwise the market 
is easy, with a sufficient quantity offering. 
We quote anthracite on cars Buffalo and 
bridges : Grate, #4.75 per gross ton and 
#4.24 per net ton ; egg, stove and nut, #5 
per gross ton and $4 46 per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Quotations on tinplates are 25c. lower. 

Wood screws have again been reduced in 
price. 

A reduction of ioc. per 100 lb. is to be 
noted in black sheets. 

New and higher discounts are this week 
being quoted on horse nails. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., are in re- 
ceipt of a shipment of Samson's lumber 
crayons in blue black. The crayons are 
six inches long, by one inch in diameter. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS 

Winnipeg, January 28, 1901. 

BUSINESS remains in practically the 
same condition as last week. Prices 
are firm, but demand in all lines is 
small. In paints and oils also there appears 
to be no change of price. Travellers for 
these lines, however, report better business 
than for hardware. 

Price list for the week is as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb S3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

n 4 00 

12 4 05 

13 4 20 

14 4 35 
'5 4 45 

Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy , keg 3 45 

16 and 20 3 50 

10 3 55 

8 365 

6 3 70 

4 3 85 

3 4 10 

Cut nails, 30 to bo dy 300 

20 to 40 3 05 

10 to 16 3 10 

8 3 15 

6 3 20 

4 3 30 

3 3 6 5 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 05 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 495 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.50 basis. 
Swedish iron, $4.50 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 00 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb... 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 1475 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 75 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb. 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger •. . gio 00 

H 10 50 

}i and 5-16 11 00 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 13 50 

fi 14 00 

\i and 5-16 1450 

Solder 21}* 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 16 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 p.c. 

Flat " brass 70 p c. 

Round " " 60 and 5 p.c. 

Coach 57 'A p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 42 % p.c. 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 50c. lb. 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tooli 50, and 10 p.c. 



Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 125 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, OF., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5P-C. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells: 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

American, M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 75 

Chilled 7 50 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G s 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned. ... 75 and 2K p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



NOTES. 

Over 450 commercial travellers' certificates 
have been issued in Manitoba during the 
present month. 

T. Waldon, for the last 10 years Western 
traveller for Clare Bros., has severed his 
connection with that house and is taking a 
position in the East. , 

I. W. Martin, manager for the Gurney 
Co., has returned from a visit to the East, 
which included Hamilton, Toronto and 
Montreal in Canadian cities and many of 
the leading American cities. 



PETROLEUM. 



Water white American 
Prime white American. 
Water white Canadian . 
Prime white Canadian. 



24 %c. 
23c. 
2ic. 

IQC 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 



Turpentine, pure, in barrels 

Less than barrel lots 

Linseed oil, raw 

Boiled 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor. 

Eldorado engine 

Atlantic red 

Renown engine , 



. % 68 

73 
87 
90 

25 % 
2*14 

41 

Black oil 23^ to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 6i 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. 11 % 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 t° 5° 5 5° 

51 to 60 6 00 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2% 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 25 

No 1 7 00 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, .per gal. #1.30 to J1.90 



THE GREENING CO.'S TRACE CHAIN 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton, 
are placing, this year, on the market a 
trace chain, which their long experience in 
this business convinces them will be appre- 
ciated by their customers, enabling them to 
procure a chain combining the greatest 
amount of toughness with its already well- 
known strength. It i s practically unbreak- 
able with fair usage. 

They have also decided to give their 
customers the advantage of the reduction in 
the price of wire, by giving them a cheaper 
chain, and expect to do a large business in 
this line during the present season. 



The contract for a 1,500,000 bush, elevator 
to be erected at Port Arthur, Ont., has been 
let to J. A. Jamieson, Montreal, by Mac- 
kenzie & Mann. The elevator is to cost 
$350,000, and is to be completed next Sep- 
tember, in time for next season's grain 
crop. The elevator is to be run in connec- 
tion with the Canadian Northern Railway, 
now in course of construction. 



"Anchor" Liquid House Paint. 

Before placing order buyers should get quotations for "Anchor" 
Brand, as there is no better ready-mixed paint in the market. 

It is made from the very best materials, giving maximum body, 
and dries hard with great durability. 

" Anchor " Liquid House Paint is made in a large selection of 
shades for body colors, trimmings, roofs and floors. 

Having made this Paint for over 20 years, we can warrant it to 
give satisfaction to the consumer. 

There are high-priced paints on the market, but none are* 

better than the " Anchor " Brand. 

Sample cards and quotations on application. 

Henderson & Potts 

Manufacturers, 

HALIFAX and MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



THE INSOLVENCY QUESTION. 

THIS week we give two additional 
opinions of Montreal business men, 
on the need of Dominion insolvency 
legislation : 

MR. S. H. EWING'S VIEWS. 

Mr. S. H. Ewing, of S. H. Ewing & 
Sons, Montreal, vice-president of the 
jrolsons Bank and intimately connected 
with many other commercial concerns, is 
quite decided in affirming our need for an 
insolvency law that will cover all the 
Provinces, and is in favor of urging the 
Government to bring forward an insolvency 
measure. 

" Do you consider the chattel mortgages 
of Ontario and the preferences of the 
Maritime Provinces to be unjust in their 
practical workings ? " 

" I consider the chattel mortgages in the 
Provinces where they are legal can and 
have been very much abused by people 
taking a chattel mortgage and not registering 
till a few days before a failure, whereby the 
debtor is able to buy goods, as the seller is 
ignorant of the existence of a chattel mort- 
gage. As to preferences in the Maritime 
Provinces, f consider them immoral and 
dishonest, and that they bring discredit on 
the trade of Canada generally, as it is well 
known that many foreign merchants do not 
care to place their property in the hands of 
parties who at any time can make a prefer- 
ence to any person they wish." 

" Do you think the banks would or should 
object, to the adoption of an insolvency 
law ? ' ' 

"I do not see why the banks should 
object as their interests are the same as 
those of all other merchants." 

" Do you find the winding-up charges 
excessive at present ?" 

"Yes, very excessive in small estates. 
In many cases they eat up everything there 
is in the way of assets." 

" Do you think they should be regulated 
by law ? ' ' 

■' I think that certain charges should be 
taxed at a much less figure than they are 
at present. Referring to the law as it now 
stands, I think with small estates a curator 
should be appointed to wind up the affair 
for a nominal fee or .percentage of the 
assets of the estate." 

LOCKERBV BROS. WANT AN INSOLVENCY 
^ LAW. 

Lockerby Bros., wholesale grocers, Mont- 
real, are another firm that would like to see 
a Dominion insolvency law. They say that 
their losses under the old insolvency law 
were heavier than they are now because the 
assignees managed to absorb the bulk of 
the assets. But they believe that a law, 
such as that which Mr. Fortin suggests, 



would be practical and beneficial, for it 
would place the assets of an insolvent in 
the charge of the creditors who could wind 
up the estate as they pleased. They say 
they find it very inconvenient to be forced to 
keep track of different laws in all the Prov- 
inces, and they believe that a Dominion 
insolvency law should be passed. In their 
opinion the Government will not prove itself 
a business Government unless it takes hold 
of this matter. 



The annual meeting of the Toronto Steel- 
Clad Bath and Metal Co., Limited, will be 
held on Tuesday next. 



Removal Notice. 

ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., 

Paper Makers 

MONTREAL 

have located at 82 McGill Street, and 
are now fully prepared to fill all orders 
that may be entrusted to them, as they 
keep a full stock of material at the fac- 
tory at HOCHELAGA and also at the 
PAPER MILLS at JOLIETTE. 



SEYBOLD, SON & CO. 



FIRE! FIRE! 



Notwithstanding the serious loss we sustained at the big Montreal fire, we 
beg to notify the trade throughout the country that it will not interfere with 
orders being promptly and carefully executed as heretofore. Fortu- 
nately our stock of heavy goods was in another building — please re- 
member this. We had intended locating at 148 McGill Street, 
permanently, but, owing to the warehouse being unsuitable, we have decided 
to rebuild a magnificent warehouse on the old site, St. Paul and Com- 
missioners Streets. Our present address is : 



SEYBOLD, SON & CO., 



18-20 St. Sacrament 
Street, 



Montreal. 



TRADE 




MARK 



JXTobles 8f Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the -works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 





KNOX HENRY, 



Canadian Agent, No. 1 Place Royale, 



None genuine without the 
above "Trade Mark." 

"Gunn's" 

Patent 

"Brassite" 

Goods. 

Equal to Solid Brass in every 
particular. Cost less money- 
look and wear as well. Our 
sales are increasing all the time. 
Why not increase your sales ' 

THE GIN CASTOR CO, 

Limited. 

MONTREAL 



2fi 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



DEFECTIVE FLUES. 

OFTEN we are hustled out of an 
evening by the rushing and clang- 
ing of fire engines, hose reels, etc., 
and the street is turned into a pandemonium. 
For what ? Why, there is a large fire rag- 
ing, and in a few minutes at best a large 
business house or fine dwelling, together 
with its contents, is nothing but a smolder- 
ing pile of ashes and debris. The wise 
chief and long headed inspector are called 
in to hold the inquest. The verdict — What 
is it ? "A defective flue " is the finding in 
the majority of cases. Who is to blame ? 
I answer — custom, old tradition, etc., and 
then the architect, the brick mason, or the 
tinner who constructs it. The architect 
reasons with himself that if he lines the flue 
with tile lining he will have a safe flue. 
That we will admit, if he stays on the 
ground and sees personally every section of 
the lining built in, which, unfortunately, he 
cannot do. The joints between these sec- 
tions are often more unsafe than the naked 
brick flue would be, from the fact that the 
flue is obstructed and the products of com- 
bustion are forced between the outer surface 
of the lining and the inner surface of the 
brick covering, which is more loosely built 
by reason of the lining being present. 

In other instances, the architect specifies 
that the flue must have an area of so many 
square inches and be well plastered on the 
inside. This is the poorest construction 
that could be used for a flue. In the course 
of time, the expansion and contraction, 
under the influence of heat, together with 
the rain beating down into the flue, loosens 
the plastering, and it falls off. If it fell off 
smoothly, there might still be a safe flue ; 
but, unfortunately, this is not the case in a 
single instance. The plastering, in coming 
away from the brick, takes a long section 
of mortar from the joints between the brick. 
Thus, an opening is created through the 
wall of the flue, and the flue leaks and 
refuses to draw. Now is the stage where 
the wise man is called in to remedy the 
trouble. He decides at once that there 
must be a chimney pot put on, made of 
either -rra cotta or sheet iron. He pro- 
ceeds to measure the chimney top, and 
attaches his construction. Let us examine 
and analyze it. 

The flue may be 9x9 in., with an area 
of 81 sq. in.; a chimney pot 8 in. in dia- 
meter has been attached, the area of which 
is 50 sq. in. If the pot is of terra cotta or 
of sheet iron, the same proportion holds 



good. What is the result ? What is this 
wise man trying to do ? Why, he is trying 
to perform something that cannot be done. 
He is trying to force the products of com- 
bustion from a flue having an area of 81 
sq. in. through a chimney top having an 
area of 50 sq. in. In other words, he is 
trying to force a substance through an open- 
ing that is 30 per cent, smaller. Can it be 
done ? I rather think not ! Now this flue 
is in a fine condition for a fire in that build- 
ing. The plaster has fallen off from the 
sides, making openings through the walls 
of the flue, arid the stopping of the free 
outlet at the top crowds the heated gases 
back and they are forced through the walls 
of the flue, in contact with wood or what 
not, and, ergo, away she goes upward in 
smoke. Now if this supposed chimney had 
been pointed by a careful man, this sup- 
posed building could not have been burned 
in a hundred years from that cause. 

The chimney pot, whether it be terra 
cotta or sheet iron, whether it be placed for 
ornament or utility, is the direct cause of a 
majority of fires. Millions in structures 
and goods have gone up in smoke through 
the direct medium of a chimney pot. To 
prove the theory, take a 3 or 4 in. hose 
attached to an engine in operation ; punch 
a hole % in. in diameter in the side of the 
hose. Then put a 1 or 2 in. nozzle on the 
hose and the water will be thrown 20 or 30 
ft. through the X' n - hole. Now take off 
the nozzle and note the result. When the 
water can freely discharge from the full- 
sized opening of the hose very little will go 
through the X m - hole. The action is the 
same in the case of a flue. If the top is left 
off, or one is attached of equal area with the 
opening in the flue, the air will draw inward 
instead of the gases being forced outward. 

A flue should be built square, of good 
sound brick, laid in mortar made of two- 
thirds lime and one-third good cement. The 
brick should be bedded in the mortar and 
the joints struck smoothly, and the chimney 
carried above the highest point of the roof. 
Then there would not be any fires caused 
by defective flues. A flue should be at 
least 25 per cent, larger at the top than it 
is at the point where the smoke enters it. 
This increase should be carried gradually 
from the lowest point to the opening at the 
top ; for example, say from 9 x 9 to 1 1 x 1 1 
or 12 x 12 inches. A half brick might be 
knocked out of the side of a flue of this 
build and it would still be safe from fire. — 
By Caesar, in Metal Worker. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

IT is probable that several fine blocks 
will be erected in Portage la Prairk 
Man., this summer. The Agricultural 
Society propose erecting a $4,000 hall ; R. 
P. Campbell intends building a business 
block ; an addition will be built to the Mer- 
chants Bank ; T. T. Bailey will build a 
business block ; The Northern Pacific will 
probably build a depot there fitted with 
modern conveniences, and J. K. Hill con- 
templates erecting a drug store. It is also 
expected that several residences will be 
built. 

P. Binder, Rodney, Ont., intends erect- 
ing a house on Main street. 

P. Reedy intends erecting a house at 
Kingscote, Ont., this summer. 

W. T. Alexander, near Britton, Ont., 
intends erecting a new house next spring. 

The Presbyterians of Moose Jaw, N.W.T., 
have decided to erect a church to cost 
$8,000. 

Architect Witton is preparing plans for 
another storey to the New Royal Hotel, 
Hamilton. 

Building permits have been issued in 
Toronto to Wm. Howland, for a residence 
at 20 Concord avenue, to cost $1,200; to 
Edward Drew, for a residence on Wilcox 
stieet, near Huron, to cost $3,500; and 
to P. Roach, for additions in the rear of 
325 Queen street west, to cost $2,500. The 
total value of buildings for which permits 
have been taken during January is about 
$40,000, as compared with $109 000 last 
year and $31,800 in 1899. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

Lessard & Harris, Montreal, have secured 
the contract for the plumbing, heating and 
ventilating of Geoffrey Hales' Hospital, at 
Quebec ; the plumbing and ventilating of 
St. Peter's Church, Sherbrooke, and the 
heating and ventilating of Sisters of St. 
Anne's Convent, St. Jacques, Que. This 
firm are busily engaged plumbing the new 
C.P.R. Telegraph building in Montreal. 



THE CONFERENCE IN TORONTO- 

The conference between committees 
representing the Toronto Master Plumbers' 
Association and the Toronto Journeymen 
Plumbers' Union has been more prolonged 
than was anticipated. Several meetings 
have been held, but the agreement has not 
yet been definitely settled. It is believed, 



OUR AIM 



To raise the standard of American Tools. We 
devote our time to manufacturing perfect goods. 
Ask for the Green Book of Hardware Specialties. 
It is full of good things. 

SMITH & HEMENWAY CO. 

296 Broadway, NEW YORK. 




CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
V E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 

TTONTREAL. 

ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
No. I Place Royale, MONTREAL. 



"SECCOTINE" 

FOR STICKING EVERYTHING 







HORSE NAILS — "C" Brand Horse Nails 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS - 

.Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Qunn Castor Co., 




Manufacturers oi 

Heating 
Supplies 

Pipe Fittings and Headers. 
Large Manifolds made to Order. 
Steam Traps and Appliances, etc. 



The . . . 

Jas. Morrison Brass 

Mfg. CO., Limited 

— TORONTO 



c*£c)*mi/e<v 



GWUMZe/ 



u/xwucrr; (Qui. 



STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO. 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS v 



SOLD BY ALL HAR DWAR E 
DEALERS. 



WIRE RODS ! +■ 



Drawn to Decimal Sizes, Cut and Straightened, 
In Uniform Sizes. Prompt Shipment. 



Chalcraft Screw Co., Limited, Brantford, Ont. 

LEADER CHURN 

New Century Improvements. 

FOUR DIFFERENT STYLES: 

A— Steel Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
B — Wood Frame with double reversible Steel Lever. 
C— Steel Frame with Crank. 
D— Wood Frame with Crank. 

Styles A and B may be operatedfrom a sitting 
or standing position. 



Steel Frames and Hoops beautifully ALUMINIZED. 

All LEADER CHURNS are equipped with BICYCLE BALL 
BEARINGS and PATENTED CREAM BREAKERS. 

stands are so constructed that they are particularly strong 
and rigid, and there is nothing to interfere with the 
placing of pail in the most convenient position for drain- 
ing off buttermilk. 

It Pays to Have the Best. None are BetterThan the Leader, 



THE- 



Dowswell Manufacturing Co. 




Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 

Eastern Agents: W. L. Haldimand & Sou, Montreal, Que. 



HOW TO SAVE CAS PeeMes - ^ u 



. TJSE3 . . 



matic Gas Governors 




■gUUIIIIMIli 

Gas, Fire and Stove Governor 






House Governor Burner Governor for Incandescsnts. Mercurial Governor for Fixing at Meter 

Sole Manufacturers, D. BRUCE PEEBLES & CO., Tay Works, Edinburgh, Scotland. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



however, that the ultimate settlement will 
be on the basis that the minimum wage be 
27 J4c. per hour ; a day's work to consist of 
nine hours, and that the number of helpers 
be as hitherto. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

The assets of J. Lafrance&Co., plumbers, 
etc., Montreal, are to be sold on February 7. 

J. Williams, plumber, St. Thomas, Ont., 
has moved across the street to better 
premises. 

ANOTHER BIG BLOCK FOR 
TORONTO. 

William Davies, president of The Wm. 
Davies Co., Limited, who bought the 
property at the corner of Queen and James 
streets, Toronto, known as the Shaftesbury 
Hall, some time ago, has had plans for a 
five storey business block prepared by 
Burke & Horwood, architects, Toronto. 
Tenders have been received from the 
various trades, but contracts will not be let 
for at least two weeks. 



CALCIUM CARBIDE IN GERMANY- 

THE United States Deputy Consul- 
General at Frankfort, writes : " On 
November 30 last, the convention of 
Swiss, Austrian, Swedish, Norwegian, and 
German manufacturers of calcium carbide, 
which was in session at Frankfort, combined 
in establishing price schedules and a mode 
of controlling the sale of their products. 
The Deutsche Gold und Silber Scheide- 
Anstalt, of Frankfort (which has branches 
in the United States and other countries), 
was appointed the sole agent for the sale of 
the syndicate's products. It is expected 
that by this combination the acetylene in- 
dustry will be considerably strengthened. 
The members have adopted measures to 
avoid the fluctuating and ruinously low rates 
which, owing to heretofore existing sharp 
competition, have made the manufacture of 
their products unprofitable. 

"The German acetylene industry is very 
important, there being at present in the 
Empire over 200,000 plants producing this 
gas. New patents for improved methods 
of production are constantly being issued. 
Thirty-two of the smaller towns in Germany 
are lighted by acetylene gas, and a number 
of other plants are in course of erection. 
The gas is also used by the railroads for 
lighting passenger cars. 

' ' This year' s production of calcium carbide 
in Germany is estimated at 20,000 metric 
tons, equivalent to 360,000 hectoliters 
(9,500,000 gallons) of petroleum." 



The assets of Mrs. C. H. Gariepy, 
general merchant, Lachine, Que., have 
been sold. 



THE GLASGOW EXHIBITION. 

THE prospects that the Glasgow Inter- 
national Exhibition will be a 
thoroughly representative affair, 
are excellent. Official support has been 
secured from Russia, France, Austria, 
Japan, Denmark, India, Persia, Morocco, 
Australia and Canada. Though the United 
States will not be officially represented, 
manufacturers from that country have 
taken considerable space, especially in the 
machinery section. Some of the nation- 
alities mentioned above are erecting 
special pavilions in addition to the 
space allotted to them in the main 
building. Russia, for example, is to have 
four, in order to fittingly display mining, 
timber, and other industries. One will be 
reserved for the display of the appurten- 
ances of the Imperial estates, which are 
similar to the British Crown lands, and, by 
arrangement with the refreshment con- 
tractors, there will be a dining room, in 
which dinners will be served in the Russian 
style, with wines, savouries, and other food 
products of the Empire which the Govern- 
ment are anxious to see introduced into 
other countries. 

In the building to be occupied by the 
Japanese will be found a display of arts and 
manufactures, with native artisans at work 
illustrating some of the industries peculiar 
to that country. It will be surrounded by 
a Japanese garden, in itself no small attrac- 
tion. Over 400 exhibitors are expected 
from France, whose section is being organ- 
ized by a committee nominated by the 
French Government. Rhodesia's produc- 
tions will include gold, industrial, and 
agricultural exhibits ; Western Australia's 
display will include gold in various forms to 
the value of between ,£80,000 and ^100,- 
000 ; South Australia deals chiefly in wines; 
while the remainder will stage striking 
examples of their industries and resources. 

In addition to 9,000 square feet in the 
main building, Canada is to have a special 
building, covering about 12,000 square feet, 
placed immediately at the main entrance to 
the grounds, wherein to exhibit minerals, 
manufactures, agricultural products, and 
fruit in season. 

Free transportation will be given by the 
Dominion Government from the point of 
shipment. Exhibitors who do not care 
to have a special representative at the 
Exhibition, which will last from May to 
November, will have their exhibits cared 
for by the officials appointed by the Gov- 
ernment. W. D. Scott, who represented 
Canada at the Paris World's Fair, is the 
Canadian Commissioner at Glasgow. 



Incorporated 1892. 



THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 



President, 
S. F. McKINNON. 

Managing Director, 
ROBT. MUNRO. 

Treasurer, 
HUGH W. AIRD. 

Secretary, 
H. M. PELLATT. 



OIL BOILERS 
LEAD GRINDERS 
COLOR MAKERS 
OXIDE MINERS 
VARNISH 

MANUFACTURERS 
TURPENTINE 

IMPORTERS 

WORKS AT 

ST. MALO 

MONTREAL 

TORONTO 

HEAD OFFICE: 

572 WILLIAM STREET, 

MONTREAL. 



THE 




LIMITED 



SPECIAL 

The Canada Paint Company respect- 
fully announce to their customers that 
the works and offices at ST. MALO, 
MONTREAL and TORONTO will be 
CLOSED and no business transacted 
on Saturday, 2nd February, 1901. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 




e Fairbanks Standard Scale 

Absolutely accurate and reliable . . . 
The best of material and workmanship 

After three-quarters 
of a century— still 

"The — — ■ 
Standard" 

We make scales of 
every description. 

A most complete 
stock a/ways at our 
warerooms. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUES AND PRINTED MATTER. 





The Fairbanks Company, 



749 
Craig 
Street 



Montreal, Que. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LIABILITY ON MINING SHARES. 

OUR readers are well aware that we 
have always taken a firm stand 
against any attempts made by 
Canadian promoters of mining companies 
to sell shares to the investing public in this 
country by offering them at a considerable 
reduction below the face value. They al- 
ways endeavor to assure their purchasers 
that these shares are fully paid and non- 
assessable, irrespective of any disparity 
between the price paid and the face value. 
This custom of selling shares at a discount 
has been so universally in vogue in Canada 
for some years past without the point of 
their non-assessability being called into 
question that one as come to regard the 
statement as one of fact. The recent judg- 
ment given at Rossland, by Mr. Justice 
Walkem, of the Supreme Court, has put 
quite another complexion on the matter, 
and shows that a number of holders of 
these twopenny ha'penny shares, which 
they thought they were picking at a bargain, 
have been living in a fool's paradise. The 
case which has resulted in this important 
decision, is one concerning the Kettle River 
Mines, Limited, capital $1,200,000 in 
shares of $1 each. The company issued 
450,000 of these shares to the owners of the 
property, the promoters taking 495,000 
shares for their trouble, and setting aside 
the balance for the development of the 
mine. 

Regarding the 450.000 vendors' shares, 
these were given for value received, and, 
of course, are properly regarded as paid up 
and non-assessable, but the promoters sold 
1 12,000 of their shares at a few cents each, 
the proceeds of which they apparently put 
in their own pockets, and when they saw 
that they could not sell the shares reserved 
for working capital, and that the shipwreck 
of the company was imminent, they 
endeavored to abandon the remainder of 
the promoters' shares which they held. 
This was owing to a meeting of the trustees 
of the company having made an assessment 
of 2c. per share on the 495,000 promoters' 
shares, which the promoters refused to pay 
and endeavored to divest themselves of 
their liability. In regard to the 112,000 
shares which they had disposed of, the 
holders were sued in order to enforce pay- 
ment of the assessment, but this, the judge 
decided, was not due from them, and he 
summed up the position in the following 
words : 

"If you buy shares at 10c. each on certifi- 
cates which represent them to be of a par 
value of $ 1 each, paid up, direct from the 
company, you must pay the difference be- 
tween the ioc. and the par value, because 
you knew at the time you bought that you 
had not paid their face value. If, however, 



you have bought the same shares in the 
open market, on the same certificates, and 
at the same price, you are not responsible 
for the payment of the difference, as you are 
entitled to rely on the company's statement 
in the certificates that the shares are paid 
up and non assessable." The holders of 
shares in locally- registered Canadian com- 
panies will not have to sort out their certifi- 
cates, and those which they bought direct 
from the company at a discount must be in 
future regarded as only partly paid up. If 
this decision should have the effect of 
making local mining companies postpone 
their operations until there is a reasonable 
amount of cash in their treasury it will have 
a good effect, for the number of abortive 
companies in Canada is enormous, and has 
done much to bring discredit upon mining 
undertakings. — British Columbia Review. 



CORK FOUNDATIONS. 

In Germany, cork is said to have been 
used with success in isolating the vibra- 
tions and consequent noise caused by 
machines installed in or near dwelling 
houses. A sheet made up of flat pieces of 
cork, in mosaic fashion, of corresponding 
size to the bed-plate of the machine, and 
held together by an iron frame, is laid 
under the machine. The source from 
which we gather this information also 
alludes to the isolation, by means of cork, 
of each bolt or connection between the bed- 
plate of the engine and its foundation, but 
does not describe in what manner such 
isolation is effected. It is, of course, 
apparent that the mere sandwiching of a 
sheet of cork between the bed -plate of a 
machine and its foundation would not 
necessarily absorb troublesome vibrations, 
since each anchor bolt is a medium whereby 
the vibrations of the engine may be trans- 
mitted to its foundation, thence to the floor 
and walls of the building unless effectively 
isolated from the same. How this effective 
isolation is obtained by the use of cork sheet- 
ing remains to be explained. For our part, 
we should be more inclined to rely 
upon a specially-prepared foundation of 
extra area and solidarity and to a careful 
balancing of the reciprocating parts of the 
machine. — Kuhlow. 



DOES NOT INTERFERE WITH 
BUSINESS. 

The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Limited, 
beg to notify their customers that the fire in 
their local Montreal city office and sample- 
room does not interfere, in any way, with 
the prompt filling of orders. The staff of 
the local office are temporarily located at 
the general office, 187 Delisle street. Tele- 
phone "Main 3608." 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a wor^ 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
ing cost. 



FOR SALE. 



TINSMITH AND PLUMBING BUSINESS 
' for sale cheap. A splendid opening in a Nova 
Scotia town. Address, Jas. R. Gloster, Moncton, 
N. B. (5) 

AGENT WANTED: 

Y\IE WANT TO APPOINT AN AGENT IN 
* ' Canada to handle our well-known and re- 
liable Glaziers' Diamonds. Good connection with 
the paint and oil branch of the hardware trade 
necessary. A Shaw & Son, 52 Rahere Street, E.C., 
London, Eng. (5) 



Book, Broom 

and 

Mattress Wire 

High Grade, Double Tinned. 






Fine Annealed Brush Wire 
Soft Coppered Wire 
Tinned Wire of all kinds. 



The Peerless Wire Co. 



Hamilton, Ont. 



_ 






THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 

Manufacturers of 
i, 2, 3 Bushel 

Grain 

AND 

Root 

B askets 

THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO. 

Thos. Gebbie & Sons, general merchants, 
millers, etc., Howick, Que., have dissolved. 
Thos. Gebbie & Sons continue the milling 
business and Wm. Gebbie the general store. 







CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




ans&c' 
UNION JACK 

CUTLERY 

We make a specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full lint 

of samples. 

Canadian Orace : 

6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 




CO 

x 
g 



c 

u 

C 

-J 



cm 

CO 



© 



GET THE ORIGINAL 

We lead, others imitate. 

E. T. WRIGHT dc CO. 

Manufacturers. HAMILTON, ONT. 



" JARDINE w 
HAND DRILLS 

Five different sizes to suit 
all requirements. It pays 
to sell the best tools. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 




ItSsN^ 



cepan Handles. \ 



Neatest designs, greatest strength and finest finish of any made. Large stock of all sizes 

constantly on hand, and all orders filled promptly. By the gross, package, or in bu k, as y 

desireL Send for Catalogue. m 

BERGER BROS. CO., - Philadelphia. | 



This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, S552HSi»E- 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 




The Latest and Best 




H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Model 
1900. 



Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 



STEVENS TOOLS 



• IVMVMW Mt\v»VVVVV\V\V 

Make a valuable line for 
tbose interested in such goods. 



Stevens, : Bench «$y 

Surface 
Gauge 



Guaranteed— By a company of 37 years' reputation. 

Fine Sellers— Liberally advertised throughout the 
country. 

Sold to the Trade— We deMre to have our goods 
carrier! ami represented by the trade, and refer all inquiries 
to them. 

GAUGES— A Complete Line. 

This is our Bench Surface Gauge, No. 58. 

List Price, f 2.00. We have 6 other gauges fully described 
in the catalogue. 

Send lor our complete Catalogue of Tools. We have a 
business proposition for the trade. 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO. 

P 0. Box 217, CHICOPEE FALLS, Mass., U.S.A. 

New York' Office, 818 Broadway. 

VVVVVVVWVVV\VV\%A^VVVVVVVVVV\A^A^^^VVVVVVViVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV^A^VV^VVVVVVVVVVVV 

HUTCHISON, SHURLY & DERRETT 




DOVERCOURT 

TWINE MILLS. 



1078 BLOOR STREET WEST 
TORONTO. 



Having equipped our Factory with entirely new machinery, we are prepared 
to furnish the best made goods in the market at closest prices and make 
prompt shipments. 

Hand Laid Cotton Rope and Clotbea Lines, 
Cotton and Russian Hemp Plough Lines, plain and colored. 
Cotton and Linen Fish Lines, laid and braided. 

Netted Hammocks, white and colored. Tennis and Fly Nets. 
Skipping Ropes, Jute, Hemp and Flax Twines. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS MORALITY. 

THERE are men in various positions 
who have few or no compunctions of 
conscience as to the manner of effect- 
ing their designs, though, for the sake of 
policy, they assume a disinterested purpose 
toward their intended victims, says John R. 
Ainslie, a writer in an exchange. Some 
thrive upon the misfortunes and necessities 
of others, and we are not disposed to doubt 
that many shrewd, calculating adepts in the 
practice of morality, from the respectable 
position they falsely occupy in the com- 
munity, escape to quite an extent the 
observation of the public eye and profit in 
their deception. 

I once read of an individual who had 
failed three times in business. The first 
time he was wholly unprepared for his mis- 
fortune ; the second somewhat surprised 
him, but at the third he had become hard- 
ened, and remarked, with a peculiar ex- 
pression of satisfaction, " I had them," 
meaning he had gotten the advantage over 
his creditors. This person kept up his 
respectability for a time, but it was evident 
to those who knew him that his ill-gotten 
gains gave him no peace, and he was not 
able to realize the joy and happiness of 
those who are governed by right principals. 
During the busy hours of the day his mind 
was occupied with the engrossing cares of 
business, but when the shades of darkness 
fell, he was of all men the most miserable. 
On retiring to his chamber he would walk the 
apartment for hours, lamenting his many 
misdeeds and the obligations he had vio- 
lated. 

It is to be regretted that the reputation of 
the dishonest man passes scrutiny for all 
business purposes, and that misrepresent- 
ation and fraud are allowed to pass un- 
rebuked by public opinion. Most men 
characterize such proceedings as "clever" 
and "smart," and the men who are guilty 
of such questionable practices, instead of 
being shunned, are more likely to be 
regarded as desirable customers and com- 
panions, and it is not difficult to point out 
many individuals to-day who have gained 
wealth and position through unscrupulous 
methods and criminal carelessness as to the 
rights or welfare of others. 

Not many years ago, I heard of a man 
who was in good standing in the community 
in which he lived, was known as a large 
dealer in merchandise, paid his bills with 
commendable promptness, securing the 
best discounts, but, invariably, from each 
remittance he would deduct an amount of 
shortages. Goods were doubly and trebly 
checked before being shipped, and every 
precaution adopted to insure correctness. 
Still the "shortages" continued. Then, a 



new plan was devised, and articles were 
enclosed without being charged — not only 
once, but two or three times. Of course, these 
"overs " were never reported. Then, con- 
vinced of his fraud and dishonesty, a bill 
was sent, covering all "overs" and "short- 
ages," with an intimation that an imme- 
diate settlement was not only proper, but 
wise. Needless to say, payment was not 
long delayed. This man, today, is wealthy, 
has retired from business, and passes as a 
respectable member of society. 



GROWING FLAX SEED. 

The Commercial has received a letter 
from Northern Alberta, asking for informa- 
tion about flax seed, and stating that there 
is a movement on foot to grow flax seed in 
that section. The rich land of Northern 
Alberta should be particularly well adapted 
to the production of fUx seed. The crop is 
one which is believed to be particularly well 
adapted to breaking in new land, and as a 
large area of new land will annually be pre- 
pared for crop in Northern Alberta for some 
years to come, no doubt considerable flax 
seed could be produced to advantage. Flax 
can be grown to advantage where wheat, 
oats and barley flourish. There is always a 
good market for flax seed. In fact, there is 
less liability of a depressed market for this 
cotr.modity than for almost any other farm 
product. This being the case, it will un- 
doubtedly be found a profitable crop in 
Northern Alberta, as well as in other grain 
sections of our western prairie country. — 
Commercial, Winnipeg. 



ACETYLENE GAS VS. PETROLEUM. 

U.S. Consul Hughes, of Coburg, under 
date of December 18, 1900, writes as 
follows : 

" Up to the present time, Germany has 
imported each year from $25,000,000 to 
$30,000,000 worth of American petroleum. 
This industry, however, seems to be 
threatened somewhat by the introduction of I 
acetylene as an illuminant, in a convenient 
and safe form, for house, store and other 
uses. This has resulted from the low price 
at which calcium carbide is being produced 
here, and also from the rise in the cost of 
petroleum in the German markets." 



LOOKING FOR A SITE. 

The Sherbrooke, Que., Examiner of a 
recent date notes that the Messrs. Croker, 
a firm of Fitchburg, Pa., paper machinery 
manufacturers, have had an interview with 
the council of the Sherbrooke Board of 
Trade with a view to their locating in that 
town. " They were satisfied," says The. 
Examiner, " with what they saw of Sher- 
brooke, with its fine railway facilities and 
water power. It is not their intention to 
ask for a bonus, but look to the good-will 
of the people in that the price of any site 
they may agree upon would not be raised 
to an exorbitant price." 

The Messrs. Croker are at present visit- 
ing other points in the Province of Quebec, 
but will again return to Sherbrooke. 



R. C. Sharpe, harness dealer, Amherst, 
Ont., is dead. 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 

New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 
Black and Galvanized 
Plain and Painted 
Flat, Corrugated and 
"V" Crimped 

Apollo Best Bloom Galvanized 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Patent Planished Iron 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Refined Smooth Sheets 
Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



<£ 



MIDLAND 



55 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made fsom carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents: 



Orummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 




We Manufacture""^ 

AXES, PICKS 

MATTOCKS, MASONS' 
and SMITH HAMMERS 
and MECHANICS' EDGE 

TOOLS. 

All our goods are guaranteed . 



James Warnock & Co., - Gait, Ont. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



February 1, 1931. 
These prices are for such qualities and 

quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 

prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at betterprices The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 
METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 32 33 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Perboi 

I.O., usual sizes J 6 75 

LX., " g 25 

„ I.X.X.. " 9 75 

Famous— 

J-X 8 25 

LX.X 9 50 

Karen & Vulture Grades— 

I.O., usual Bizes 5 00 

LX., " 6 00 

LX.X " 7 0J 

t.XXX., " 8 00 

D.O., 12%xl7 4 75 

D.X 5 50 

D.X.X 7 50 

Ooke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C. .usual sizes 4 15 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 5U 

20x28 8 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 75 

I.X., Terne Tin 10 75 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
XX. ,14x56, 50sheetbxs) 

" 14x60 " ^ 00? 07% 
•' 14x65, " J 
Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 08 08'/, 

" 26 " 08% 09 

28 " , 09 09% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs 165 170 

Refined " " 2 15 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 05 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 10 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base 2 00 

Tire Steel 2 00 

Machinery iron finish 2 05 

O ast Steel, per lb 00 00 

r e Oalk Steel 2 30 

T. Firth & Cos special cast steel, per lb. 13 

Jesiops Tool Steel 13 

Boiler Tnbes. 

1%-inch 12% 

' " 13 

2<i " 15 

* " 16 

3V t " 20 

* " 25 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

l 4 i "h 2 25 

3-16 inoh 2 2i 

>4 iich and thickt r 2 25 

Black Sheets. 

18 gauge <mo 

20 gauge 3 00 

22to21 " 3 io 

" 3 20 

28 "' 330 

Canada Plate*. 

All dull, 52 sheets 3 00 

Halt polished 3 15 

All bright 3 65 3 75 



, . Iron Pipe. 

Black pipe — 

'A inch 3 00 

% *' 3 0U 

% " 315 

,74 3 20 

\Y* " 6 35 

•% " 7 55 

f„ „" 10 10 

•i'i-o inch, discount 60 p c. 
Galvanized pipe— 

% irjch 4 65 

,% " 5 35 

L ; 7?s 

\& 975 

'% 11 25 

2 15 50 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G O. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16gauge ... 45 4 CO 

18 to 24 gauge 4 25 3 85 4 35 4 25 
26 " 4 50 4 10 4 35 4 50 

28 " 4 75 4 35 4 50 4 75 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 
Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb 

% " 8 00 8 50 

5-16 " " 5 35 5 

% " " 4 35 4 85 

7-16 " " 4 15 4 65 

% " " 4 35 4 50 

" . % " " 3 85 4 35 

% " " 3 8J 4 00 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 4Uand 50 r 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 25 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, die- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dip 
count 40 p.c 

Copper. 

Ingot 

English B. 8., ton lots 19 20 

Lake Superior 

Bolt or Bar. 
Cut lengths round, % to % in. 23% 25 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches 23% 25 

Sheet. 
Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 23 23 

Untinned, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 23 23% 

Note.— Extra for tinning, 2 cents per 
pound, and tinning and half planishing 3 
cents per pound. 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25% 

" 35to45 " " .... 24% 

" 50-lb. and above, " .... 23% 
Boiler and T. K. Pitts 

Plain Tirmed, per lb 28 

Spun, per -lb 32 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 24 25 

Tubing, base, per lb 24 25 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 06 06% 

Domestio " 

Zinc Sheet. 

5 cwt. casks 6 75 7 00 

Partcasks 710 7 50 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 04 3 4 05 

Bar.llb 05% 05>i 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by 06 / 4 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra 



Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 15 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-f t. lengths listB at 7% cents. 
Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1.0 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and bal , $7.50. Dis- 
count, 7% p.c. Prices are f o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized 
on Montreal. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 

Bar half-and-half, guaraot'd 19 ~ 

Bar half-and-half, cjmirer'l 18 l 4 

Refined 18% 

Wiping 18 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities of 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 
Cookson's, per lb 11 11% 

White Lead. Per 100 1^ 

Pure 6 87% 

No. 1 do 6 50 

No. 2 do 6 12% 

No. 3 do 5 75 

No. 4 do 5 3'% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 7 12% 

Brandram'sB B. Genuine 8 00 

" Decorative 7 55 

" No. 1 6 85 

" " No. 2 6 00 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

PureWhiteZinc 08 (9 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 C6'/ 2 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, caska 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. l.casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Paints. 
In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities.per gallon 1 10 

Barn (in bbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 145 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Go's Pure.... 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 
Colors In Oil. 
25 lb. tins. Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow n 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 09 

Colors, Dry. 
Yellow Ochre ( J.C.) bbla.... 135 140 
Yellow Ochre (J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 275 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 1 10 1 15 

Brussels Oohre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), per owt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt. . 1 75 2 00 
Canadian Oxides, per owt., . 1 75 2 00 
Super Magnetic Oxides, 93p c. 2 00 2 2* 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure.... 09 



Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Ocbre 03% 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 1 00 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, per lb .... 07 

Mortar Color, per 1001b 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bulk in bbls 2 00 

Bulk in less quantity 2 15 

Bladders in bbls 2 20 

Bladders in kegs, boxes orlocse 2 ?5 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 45 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 75 

Bladders ia Lu k orlios less than 1001b3 00 
Tarnishes. 
In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No.l 160 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 31 3 70 

Shellao, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 60 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 80 

" No. 1 1 60 2 00 



The Imperial 
Varnish & Color 
Co's., Limited 
Elastilite Varnish 
1 gal. can, each. 
$2.00. 

Granatine Floor 
Finish, per gal. 
$2.00. 

Maple Leaf 
Coach EnamUs ; 
Size 1, £0o ; 
Size 2, 35c. ; Size 
3, 20c. each. 



Linseed OH. 

... . . , ... . Raw. Boiled. 

1 to 4 bbls delivered $0 82 $0 85 

5 to 9 bbls " 81 84 

Toronto, Hamilton, London and Guelph 

iC. I6Sd. 

Turpentine. 

Single barrel, freight allowed ... 59 

2 to 4 barrels " " 58 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb. .0 10 10% 

" small lots 10% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

PureOlive 1 2 o 

" Neatsfoot go 

Glue. 

Common 08% C° 

French Medal 14 1«% 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 1« 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Cooperr 19 20 

Huttne 




34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE ANu METAL 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

Limited 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., MONTREAL 



SOLE AGENTS 

IN CANADA. 




HARDWARE. 

Ammunition . 

Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps. Dom. 50 and S percent.. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. c, Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 n.o. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, " Trap " and 
"Dominion" grades, 25 per cent Rival 
and Nitro, net ist. 

Brass shot Shells, 55 per cent 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb 

Best thick white felt wadding, in 54-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-ib. bags 70 

Beat thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 550 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5 j0 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of l,0u0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 0"25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and K gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzeg. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Per lb 10 12 l / 2 

Anvil and Vise combined .... 4 50 

Wilkinson & Co.'s Anvils, .lb. 09 09V, 

Wilkinson & Co.'s Vices.. lb. 09% 10 
Augers. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 
Axes. 

Chopping Axes- 
Single bit, per doz 6 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 12 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

SDlitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

best, quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zino 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p o. off revised list 
Baths. 
Standard Enameled. 

5%-inoh rolled rim. 1st quality 30 00 

" " " 2nd " 22 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Maznolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo 29 

Special 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse".. 50 

Hells. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per oent. 
N ickel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

Amerioan, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Standard, 60 per cent. 
No. 1 Agricultural, 60 and 10 p.c. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, perpross.... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, full square, Norway... 70 

" " full square 70 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 65 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 65 

Coach Screws 75 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 75 

Blank Bolts 65 

Bolt Ends 65 

Nuts, square 4%c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Plough Bolts 60 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 55 per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 , " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers 'Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 65 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 10 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list 

Oast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 60 and 10 per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per c nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

American, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per oent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nob. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 80 3 00 

Euglish " 300 

Belgian " 2 75 3 00 

Canadian hydraullo 1 25 1 50 



Chalk. 

Carpenters, Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon . per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 percent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns . 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8- 
No. 1, $8.50— > o.2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4. $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 68 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days 

Clips. 

Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets. 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $8 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 8 50 

Fittings 1 ?5 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout 4 75 

Emh. Teutonic Syphon Washout 5 25 

Fittings 1 55 

Low Down T -u'onio, p'ain 14 50 

" " " embossed 15 00 

Plain Richelieu 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu 4 00 

Fittings 1 25 

L^w Down Ont. Syphon J't, plain. . 20 00 

" " emb'd. 20 50 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, round. 14 in 60 

oval, 17 x 14 in 15 1 

" 19x15 in 2 25 

Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 

American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 
Cradles. Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 

Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

" 6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c. ) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 

Coach and Wwon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 

Drills. 

Hand and Breast. 

Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, dis.. 37% to 40 per cent. 

Standard dis. -50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

Faucets 
Common, cork-lined, dis 35 per cent,. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 40 

No. 2, per doz 1 20 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES. 
Black Diamond, 50 and 10 to 60 per oent. 
Kearney & Foote, 60 and 10 p.c. to 60, 10, 10. 
Nicholson File Co., 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

8ize Per Per Per Per 

United 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Inohes. 

Under 26 2 10 4 00 .... 6 00 

26 to 40 2 30 4 35 .... 6 65 

41 to 50 4 75 .... 7 25 

51 to 60 3j ... 8 50 

61 to 70 (a .... 9 25 

71 to 80 5 .... 10 50 



81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86 to 90 14 00 

91 to 95 15 51 

99 to 100 18 00 

GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each.. . 1 65 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, — per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, perlb ... 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 1 50 2 00 

Store door, per doz 100 150 

Fork. 
C. SB., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 100 125 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 7= 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 4u percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns. 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%,10-ft.run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06'/ 9 

5-in., " .... 06'/ 4 
" " 6-in., " ... 16 

8-in., " .... 05% 
" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 60 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 12 in., per 100 lbs 4 50 

14 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 50 

Per gro. pairs 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc. , dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount, 45 and 5 per oent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per oent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, disoount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 
HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand 50, 10 and 5 p.o. . l rl „, u „«; 
"M" brand 50, 10 an 15 p.o. | Oral head. 

Acadian, 50, 10 and 5 per oent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



Use Syracuse Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire. Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



Faotories 



[332 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 
and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller 
Light, medium, and heavy. . 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 
1899. 

ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz J 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun. 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per ih 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.o. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door. japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. ft L. 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and in per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast , per doz 7 50 

No. 3 " Wright's "•. 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 25 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 50 

No. 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

per doz. 

Porcelain lined 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 1 20 1 30 

LINES. 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk ,T 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russell ft Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock. 

English and Am., per doz 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " .... 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flathead discount 25 p.c. 
Round Head, discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', per doz 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz. 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian, per doz 8 50 1 00 

MEAT CDTTER8. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are ; Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 35 $3 85 

3d 3 CO "52 

4and5d 2 75 3 35 

6and7d 2 65 3 20 

8 and 9d 2 50 3 TO 

lOand 12d 2 45 2 95 

16and20d 2 40 2 90 

30. 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 35 2 85 

Galvanising 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 percent 



NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 50 per cent, for McMullen's. 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb 

Navy 6 00 

(J. S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U S ) 16% 

Prime White (U.S ) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White (Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 00 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 1 25 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 50 to 50 and 10 p.c. 
Flaring pails, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Poroelain head, per gross 1 75 3 00 

Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 

PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
o 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 
English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS 

Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Imoression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's wnrk, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 
Jenkins disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 percent. 
Standard valves, discount, CO per per cent. 
Jenkins radiator valves discount 55 per cent. 
" " " standard, dis., 60 p.c 

Quick opening valves discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7. Fuller's 2 50 

No 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1011b. or less 85 

1.C01 lb. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 

PRESSED SPIKEP. 

Discount 25 ne cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 1 00 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 !' 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollnw. ner inch 00 100 

RANGE BOILERS. 

Galvanized, 30 gallons 6 50 

35 " 7 50 

40 " 8 50 



Copper, 30 " 22 00 

•• 35 " 26 00 

" 40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable Canadian list 

50 and 10 p.c. revised list. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RASPS AND HORSE RASPS. 

New Nicholson horse rasp, discount 60 p.c. 
Globe File Co.'s rasps, 60 and 10 to 70 p.c. 
Heller's Horse rasps, 50 to 50 and 5 p.c 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Geo. Butler* Co.'s 8 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile ft Quack's 7 00 12 00 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, discount 60 tnd l n ter cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Black and Tinned Rivets, 60 p.c. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %e 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets ft Burrs. 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
Terms, 4 mos. or 3 per cent, cash 30 days. 
RIVET SETS. 
Canadian, dis. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 

7-16 in. and larger, per lb. 9 13 

%in 10 14 

% and 5-16 in 15 

Cotton, 3-ifi inch and larger 16% 

" 5-32inch 21% 

" Vsinch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope 10% 

RULES. . 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 62% 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 67% 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% per cent. 
B ft A. sand, 40 and 2% per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. ft D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per f t. . . . 35 55 
S. ft D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 CO 

.Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 

.Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALER. 
B. S. ft M. Scales, 45 p.o. 
Champion. 65 per cent. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
11 Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

Chatillon Spring Balances, 10 p.c 



SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., iron, and steel, 85 p. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 81 p.c. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 77% p.c. 
Wood, R. H., " dis. 70 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 70 p.o. 
" R.H. " 65 p.o. 

Drive Screws, 80 percent. 

Bench, wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cir.lery Co . full nickeled, dis. 6D p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 50 and 5 to 50 and 10 p.c, rev. list. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 

STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list. 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 00 00 

Plain 00 3 45 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb, 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador -013 

Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per grosB 3 50 5 00 

Grind, per ton 15 00 18 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

Nestable in crates of 25 lengths. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4—3 dozen in case, net cash .... $4 80 
No. 6—3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Per cent. 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 & 10 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 & 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 83 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 5 

" " tinned 80 & 10 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacka, blued, in dozens only . .75 & 15 

" Yi weights 60 

Swedes, cut. tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 & 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85 ft 12% 

" brush, blued ft tinned, bulk.. 70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 ft 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52 



36 



CANADfAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties, etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, „ j- t» * *• A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

Mortal ' -Canadian Representatives- Montreal 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Trunk nails, blac* 66 ana 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued and tinned. . . .65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Cigar box nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tackB, papers 90 and 10 

bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin, per doz... . 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 
TRANSOM LIFTERS. 

Payson '8 per doz 2 60 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, dis. 25 p c. 
Game, H. &N.. P. S. & W., 65 p.r. 
Same, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 



TROWELS. 

Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D. , discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, per lb 22 26 

Wrapping, mottled, perpack. 50 60 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 20 

" 4-p!y 26 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 

Broom, " 30 55 

VISES. 

Hand, per doz 4 00 6 00 

Bench, parallel, each 2 00 4 50 

Coach, each 6 00 7 00 

Peter Wright's, per lb 12 13 

Pipe, each 5 50 9 00 

Saw, per doz 6 50 13 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 
Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 

days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, base, $2.80 per 100 

lb. List of extras : Nos. 2 to 5, ad- 



vance 7o. per 100 lb.— Nos. 6 to 9, base- 
No. 10, advance 7c.-No.ll, 14c— No. 12. 
20c— No. 13. 35c— No. 14. 47c— No. 15, 
60c— No. 16, 75c. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, Sp- 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
— spring wire, $1 — best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net, 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c. — 
bagging or papering, 10c. 
ine Steel Wire, dis. 17Vs per cent 
List of extras : In 100-lh. lots : No. 
17, $5-No.l8, $5.50-No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
$7.65-No. 24, $8-No. 25, $9-No. 26, 
S9.50-NO. 27, $10-No. 28. $11— No 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13-No. 31,$14-No. 32, $lf 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil 
ing, 10c. — in 25-1K bundles, 15c— in 5 ana 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6, 7,8,$3.P5 
No. 9, $3.10-No. 10, J3.75-No. 11, $3 85 
No. 12, $3.25-No. 13, $3.35-No. 14, 
$4.25-No. 15, $4.75-No. 16. $5.C0. 

Clothes Line Wire, 19 gauge, 

per 1,000 feet 3 30 



WIRE FENCING. F.O.B. 
Galvanized 4 barb, 2% and 5 Toronto 

inches apart 3 10 

Galvanized, 2 barb, 4 and 6 

inches apart 310 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 10 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 97% 

in less than carlote, and $2.85 in carlots. 

Terms, 60 days or 2 per cent, in 10 days. 
Ross braid truss cable 4 5U 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . 1 35 
Terms, 4 months, May 1. ; 3 p.c off 30 days. 

WRENCHES. 
4cme, 35 to 37V, per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. & K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $ 

Royal Canadian " 50 00 

Royal American " 50 00 

Discount, 45 per cent. ; terms 4 months, or 3 
p.c. 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 




THE AUER 
GASOLINE 
LAMP 



No. 9, 
200 Candle Power 



Suitable for 

STORE, 

RESIDENCE 
OR CHURCH. 



The only Lamp on the Canadian market which 
is guaranteed not to clog, flicker or smell. 

YOUR MONEY BACK IF NOT ENTIRELY SATISFIED. 



For Catalogues and Prices on Lamps, Mantles and Sundries, 
write 

AUER LIGHT CO. 

1682 Notre Dame St., MONTREAL. 

E. SIMPSON & CO., Moose Jaw, Agents for the Territories. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Slsat Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shlngleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD'' Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 



Western Ontario Representative — 

WM. B. STEWART. 
Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



* ■ Limited 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen tneir advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



SENE for specimen copy of Phillips' Monthl Machinery 
Register, containing over 5.000 entries of new and 
second-hand machinery of every description. The oldest 
established and most successful medium in the world. 
Established 25 years for the purpose of introducing those 
who have machinery for sale, to tho.e who wish to buy, has a 
circulation of about 50,000 copies per annum, all over the 
world and is used for continual reference by a lar^e number 
>f firms. It is consequently a most valuable advertising 
medium for all engineers and manufacturers. Subscription , 
6s per annum, price per copy, 6d. Sole Proprietor, Chas. 
D.' Phillips, M.IM.E., Newport, Mon., England. Tele- 
graphic address "Machinery, Newport, Mon." 



Incorporated 
1851. 



WESTERN 

H ASSURANCI [PANY 

Fire and Marine 

Capital, subscribed $2,000,000.00 
Capital - - - 1,000,000.00 
Assets, over - - 2,340,000.00 
Annual Income - 2,290,000.00 

Head Office: TORONTO. ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. J J. Kenny, Vice-President. 
C. C. Foster, Secretary. 



Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 



Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from , and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject," 

CANADIAN PRESS~CUPPING BUREAU, 

2 2 MCGill Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 12SS. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 

Trimmers, Scissors, 

Tinners' Snips, etc. . CKH0WlED6ED THE BEST . 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SK^a' ^" 8 '' 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 
..ESTABLISHED 1840— 



Capital and Surplus, $1,600,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, ff.'S, 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN. N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE 
TORONTO, ONT. 



TH0S. C, IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto, JOHN A. FULTON, Gen, Man, Eastern Canada, Montreal, 



Awarded a Gold Medal at 
PARIS EXPOSITION for 

superiority. That's proof 
enough of their quality, and 
clearly shows that they are 
the best. 



The Bailey 



Send for Catalogue 
and .... 
Price List. 




Cutlery Co. 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 




Dominion Pattern 

Cow He •Stall Fixture 

The special features of the tie and stall fixture are well 
shown in the illustration. As will be noticed the chain is 
very short, which prevents all danger of entanglement with 
the animal's foot. At the same time the form of the fixture 
is such that great freedom is allowed to the head. Because 
of the short chain this tie is much cheaper than the ordin- 
ary patterns. 

The stall fixture is made from a tough quality of steel 
and is very strong. Also, owing to its circular cross-section, 
it is exceedingly rigid. Its simplicity, convenience, cheap- 
ness, and ease of attaching make it very popular with cow 
tie users. 

This form of tie and stall fixture are sometimes called 
Niagara pattern . 

American or Flat Link Chain, 

for years the standard cow tie chain in "the States. 
is now rapidly coming in favor in Canada. Its 
short link, handsome appearance and smooth sur- 
face — which cannot injure the animal's neck — make 
it superior to all other styles of chain for cow ties. 

For sale by all Jobbers ; manufactured by 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited, "'"'*§$/*'-'-*• 



r 

!! 



*%*%^%s%*s+%'%s*^%**>%wii%^%/%*,* 



Eat. 1868 




Inc. 18S6 



I'- 
I 

I 1 
l> 

,1 

l> 
| I 

It 

I 

I' 

|l 

I I 

l> 

I* 

i! 

i" 
i» 
i> 

i k 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




Awarded 

By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




1901 





E. '901 



>^>^%%^^%^t>^t>%^f>%%%^^tvf>%^^fvfvfv%^ 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms 
49-61-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO, C anada. 

Factories -1 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Tin Plate 
Company, 

Battery Park Building, New York City. 

Manufacturers .-— ^i^»- 

TIN PLATE 
TERNE PLATE 



and 



BLACK PLATE. 



B.SS. H.THOMPSONS COY 

26 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 

Sole Agents for Dominion of Canada. 



Cost does not end 

with buying 

There's the working to be considered. 
Imperfect material means imperfect 
work and — dissatisfaction. 

Best Best Poplar brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

Always turn out well, smooth, 
even, soft and workable. 

Galvanized Corrugated sheets 

"BLACKWALL" BRAND 



-vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvw* %/ww 



BLACKWALL GALVANIZED IRON CO. 



LONDON, ENG. 



..Limited 



Canadian Agents, J. WATTER80N & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Stands Comparison. 

LANGWELL'S BABBIT, Montreal 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, FEBRUARY 9, 1901. 



NO. 6 



"TANDEM" ANTI-FRICTION METAL. " 



"Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other for their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 



Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saying. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 

A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH * McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of A nti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




Black Sheets. 



Lysaghts "Best" and "Southern Cross" 

Steel Sheets are second to none for quality 
and finish. 

"Dead Flat" and "Electrical" Sheets 

a specialty. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, 
MONTBEAL. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, limits* 



>L*& 



" r P A K The Safford Radiators for Steam 

1 U L " L-n,V or Hot Water Heating have no 

joints, because the makers of the Radiators do not believe that it's 
the mission of a Radiator to leak. Joints require rods, bolts and 
packing, which are the promoters of leaks. 

s^ The connections of the Safford Radiators are made by screw 
nipples which make them absolutely unleakable. And, too, the 
"Safford" is the original invention in screw nipples, hence, best by 
the longest test. Think of the money loss that leaky Radiators 
entail. Save that money and win the good-will of a customer by 
installing the "Safford," which is made by the largest Radiator 
Manufacturers under the British flag. Send for our free booklet 
telling all about it. 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited 

Toronto, Ont. 



PLUflBERS' 

AND 

STEAMFITTERS' 



P VALVES 

| FITTINGS 

P TONGS 

E WRENCHES 



TOOLS 



ALL 

KINDS 

OF 



PIPE 



STOCKS 

AND 

DIES 



RIGE LEWIS & SON 



Limited. 



Cor. King and Victoria Streets, 

TOPOMTO 



m NEOSTYLE DUPLICATORS 

Print from 100 to 5,000 original hand and typewritten 
circulars, at less cost than printing, jfi jfi & jfi jt 



WRITE FOR FULL PARTICULARS. 



Rebuilt Typewriters £. $I5 00 to $50 00 ::*. 

Typewriters Rented — $2.50 to $5.00 per month. 
Repairing on all makes a specialty. Write for prices. 



CREELMAN BRO'S TYPEWRITER CO. 



Sole Dealers in 
Underwood Typewriters. 



15 Adelaide St. East, - TORONTO. 

97 St. Francois Xavier St., MONTREAL. 
28 King St. West, - HAMILTON. 

Temple Building - - LONDON. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Garden Hose 




Discounts for the new season 
now out. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 

www 

CANADIAN RUBBER CO., 



Montreal. 



Toronto. 



Winnipeg. 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



SOME OF THE NEWER "YANKEE" TOOLS 




No. 15 "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT AND LEFT HAND, AND RIGID, WITH FINGER TURN ON BLADE— 2, 3, 4 and 5-in. BLADES. 




• No. 20 " Yankee " Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver 

RIGHT HAND ONLY, AND RIGID. 3 SIZES, EXTREME LENGTH OPEN, INCLUDING BIT-14, 17 and 19-inches 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
throughout the Dominion. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO, 

Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




KITCHEN RANGE BOILERS-GALVANIZED 



44 



APOLLO 



** 



Made of Apollo Open Hearth Steel, 
severely tested at 200 lbs. before galvan- 
izing (making tightness doubly sure) and 
are perfectly galvanized inside and out. 

25, 30, 35, 40, 52 GALLON. 

PRICES ON APPLICATION. 




The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



GALVANIZED SHEETS 

" Gordon Crown" Brand 



From stock or importation. Enquiries Solicited. 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, 



LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington Street West, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SKRT 




i# 



also UNION 



^TARR MFG. COS 
, standard lines of 
Acme and Hockey Skates 

E CO'S Hockey- 



Toronto Office: 

32 Front St.,West 

H. T. Eager. 




Branch House: 

George D. Wood 
& Co., 

Winnipeg. 



6B# 



LADIES' SKATE WITH LEATHER ANKLE SUPPORT. 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



"O 



Wood, Vallance & Co., - Hamilton 

"PLYMOUTH" TWINE 



wvwwwwwwwwwr 




/WWWWlfWWWWV 



has effectually, and in ever increasing magnitude, won its 
way to the Very top notch of 

Binder Twine Perfection 

It is the noblest twine of them all, and its unequalled 
reputation for absolute uniformity makes it easier to sell than 
any other brand. 



"PLYMOUTH" is the acknowledged twine standard. 




Plymouth Binder Twine Agency, McKinnon Bldg., Helinda St., Toronto, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Best Selling 
Range Ever Made. 

Popular with dealers in every part of the country ■»., 
— -because it is so enthusiastically praised by 
every buyer. 

Our Imperial Oxford 

has won its laurels — it is the favorite range of 
Canada — widely advertised, and everywhere ap- 
preciated for its practical superiority. 



Are you familiar with its 
Diffusive Flue Construction 
Front Draw=Out Grate 
Draw=Out Oven Rack 

and other talking points 



> 



If there's any range business in your locality you'll 
get it by handling the Imperial Oxford. Fullest details 
if you write 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 




IBi 
THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL 



David Maxwell & Sons 




Steel Frame. 



MAXWELL MOWER! 

8-inch Low Wheel. 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA 



* Maxwell Favorite Churn " Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever Drive, 
and Detachable Driving Link Improved f.or sea- 
son of 1901. Steel or Wood Frame as desired, 



High and Low Wheels, 
from 12-in. to 20-in. 
widths. Cold Rolled 

Steel Shafting, Crucible Steel Kniyes and Cutting 

Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four different 
Sizes. 



these articles 



.SEND DIRECT TO US. 



"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



EVERYTHING GOOD AND, PROFITABLE IN WALL PAPER. 




21-inch Ingrain Frieze, No. 2030. 




*fr • . •** >£» J& jtf* J£* fi £± „>•&' ..^ ,4, #& Jfr Jfa. 

21-inch Ingrain Frieze, No. 2043. 






A*o 



THE ABOVE ARE TWO OF MANY SUCCESSFUL FRIEZES 
IN OUR 1901 COLLECTION > * * j, 

IF OF INTEREST WE WILL MAIL SMALL BOOK OF 
INGRAIN SHADES WITH ILLUSTRATED MATCHED 
COMBINATIONS, OR SAMPLES OF ABOVE OR OTHERS 
IN ANY DESIRED SHADE * * j> j> ^ 



Feb. 1st. 



the WATSON, FOSTER CO., limited 

MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE NEW BALDWIN t 

DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 



CE.Y'.'Ml'."-'.".V W/.'.'.',.Vi>; I .'J.JiAi'iWEEEW 




BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation- 
Sanitary— Odorless. 
Latest Cleanable Fea- 
tures — The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Locks 
Ball-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Bubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 



Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the Eas 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; specia 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



EXTENDED 
INSURANCE. 






One of the many liberal features embodied in the 
UNCONDITIONAL ACCUMULATIVE POLICY 

issued by the 

Confederation 
Life Association. 

HEAD OFFICE-TORONTO. 

is the provision for Extended Insurance. After three full annual premiums. 
have been paid, the insured is entitled to Extended Insurance for the full 
amount of the policy for a term of years definitely stated therein. Paid-up 
and Cash Values also guaranteed. 

Rates and full information sent on application to the Head Office, To* 
ronto, or to any of the association's agents. 



W. C. Macdonald, 

Actuary. 



J. K. MACDONALD, 

Managing Directot 





We are starting outwhe yyar with jQpCery large line of new goods. If you are not a cus- 
tomer of ours now, we t^unk-flf will pay you to become one. 

We are Not iif^he Truster members of any Silverware Association or Combine, which 
means that we ra-akerour own prices and terms and are not in any way dictated to by others. 

If yojA haAJb not revived a copy of our last Catalogue, and would like one, please write 



Y 



E. G. Gooderham 

Managing TM rector. 



The Toronto Silver Plate Co., Limited, 

Silversmiths and Manufacturers of Electro Plate, 

Factories and Salesrooms, King St. West, Toronto, Canada. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal. 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



~&W2r /!fa/v/&m- - o( -{a/tans' 






/-> tjlT f/lr fl/>A>A'ai-&r>ti 



DUNDAS AXES 



ARE 



American in Sharpness, 
Canadian in Reliability, 

JUST WHAT YOU WANT TO SELL. 



Dundas Axe Works 

DUNDAS, ONT. 
MONEY 

OR 

SENTIMENT? 



toio 



1 CrjiUUn Sullirj III Tusk. 



THE MURALO CO.TPANV. 



Will you stick to old fashioned 

WALL TINTS 

for sentiment, or will you go in for the latest and 
best for money ( 

-MURALO 

is the latest and best, because it is up-to-date and 
no old fashioned notions about it. Advertising 
plans are up-to-date, and dealers are backed up 
by one of the stronge t financial institutions in 
America to assist in selling. Mural o goes to every 
country in the world. 

AGENTS: 

A. RAMSAY & SON, MONTREAL. 

J. H. ASHDOWN, WINNIPEG, 

McLENNAN, McFEELY L CO., - - VANCOUVER. 



MERCHANTS OF CANADA 

Especially dealers in paints and wall-coatings ! When you took account of stock at the dawn of the new 
century, did ycu find in store some goods that you had been induced to buy, and for which there is absolutely no 
demand? Possibly some that you carried over from i8go? Musingly, did you exclaim, " I got fooled when I 
bought these goods, but it was the fault of the man or firm who sold me ; if I get fooled the second time, it will 
be my fault ! " 

The moral of it all is . — Buy goods that are manufactured by men with experience in their particular line, 
and in whom the people have confidence ; who advertise their product, guaranteeing it as represented, and whose 
goods sell on their own merits. 

Why put in stock, that in order to sell, you have to tell your customers is "the same thing " or "just as 
good " as something else ? CHURCH'S 

ALABASTINE 

the permanent wall-coating, t rjeady for use by mixing with cold water, is in demand everywhere. Is sanitary to 
the highest degree. Has a record of value, and proof of origin. 

ALABASTINE for more than a quarter of a century has been prominently before the people. Anyone 
can brush it on— no one can rub it off. 

ALABASTINE is the acme of perfection in wall-coating material, either for plain tinting, or the 
most elaborate work known to the decorator's art. Is adapted to all kinds of relief work, and is a special 
favorite with practical men. 

ALABASTINE is manufactured in Canada. Patented in this and other countries. Do you sell it ? If 
not, why not? Write for prices. ' 



Address, THE ALABASTINE CO., LIMITED, Paris, Ont. 



The trade supplied by — 

Sanderson Pearcy & Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Q. P. Stephens & Co., Winnipeg, Man. 



Vancouver Hardware Co , Vancouver, B.C. 
< Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
William Hill, Montreal, P.Q. 



The attention of Contractors, Builders and Building Owners is called to our PARI STONE Wall Plaster, and 
SHIELD BRAND Calcined Plaster. None better. 




VanTuyl & Fairbank 



Petrolla, Ont. 

Headquarters for . . . 

Oil and Artesian Well 
Pumps, Casing, Tubing, 
Fittings, Drilling Tools, 
Cables, etc. 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 
PARIS 
ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 




"DAISY" CHURN <* 

Has tempered steel cased bicycle ball bearings, strongest, neat- 
est and most convenient frame. Only two bolts to adjust in 
setting up. Steel Bow Levers, suitable for either a standing or 
sitting posture. Has four wheels and adjustable feet to hold 
stand steady while churning When churn is locked to stand 
the bow can be used as handles to move it about on the front 
wheels as handy as a baby carriage. Open on both sides to 
centre, giving free space for pail. Made with wood or steel 
stands, with Cranks only, or Bow Levers as desired. 

Vollmar Perfect Washer 

Has a most enviable record. A 
perfection of its kind— will wash 
more clothes in less time, do it better 
and easier, with less wear and tear, 
than any other machine. 



THE. 



fataii 4 Waid Mfg. Co., 




Limited 
LONDON, ONT 

Eastern Branch, 60 McGill Street, Montreal, Que, 




Wire Guards 



FOR 

Store Fronts 

Factory and Mill Windows 

Basement Windows 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., limited 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 





WARE AND METAL 



THEY ARE SATISFA* 




CAST 

Sap Spouts 

These do not buckle and pull out of the 
trees if the wind bloi 

xJrySjnder Di^/tmvniof 




RFEGT" 



§F\ ifcLOTHES LINE HOOK. 

v * Mofektjjfe line without a knot. The more weight hung on line, 
ype tngMer \{t binds. Clothes lines can be put up or taken down 
<Jiin ag insta/t. 



Manufactured 

by. 



dv< 



ORDER A SAMPLE FROM YOUR JOBBER. 



A. R. Woodyatt & Co., Guelph, Canada. 



SUGAR 




n 



DD 






«r= 



Sap Buckets. 





Extra deep and straight. Three sizes. They possess many 
advantages over the Ordinary Flaring Buckets — being small 
in diameter they do not catch the rain or snow, and, as they 
are very deep, they hang perpendicularly, and, consequently, 
will not overflow until full. Covers supplied if required. They 
nest close for shipping or storing. 

We can supply the Ordinary Flaring Sap Pails, 

E. T. Sap Spouts. 

Strong and Durable. Only re- 
It does not cover the inside sur- 
face of the hole, therefore, a larger amount of Sap is obtained. 

Maple Leaf Sap Spouts. 

Made in Bronzed Steel. Require a M-in. hole. Has a 
shoulder which prevents it being driven in too far. The hole 
in the tree is not exposed to wind and snow, consequently, 
sap will flow longer. 




Made of Retinned Steel, 
quire a 5^-in. hole in a tree 



Sprup Cans. 



Plain or Decorated. Made in 
Either Wine or Imperial Measure. 



}4, % and i gallon sizes. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co., 



1^* 



Toronto, 



Canada. 




VOL. XIII. MONTREAL AND TORONTO, FEBRUARY 9, 1901. NO. 6. 

President, A. R. Woodyatt & Co., Guelph, received a TROUBLE OVER RAILWAY REBATES. 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. large order from Germany, and the same IN every country there are people who 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. company is just shipping a carload of pride themselves that in this or that par- 

Limited. mowers to Edinburgh. ticular their own land is not like other 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- What the British market demands as a lands. Not infrequently something happens 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 

Rec^c 1 ^ rule . is g° ods of reliable <l ualit y- At which knocks their ideal to the ground. 

island and Newfoundland. present, Canadian products of many kinds For instance, it has been popularly sup- 

OFFIOEa . . 

Montreal a 3 i McGiil Street, stand high in public favor there. And our posed in Great Britain that that country was 

TORONTO io Frolt'ltreet'East; lawn mowers promise to eventually become not as other countries in regard to railway 

London, end. - - - - tog Pi™it?clt? e.£\ so. freight rebates. Rebates might be given in 

J. M. McKim. . TT . , „ , . 

Manchester, eng. - - - 18 St Ann street. the United States and other countries, but 

WINNIPEG .... Wester H n-cln A ad| b S; SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT. not in Great Britain. 

ST. JOHN, N. b. ... no. 3 Markefwharli ^^yUIET seasons in business should be If we are t0 jud (rom t exposures 

I. Hunter White, f 1 .,..., . , jb rt 

new york. , 7 6 E. 88th street, II times of active thinking on the the Mother Country is by no means so free 

S°rM?& C :?^^ P art of hardware - as wel1 as °- n of the evil as it imagined. And if what 

Pubii.hed every Saturday. the part of other merchants. some of the London papers say be true, the 

cable Address { Adscript', Canada". It is when there is little doing that the evil is of an aggravated, not of a mild type. 

— — — — — — opportunity comes for preparing plans of The Midland Railway Company, it 

campaign. In the height of business activity appears, is the chief sinner. According to 
there is not much time for consecutive a secret rebate agreement between the rail- 
thought and careful planning, and when way and Rickett, Smith & Co., the latter* 
opportunity comes for doing so it should be were to be allowed 1 % per cent, on all 
grasped just as opportunities should be sums paid by them to the former for the 
OUR LAWN MOWERS IN ENGLAND, grasped for securing customers. carriage of coal. 

IN a quiet and unobtrusive way Canada is A subject which retail hardwaremen might The coal factors and merchants, who 

building up a nice export trade in lawn discuss during the present quiet season is claim to have for some time suspected the 

mowers of domestic manufacture. the formation of associations. There is now existence of such an agreement, are up in 

Canadian-made lawn mowers are of a high but one retail association in Canada, arms, and the coal men, other than the firm 

standard and should sell well abroad, but, namely, that in Montreal, whereas there which has been enjoying the special privi- 

like everything else, they need to be should be a dozen or two at the least. leges, are demanding retrospective compen- 

' ' pushed ' ' on the foreign market as well as Many of the associations across the border sation. 

on the lawn. This, fortunately, they have have been holding their annual conventions The Society of Coal Merchants has 

been, and the result is a growing export lately, and one cannot regret, when one "solved to take action against the railway, 

trade. rea( j s the reports of the many interesting and as the stake involved it over $2,400,- 

Unfortunately, lawn mowers are not meetings, that there are not more of such 00 ° a g° od deal of interest is naturally 

classified in the trade returns. Consequently. educative institutions among the retail hard- excited. 

the extent of the growth cannot be demon- waremen of Canada. Tne railway company pleads justification 

strated by figures. Think about these things. on the ground of the enormous through 

The chief market at present is Great traffic which the Rickett Co. furnishes, but 

Britain, but a trade is being developed with He who would be successful in business this is no solace for those who have been 

some of the continental countries of Europe, should study not only the methods of others, placed at a disadvantage on account of the 

Only this week one Canadian manufacturer, but should experiment with ideas of his own. rebate. 



WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE MENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE SITUATION IN MANITOBA. 



WHILE one cannot ignore the fact that 
the partial failure of the wheat crop 
in Manitoba entailed a loss to the 
people in that Province, yet it is not suffi- 
ciently heavy to retard the steady develop- 
ment of that part of the Dominion. If it 
were it would be a reflection on the natural 
advantage possessed by the Province about 
which it has been our wont to boast. 

It is only right and proper that business 
men should be guided by the conditions as 
they exist in Manitoba and cut their gar- 
ments, financially speaking, according to 
their cloth. But care, on the other hand, 
is necessary in order that we do not fly to 
the other extreme. This we may possibly 
do if we overlook certain compensating 
factors. The wheat crop of Manitoba last 
year was undoubtedly much smaller than 
for several years. As the president of the 
Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange 
remarked in his recent annual report, in 
size it was closely pressed by that of 1887, 
when the yield was 12,350,000 bushels. 
But, while the crop was small, a good deal of 
it ranked high in quality, no less than 70 
per cent, of the wheat inspected at Winni- 
peg being No. 1 hard, the highest per- 
centage recorded. Furthermore, there is 
the testimony of millers who used last year's 
Manitoba wheat in their mills as to its 
excellent flour-producing qualities. 

Then, it must be remembered that the 
dairy and live stock industries are expand- 
ing in a most substantial manner, so that 
the farmer in Manitoba is becoming less 
dependent upon grain producing as a source 
of revenue, although it will always probably 
be the chief source of money supply. 

Although the partial failure of the Mani- 
toba wheat crop last year no doubt meant 
a great loss to the farmer, it does not 
appear to have crippled him. This is 
evident from the reports of the loan com- 
panies doing business in that Province. 
One of them, the Canada Landed & 
National Investment Co., Limited, in its 
annual report, which was issued a few days 
ago, says that, notwithstanding the disap- 
pointing harvest in Manitoba, " payments 
by borrowers have been met very good 
indeed." And then it adds : "Manitoba 
is beyond any doubt a great and valuable 



Province, into which an industrious and 
frugal population is flowing steadily, and 
will become one of the greatest sources of 
the world's supply of wheat and flour, and 
dairy products as well." 

In the annual report of the Winnipeg 
Grain and Produce Exchange, already 
referred to, Mr. William Martin, the presi- 
dent, estimates that this spring over 2,000,- 
000 acres will be under wheat in Manitoba, 
and 500,000 acres in the Territories, "so 
that," he adds, "50,000,000 crop is no 
flight of the imagination." 

Mr. Martin may be a little high in his 
estimates, but from what we can gather 
1901 will see a much larger wheat acreage 
in Manitoba than last year. The acreage 
in Manitoba last y«ar was 1,800,000, but, of 
course, the unusual drought prevented the 
Province from securing a crop that, under 
ordinary circumstances, would have approxi- 
mated to it. In 1887 the acreage was only 
432,134, and yet the yield was about as 
large as that of 1900. 



when it is believed the furnace of the 
Cramp Company at Collingwood will be in 
blast. 



ANOTHER BLAST FURNACE IN 
OPERATION. 

ANOTHER step forward was taken 
in the iron industry of Canada on 
Saturday last when the charging of 
the first furnace of the Dominion Iron and 
Steel Co. at Sydney, N.S., took place. 
This furnace, which is 90 feet high and 18 
feet in diameter, was charged with 400 tons 
of Belle Island ore, 225 tons of coke, and 
125 tons of lime. 

This is the first of four blast furnaces 
which the company is to shortly have in 
operation. The capacity of each furnace is 
250 tons per day. The estimated cost of 
the blast furnaces is $2,500,000. Besides 
these a steel mill is to be constructed at a 
cost of $ 1, 500, 000 and coke ovens at a cost 
of about $1, 250,000. It is expected that the - 
full battery of furnaces will be in operation 
a couple of months hence. 

There are now two blast furnaces in 
operation in Nova Scotia and six in the 
whole of the Dominion, there being, besides 
the two already mentioned, three in Ontario 
and two in Quebec. It is expected that 
Ontario will have a fourth by October next, 



THE TOURIST QUESTION IN NEW 
BRUNSWICK. 

THE annual meeting of The New 
Brunswick Tourist Association, which 
was held in St. John, N.B. recently!- 
shows that that body is not yet weary in 
well doing. 

According to the report of the executive 
committee, two booklets were issued, one 
for distributing abroad, the other for visitors 
to St. John. Over 25,000 of the former 
were printed, and all but 600 disributed. 
The association has had illustrated articles, 
descriptive of New Brunswick, published in 
several newspapers, magazines and trade 
papers in Canada and in the United States. 
Over 22,000 picture post cards were issued 
by the association and sold to local 
stationers. Photographs for lantern slides 
and descriptive matter have been sup- 
plied lecturers in New England. These 
have already been shown in Boston, New 
York and Philadelphia. In several other 
ways efforts have been made to advertise 
the Province. 

W. S. Fisher, the president of the asso- 
ciation, sketched briefly the progress of the 
work in St. John since its inauguration, and 
told of the work of organization in other 
cities of Canada. He appealed for greater 
interest and more energetic work in bringing 
forward these advantages. A report was 
read showing that about 200 non-resident 
sportsmen took out licenses last year, bring- 
ing to the Government $6, 000 for game and 
$3 000 for Ashing licenses. These would 
spend in the Province about $200,000, and 
from ordinary tourists, numbering, say, 
6,000 per week for 10 weeks, the receipts 
would probably be $2,400,000. An estimate 
of travel compiled from the different railways 
and steamship services showed that about 
5,300 tourists per week visited New Bruns- 
wick last year. 

The New Brunswick Tourist Association- 
is to be congratulated on the success that 
has followed their efforts to advertise the 
great attractions of the Province to summer 
tourists. It should, moreover, encourage 
merchants and others in many sections of 
Canada to organize for the purpose of dis- 
seminating information regarding their 
respective localities. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN OUR OWN. 



THERE is some unevenness in the 
wire cloth market in the United 
States, as represented by the quota- 
tions of both manufacturers and jobbers. 
The low prices made by some makers are 
v not, however, to be taken as representative 
of the market at large, in which the 
principal manufacturers are maintaining 
prices pretty steadily, some, indeed, antici- 
pating that, with the advance of the season 
and the possible development of a scarcity, 
higher values will rule. The price to retail 
merchants who buy in ordinary small lots 
may be named as about 95c. to $1, a slightly 
lower figure being obtainable by those who 
buy in round lots from the manufacturers. 
— Iron Age. 

SCOTCH IRON TRADE IN 1900. 

The annual trade statement of the Scotch 
ironmasters shows that the production of 
iron in iqoo was 1,153,000 tons, a decrease 
of 1 3 000 tons. 

The consumption in foundries was 295,- 
000 tens, an increase of 106,000 tons. 
Malleable iron and steel, however, showed 
a decrease of no fewer than 109,000 tons. 

The exports were 331,000 tons, or 16.000 
tons more. 

Stocks in Connal's stores are down 174.- 
000 on the year", while iron in makers' 
yards is up to 31,000 tons. 

IRON AND STEEL EXPORTS OF THE U.S. 
We have opportnnity merely to refer in a 
general way to the exhibit of iron and steel 
exports for 1900, the advance sheets having 
just been received from the Treasery De- 
partment bureau. The $100,000,000 mark 
in this trade was passed in 1899, when the 
total was $105,689,645 ; but 1900, even 
with its slump in prices, goes well beyond 
this, showing the imposing total of $129,- 
633 480 for all iron and steel sent abroad, 
including machinery. In 1897 the total 
was less than half this, or 562,737,250. 

Pig iron exports last year amounted to 
286 783 tons, as compared with 228,640 
tons in 1899. The billet transactions of 
last summer were heavy, as is well known ; 
for the year the shipments abroad were 
107,476 tons, or more than four times the 
^total of 25,605 tons in 1899. Steel rail ex- 
ports were 356,245 gross tons in 1900, and 
of this amount 125,931 tons went to British 
North America. For 1899 tne ra 'l exports 
were only 171,272 to all countries. The 
exports of structural material were 67,7:4 
gross tons, against 54,244 tons in 1899 ; 
steel bars, 81,366 gross tons ; wire rods, 
10,651 tons ; wire, 78,014 tons ; wire nails, 



27,404 gross tons, against 37,500 tons in 
1899 and 15 000 tons in 1898. The " pipes 
and fittings " sent abroad in 1900 were 
valued at $5,994,521, as against $6,763,- 
396 in 1899 — Iron Trade Review. 

WEAK METAL MARKETS IN ENGLAND. 

S. W. Royse & Co., Manchester, Eng., 
in their monthly report on the metal trade, 
say: "Prices of pig iron show a heavy 
fall since the beginning of the year — about 
8s. per ton in Scotch iron, and about 4s. 
6d. per ton in Cleveland. Shipments from 
Glasgow and Middlesbrough during this 
year are only about half of what they were 
in the corresponding period of last year. 
These facts show a very bad state of trade, 
and, indeed, there has been little business 
doing at Glasgow latterly, and scarcely any 
at Middlesbrough during the last fortnight. 
The higher-priced metals also, have not 
commenced the year well. Copper has lost 
ground steadily, and is £2 5s. per ton 
cheaper than at the beginniugof the month. 
Tin, however, after a considerable drop 
early in the month, has advanced again and 
is practically unchanged. Spelter is prac- 
tically unchanged. Lead is down 5s. per 
ton, and is easy." 

7 HE IRON TRADE SITUATION. 
Increased activity in finished materials, 
as compared with the earlier weeks of the 
year, is now apparent, and close students 
of conditions believe that buying will soon 
show itself that will give indications of the 
scale of operations in important consuming 
lines in 1901 . Pig iron buying by foundries 
and mills is still postponed, and it may be 
some time before liberal contracting will be 
seen. There is no doubt of the better tone 
given to the market at large by the heavy 
purchases of Bessemer iron reported last 
week. These showed that in spite of the 
large increase in blast furnace capacity, the 
leading interests still require considerable 
outside iron. Two important consolidations 
are expected to be in the market later for 
Bessemer iron for shipment in the first 
half. The price has advanced 25c, as 
shown by sales of the past week, and it is 
now reported that Bessemer iron is not to be 
had below $13 at valley furnaces. — Iron 
Trade Review. 

PROFITS IN THE BRITISH CYCLE TRADE. 
Whatever other trades have languished in 
1900 the wheels of the cycle manufacturing 
business, at any rate, would seem to have 
continued spinning briskly during all that 
time. In this connection, we have heard 
nothing of the complaints of bad trade and 
low prices with which aforetime we had be- 
come increasingly familiar. We are not 



sure if this has been the result of an increased 
demand on the part of the public for the 
means of enjoying this exhilarating method 
of locomotion. We should be inclined to 
say that to better organization on the part of 
manufacturers, rather than to any phenom- 
enal increase in the number of sales, has 
success in this instance been due — success, 
too, which must be all the more gratifying, 
inasmuch as it has been attained despite a 
very sensible advance in the cost of mater- 
ials and accessories. 

The 27 leading cycle firms, representing 
together a total capital of ,£4,803,573, have 
earned in the twelvemonth last gone by a 
profit of .£343.921 amongst them,, which 
works out at an average of 2 9 per cent. 
That is not a very large amount, perhaps, 
but it is, at all events, something to go on 
with, and in these days small things are not 
to be despised. Very many businesses did 
not do so well as that even. In the same 
period the nine leading tyre manufacturing 
companies, who possess an aggregate capital 
of ,£5,344,212, earned a matter of ,£343,921, 
an average profit per company of 6.4 per 
cent. Here, again, the increment has been 
due chiefly to their improved method of 
carrying on business, by which the big 
fluctuations of the past have been entirely 
obviated. — Commerce, London. 

HARDWARE TRADE IN THE STATES- 
The important fact, so far as market 
values are concerned, is the announcement 
on Tuesday of an advance of $2 per ton in 
the products of the American Steel & Wire 
Company. This came upon the trade as a 
surprise, although it had been contemplated 
as a possibility. 

There may be some difference of opinion 
as to the wisdom of the advance, as it will 
tend to stimulate competition, which, how- 
ever, is not as yet at all a serious matter ; 
but the effect on the market will probably 
be to give a more confident tone to values. 
There has of late been a good deal of ac- 
tivity in nails and wire, and the trade have 
been purchasing considerable quantities ; 
but it is not thought that this was done in 
anticipation of the advance, as there was 
no public intimation that it was coming. 
In most lines of general and shelf hardware 
the market is held pretty steadily, with a 
very gradual drift toward somewhat lower 
values. The changes which are taking 
place are not, however, of sufficient impor- 
tance to prevent the trade from buying in 
quantities to meet their requirements, and 
both wholesale and retail merchants are 
placing orders to keep their stocks up to a 
good working size. There are, indeed, 
some who think that with the passing of the 
dull season, which should now be nearly 
over, there may be a strengthening in 
values and some slight advance. — Iron 
Age, January 31. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THINGS I LEARNED WHILE STOCKTAKING. 



FIRST, the necessity of thoroughness. 
Stock taking being the time when all 
stock was handled, and probably par- 
cels and articles examined in a way that time 
does not allow during ordinary business hours, 
it was essential that not one slip should be 
made, but everything turned out of hand 
should be perfect and ready for sale, or fit 
to be placed in the fixtures without requiring 
any additional attention. 

2. To insure this, it was evident that 
overtime was necessary, as customers con- 
tinually interrupted, making a chance of 
mistakes, preventing thorough examination 
of articles, and making stocktaking itself 
drag out for an indefinite period — a thing 
obviously undesirable. 

3. Those firms whose assistants work till 

9 o'clock each evening have their stock 
done almost as soon as those who work till 

10 o'clock, and the workers do not have 
that tired, worn-out look with them all the 
time. 

4. Overtime being paid for, and not only 
tea money given, as in some instances, put 
interest in the work for all the assistants, 
they endeavoring to use their energies and 
care to prove that they had earned it. 

5. It is necessary to take every parcel 
out of the hole or fixture — a, to make sure 
that no odd line, as hooks, screws, broken 
lock, is left out of sight ; b, so that the hole 
may be swept, and it was noticed in doing 
this to be best to sprinkle with damp saw- 
dust to prevent the dust from flying to other 
fixtures, and then to sweep direct on to the 
dustpan held at the edge of the hole, so as 
to prevent the dirt from falling on the 
parcels below ; c, that parcels may be pro- 
perly sorted. 

6. All broken parcels should be opened 
— a, that as many original ones as possible 
may be made ; b, that the contents may be 
thoroughly examined for shortages, as locks 
without keys, or barrel bolts without staples, 
etc. ; c, for sorting when lines, as cup hooks, 
screws, bolts, etc., are mixed ; d, for taking 
out damaged articles not fit to sell at full 
price. 

7. Careful parceling and dusting saves 
contents from damaging, so ragged parcels 
should have ne*w paper and broken boxes 
be replaced by sound ones, and then be 
marked showing the nature and quantities 
of contents. If full quantities are in a 
parcel or box, the string should be tied in a 
knot, or the bow twisted under the fold of 
the paper or lid, to save time and labor 
when full parcels are required. 



*A prize essay which appeared in Australian 
Ironmonger. 



8. Fire and box irons, crosscut and cir- 
cular saws, all bright steel goods, as well as 
guns, revolvers, etc., should be oiled to save 
from rust and kept in a dry place, and not 
downstairs where the damp gets to them. 
Wrought kettles, saucepans, etc., stained 
by straw, should be painted again with 
black, and if bruised they should be 
straightened before putting into stock, thus 
preventing delay when required. Ice chests, 
wood buckets, mirrors and woodenware 
should not be placed on the top storey 
where the sun plays on them, causing them 
to crack. Different sizes of lamp glasses 
should each have separate holes to prevent 
unnecessary handling and liability of 
breakage. 

9. That ladders are the cause of a good 
deal of the untidiness of the stock, for if 
too long or short to reach the fixture they 
are leaned against the stock, pushing it out 
of place, and the assistant, grasping a cor- 
ner of the parcel to pull it forward, tears it, 
or else leaves it pushed back in the holes. 

10. When overstocks are made, tickets 
should always be placed over the stock hole 
to denote same ; this prevents errors in 
double ordering, and often saves time in 
searching. 

11. That samples should not be tied to 
stock parcels, but samples of cutlery, 
scissors, pen and pocket knives, razors, etc., 
should be kept in wrappers, and those of 
hinges, all classes of hooks, screws, locks, 
bolts, etc., be fastened on boards, and 
placed so as to attract customers' attention; 
this will save considerable time in serving, 
and will prevent the customers from hand- 
ling the stock, thus saving from tarnished 
and often damaged articles, and the mixing 
of the keys in the case of locks. 

12. When it is really necessary to show 
customers packages, sheep shears, shear 
stones, shovels, spades, handles, etc., to 
select from, only one parcel at a time should 
be opened, and not another till most of the 
contents of the first are sold, thus stopping 
an accumulation of lines well picked over 
which will need pushing later on. 

13. That tins or boxes suitable to fixtures 
should be made to hold all classes of small 
lines constantly required, as hinges, screws, 
etc.; this will save time in serving, tying of 
parcels and keep the apperance of stock 
clean and attractive, as well as pre- 
venting two or three parcels of the one line 
being opened. 

14. There should always be a counter for 
job or damaged articles, and the articles 
should be placed on this counter when 
noticed, and not allowed to wait till there is 



a large accumulation. All repairs when 
noticed should be put in the repair book ; 
this will save keeping useless stock. 

15. To prevent an accumulation of odd 
or obsolete lines, as special sizes and makes 
in lamp glasses, sheep shears, nails, var- 
nishes, cutlery, new inventions, etc., only 
sufficient to supply orders in hand should 
be purchased, remembering in all stock 
ordering that, with the speedy means of 
transport we have compared with the earlier 
days of the colonies, it does not pay to 
stock heavily. 

16. It is best to have a price book con- 
taining the selling price of all lines, thus 
saving labor in making or altering prices on 
parcels, preventing errors, as prices are con- 
stantly torn off parcels and tickets, or par- 
cels are overlooked in remarking, then a 
customer may have his list price direct from 
the desk without going around to the various 
fixtures, and in invoicing errors and guess- 
work are dropped. 

17. As the stock of a hole is taken, it 
should be entered direct in the stock book 
and a ticket branded T fastened on the hole 
or fixture. Assistants in entering up these 
lines should mark their entries with a T in 
the sales book, and at the finish all T sales 
lines can be added up and deducted from 
the gross amount. 



GASOLINE LAMPS PROHIBITED. 

A despatch from Toledo, Ohio, says : 
"State Oil Inspectors, Frank L. Baird, of 
Toledo and John R. Mallow, of Columbus, 
to-day issued a positive mandate that all 
manufacturers of gasoline lamps in the 
State must discontinue such manufacture 
and use at once. There are several large 
factories in Ohio and many thousand users. 
It is intended to serve notice on all at first 
and if the order is not obeyed in reasonable 
time, radical measures will be inaugurated 
It is anticipated that the manufacturers will 
fight the matter through the courts. The 
statutes of Ohio are very positive on the 
subject, but have never been made effective 
by former State Oil Inspectors." 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS • 

Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



BUSINESS SUCCESS. 

THE chief cry from all great institu- 
tions — railroad, big manufacturing 
establishments, trusts, insurance 
companies, publishing houses, banking 
and merchandising concerns — is for men of 
brains — clever, keen, enterprising men of 
executive ability — men who do things. 
For such men there is no practical limit to 
the salaries they can attain. Since the 
beginning of time there never was a period 
when genius, or even first-rate ability could 
command in the business world anything 
like the salary it commands to day. 

The fact is that capital alone is pitiably 
helpless. Brains mean more than capital 
the world over. Capital is much more 
dependent upon man than man is upon 
capital. The human being who thinks and 
works can do something without capital ; 
capital can do nothing without human aid. 

In business it is not so much a question 
of money as of brains. The strongest 
house with a weak management, I care not 
how old or how respectable its history, will 
go to the wall, while the weak house with a 
strong management will become big and 
powerful. This is inevitable. Man is king, 
not capital, and this will hold true through- 
out the ages, whether there be trusts or no 
trusts, combinations of capital or no com- 
binations. Brains must at all times and 
under all conditions be reckoned with. 

I am not so pessimistic as Mr. Croker 
about the future of the young man. This 
is a problem that the latter will work out for 
himself. There doubtless will be fewer 
individual business men, but it doesn't 
follow at all that there will be less success- 
ful men, and measured, too, by the dollar. 

But what is success anyway ? It cannot 
be measured alone by the accumulation of 
money. This would be a most imperfect 
and misleading measurement. Many things 
enter into the problem of working out a suc- 
cessful career. The very brief span of life 
allotted to man must be taken into considera- 
tion. If one sacrifices health, comfort, 
pleasure, family and friends merely to build 
up a name as the head of a business, gain- 
ing with all a fortune at middle life, has he 
lived wisely and well ? Has his life been 
full and rich ? Has he got all out of it that 
he was entitled to, has it meant to him what 
*it should mean, according to his own estim- 
ate ? With all his worries and strife — with 
all his business losses from failures and 
dishonesty — with meeting ruinous competi- 
tion, and a thousand other annoying and 
trying conditions inevitable in the life of 
the business man who has carved out his 
own career — has he worked out the problem 
of Hying as well as the chum of his boyhood 



MAKE A NAME 
FOR YOURSELF 

by selling a paint that no one else in your 
locality can sell, and that will build your reputation by giving 
satisfaction to all users. 

The Sherwin Williams paint is the best 

paint to do it with. We protect you in the sale of it. The 
profit on every gallon used in your locality goes into your 
pocket. No one can take the business away from you when 
you've built it up. 

S.-W. P. gives the greatest satisfaction because it gives the 
best value for the money ; because it covers most, wears longest ( 
looks best and is most economical. We can prove these paints 
to you. 

You can't make a name on lead and oil, but you can on 
S.-W.P. 

The "B-13" booklet tells you how. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



Ntto YORK. 
MONTREAL. 



BOSTON. 
TORONTO. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
KANSAS CITY. 




who has had all these 20 odd years a snug 
berth and salary ? 

The latter has had no serious cares, no 
worries, and no notes to pay. He has had 
time to be a good fellow — to be a good 
husband, and a good father, and to make 
friends — time to get pleasure out of each 
day and each week and each year as they 
went by — time to read and think, and grow 
broader, and sweeter, and wiser — time to 
keep health and youth. Possibly he is not 
worth as much in hard cash at 50 as his 
boyhood friend, and possibly he is worth a 
good deal more. At all events, he has 
sipped daily of the sweets of life, while the 
other has waited for success to crown his 
efforts before tasting these pleasures. But 
pleasures do not wait on any man. They 
must betaken as they pass by. — Munsey's 



REVISED PRICE LIST ON 
HORSE NAILS. 



C" 



HARTNEY MERCHANTS MEET. 

The business men of Hartney, Man., 
have formed an association for the purpose 
of advancing the interests of the town and 
the surrounding district. At their meeting 
on Wednesday evening, last week, it was 
decided to encourage the proposal to start a 
creamery at that place. The officers of the 
association are : President, James Innes : 
first vice-president, R. Shone ; second vice- 
president, E. Chapin ; secretary, T. D. 
Sutherland ; treasurer, E. K. Strathy. 



THE following is a copy of a circular 
which the Canada Horse Nail Com- 
pany is sending out to the hardware 
trade under date of February 7 : 

We beg to submit to the hardware trade of 
Canada our revised trade list for " C " brand horse 
shoe nails ; also a farrier's retail box price list 
which we have this day adopted for use in Ontario, 
Quebec and the Maritime Provinces. 

The farrier's price list represents a price per box 
at which our nails may be sold to farriers in the 
Provinces above named, and which we shall re- 
quire hereafter to be maintained as a minimum 
selling price by those who sell our "C" brand 
horse nails. 

We desire, by the radical changes above an- 
nounced, to secure for those who deal in our "C ' 
brand horse nails, a legitimate business profit on 
their sale. This has not been the case, as you are 
aware, for some time past. 

We are fully determined to spare no efforts on 
our part to assist those who sell our " C" brand 
horse nails, and who will maintain our quotations, 
to secure a fair profit on their sale. 

We shall in future refuse to supply our nails to 
any firm against whom complaints are made and 
proved to be true of persistently underselling the 
quotations which we shall endeavor to establish. 

We are the oldest and largest manufacturers of 
horse nails in Canada ; our business being estab- 
lished in 1865. We manufacture only by the old 
reliable "hot forged'' process from the best 
Swedish charcoal steel nail rods. This process and 
the material we use is the best known used by any 
maker. 

Every nail is carefully examined and every box 
is warranted perfect. They may be returned at 
our expense if found otherwise. 

All horse nails made and sold by us have our 
registered trade mark (the Gothic " C ") and name 
ill full on every box. 

We ask the hardware trade for their loyal and 
generous support in making our efforts on their 
behalf successful. 



/ 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



YOUTH AS A FACTOR OF SUCCESS. 

IN one of the articles recently published 
in The London Times concerning Ameri- 
can supremacy, it is said : 
" It has been asked what are the Ameri- 
can manufacturer's advantages over his 
British confreres, and to what these advant- 
ages are due ? It is a bigger question than 
can be answered in a few words, but I will 
attempt to set down what appear to me to 
be the chief moving causes. Apart from 
physical resources — such as mineral wealth, 
etc., a subject already dealt with in former 
articles — perhaps the primary cause, if not 
the mainspring, of American enterprise is 
the consideration shown to youth. Mr. 
Lecky has said, in the introduction to 
' Democracy and Liberty ' : 

" 'The respect for old age is one of the 
strongest English instincts, and is often 
carried so far that it will be found that men 
only attain their maximum of influence at a 
time when their faculties are manifestly 
declining.' The truth of this is strongly 
brought home to an Englishman on first 
visiting the United States. The great 
Carnegie Steel Works, which made a profit 
of between $40,000,000 and $42,000,000 
in one year, afford an example ; one in 
many. Those who meet the founder of the 
company see a man full of vitality, but who 
has retired from the active management of 
the business at an age when many in this 
country look forward to years of control. 
The acting president is a young man, who 
was apparently not much above 30 years of 
age when he was appointed. There are 
three principal steel works owned by the 
company, each controlled by superintend- 
ents equally young, 

"In the whole course of my last trip to 
the United States, when I made the matter 
one of close observation, I can remember 
only two instances of elderly men taking 
the leading part in the management of 
works, and in one of these the business, 
although of great reputation, did not give 
promise of further advancement. 

" The Americans go on the principle that 
youth is the season of energy. As a man 
advances in life he has less to hope ; some- 
thing has gone out of him. He ventures 
less and wins less. In this country we are 
overcautious, and, though our caution may 
avoid some mistakes, it loses more good 
chances. 

" That the young men in the United 
States successfully fill positions for which 
we consider matured experience a first 
essential is due, no doubt, to a variety of 
causes, the first of which is to be found in 
the early treatment of children. I have 



sometimes been almost led to think there 
are no children in America, only some 
immature men and women." 



WHITE LEAD IN THE STATES. 

This market shows a moderate activity, 
with both contract deliveries and fresh 
orders, and prices are firmly held. Grinders 
are busy, and the outlet for dry lead is 
large, contract deliveries moving freely. 



The remaining supply is not large, so that 
orders in excess of contracts cannot com- 
mand concessions in price. Distributing 
houses are receiving their stocks of lead in 
oil for spring division among their retail 
customers, and, upon the whole, the market 
appears brisk for a late January week. The 
foreign brands in oil show no change in 
price or other feature. — Paint, Oil and Drujjt 
Review, Chicago. 



F IT'S A= 



~N 



Good Gun, Revolver or 

t>l CyCle you want 



BUY AN 



IVER JOHNSON 

None Better— Few as Good, 

DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUES FREE. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 



Branches— New York- 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 364 Main St. 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



What 
About 



BRUSHES 



for Spring 
Trade ? 



Our Revised Catalogue for 1901 now ready and our travellers are work- 
ing your way. Don't buy till you get our prices. We guarantee 
good values and prompt shipment. ..... 



Meakins & Sons 

Hamilton, Ont. 



Meakins, Sons & Co. 

Montreal, Que. 




E. B. SALYERDS 

Manufacturer of 

Hockey Sticksr 

PRESTON, 

Ontario, - Canada. 

The Best Stiok. 
Made of Rook Elm. 
Wholesale Trade Only Supplied. 
Ask your Wholesale House for 
the Preston make of Stiok. 
Write for Prices. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 



Front Street West, Toronto. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 




Sap Buckles. 

10 quarts. 




Eureka Sap Spouts. 




Lightning. 



Barclay's. 



T Handle. 



L Handle. 



Heath's. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 



WE SHIP 
PROMPTLY. 



Graham Wire and Cut Nails are tbe Best. 



OUR PRICES 
ARE RIGHT. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE SECTION OF THE TORONTO BOARD 

OF TRADE. 



THE annual report of the Hardware 
and Metal Section of the Toronto 
Board of Trade, as presented by the 
chairman, Mr. Peleg Howland, was as 
follows : 

An occasion for the calling together of this sec- 
tion has not arisen during the past year. 

The volume of business, which promised at the 
beginning of the year to be very large, was checked 
in the late spring by the downward tendency of 
prices which set in at that time, and, as a conse- 
quence, purchases during the latter half of the 
year were comparatively light, an effort being 
made to reduce the rather heavy stocks existing. 
The short crops in Manitoba and th« Northwest 
Territories also affected the sales of those doing 
business in that section. Notwithstanding these 
drawbacks, the year may be characterized as 
good. 

Prospects may be said to be encouraging, parti- 
cularly in this Province, where progress is being 
made in the development of the natural and indus- 
trial resources, and where the fatmeris prosperous, 
the yield of agricultural products having ' been 
large and better than average prices having Been 
realized. These conditions should lead to a good 
demand, with reasonable safety in granting credits, 
but do not warrant the elimination of caution, 
which is again recommended. 

In spite of your partially successful effotts, 
freight discrimination against this city on the part 
of the railroad companies continues. 

The difficulties of doing business in the North- 
west country are intensified by the seeming deter- 
mination of these companies to compel the distri- 
bution of all goods through Winnipeg by granting 
special traders' rates outward from that place. 

Whether relief will ome from the appointment 
of a railroad commission, which seems to before- 
shadowed, will depend largely upon its composition 
and powers. 

To be of any value, its members must be men 
absolutely incorruptible, of more than ordinary 
determination, and furnished with power to enforce 
their decisions. A judicial body, whose judgments 
must be referred to Government, will be practically 
useless. 

HARDWARE VS. DRY GOODS. 

A FAIR attendance was present at the 
hockey match last Monday even- 
ing at McQueen's rink, and once 
more the Drys were turned down, this time 
by the hardware players. After the game 
had been going only for a few minutes the 
"All-Wools" found they were up against 
something even harder than the tailors. 
Doc Stanton played in his usual position, 
cover point, and he was altogether too 
strong for his opponents, but whenever the 
rubber did pass him Charlie Boyd got it, 
and he would certainly lift the puck. Goal- 
keeper Crabb did good business, and made 
some splendid stops. Kendall and Broad, 
although spare men, are star forwards. 
The former apparently is an old-time 
shinney player. Terry, Whitehead, Sove- 



reen and H. Pauline put up good games. 
The score stood 40 in the first half in favor 
of the hardware and the second 4-3 mak- 
ing the score 8-3 for the " Nail Handlers." 
The teams lined up as follows : 

ALL-WOOLS. NAIL HANDLERS. 

Crabb Goal Murdoch 

Sovereen Point Boyd 

Terry Cover Point Stanton 

Pauline, V ^j i Kendall 

? r ° ad - Forwards. | — "' Pau,in /' H ' 

Thompson I Austin 

Wyckoff j \ Whitehead 

Referee, Jack Cribb. 

Timekeeper, W. E. Tisdale. 

Goal umpires — W. Anderson and G. Winters. 

— Reformer, Simcoe, January 31. 



BUYERS AND SELLERS. 

THIS is an age, probably more than 
any other when men are devising 
ways and means of facilitating busi- 
ness. The conditions under which business 
is tlone to-day necessitate it. And he who 
would keep in the van cannot afford to 
ignore the facilities thinking minds have 
provided. 

One thing it is important that a man in 
business should know is the names and 
addresses of those from whom he can buy 
goods and of those to whom he can sell 
goods. 

To secure this is usually a most difficult 
undertaking, and the wider his trade the 
more difficult it is. This has now been 
made easy for every business man, manu- 
facturer, or wholesaler, no matter in what 
branch of trade he is engaged, consequent 
upon the appearance of a book which gives 
the name of every manufacturer in every 
branch of trade within the confines of the 
Dominion of Canada. •• The Manufac- 
turers' List Buyers' Guide of Canada" is 
the name of the book, and the publishers 
are The Manufacturers' List Co., 34 
Victoria street, Toronto. 

It tells where to obtain any article that a 
buyer may want. About 22,000 articles 
are indexed in the book, and the names of 
7,800 manufacturers are alphabetically 
arranged for addressing purposes, giving 
the kind of factory of each. Not included 
in this, and also arranged alphabetically 
and classified, are 350 butter factories and 
creameries, 800 cheese factories, 250 fish, 
lobster and salmon packing houses, 150 
electric light plants, 45 steam railway cor- 
porations, 500 shippers of grain, eggs, etc. 
Another valuable list is that of the classified 
manufacturers. In this 4,995 classes of 
goods are enumerated alphabetically, with 
the different makers of each below them. 
Altogether there are over 10,000-manufac- 
turers named in the book. 



To obtain the technical information con- 
tained in this book for classification it was 
necessary to visit each factory personally 
throughout the Dominion, as in no other 
way could it be gathered so completely and 
intelligibly. And no manufacturer has been 
omitted because he did not see fit to adver- 
tise in the book or subscribe for it. 

It is well printed, and bound in a strong * 
cloth cover, stamped in gold, contains 483 
pages, 8 x 10, and is sent to any place in 
the Empire on receipt of $5 . 

The Department of Trade and Commerce 
has, through the King's printer, ordered a 
sufficient number of copies of this book for 
distribution among the Canadian commercia 1 
agents in Great Britain, Australia, South 
Africa, Norway and Sweden, Trinidad, 
Argentine Republic, etc.; also copies for the 
Glasgow Exhibition and Imperial Institute, 
London. 



INQUIRIES REGARDING -CANADIAN 
TRADE. 

Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
London, England, is in receipt of the 
following inquiries : 

i. A company manufacturing crucible tool and 
mining drill steel, files, machine planing irons, 
etc.-, would be prepared to arrange for its agency 
with a first-class Canadian firm possessing the 
necessary connection. 

a. A London house seeks the service of a good 
Canadian representative to introduce glues. 

3. The manufacturer of a patent file-cuttipg 
machine wishes to appoint a Canadian agent. 

4. A firm manufacturing carriage upholstery, 
etc., asks for names of Canadian shippers of sea 
grass. 

5. A Leeds house wishes to secure the services of 

* 
a responsible Canadian agent to attepd to the pur- 
chase and shipment of apples on their behalf. 
First-class references required. 

6. A London firm dealing in oils, wax, honey, 
minerals, drugs, gums, etc., would be pleased to 
hear from Canadian shippers of their lines. 

7. A company using considerable quantities of 
asbestos is prepared to hear from Canadian owners 
of developed deposits of asbestos of good quality. 



TWINE FACTORY IN CHATHAM. 

The promoters of The Chatham Binder 
Twine Co. report that stock has been so 
readily subscribed that the factory is an 
assured fact. Mr. Cummings, one of the 
directors, has gone to Montreal and other 
points to make definite arrangements for 
the binder twine factory. 



STEEL PLANT FOR OTTAWA. 

It is understood that Canadian and 
United States capitalists will soon erect and 
operate in Ottawa a steel plant for the 
manufacture of tools and hardware. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND 



LTAL 



17 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

A GOOD CATALOGUE OF SPECIALTIES. 

The catalogue of The Dowswell Manufac- 
turing Co., Limited, for 1901 is one that 
should interest all Canadian hardware 
dealers. It comprises full illustrated de- 
scriptions of the clothes wringers, washing 
^nachines, mangles, revolving barrel churns, 
egg crates, lawn swings, garden hose reels, 
butter workers, and repairs for these goods, 
which are manufactured by them. 

The reputation this firm has obtained for 
producing up-to-date goods, and the great 
range in design, price and quality of their 
product is such that every salesman who 
handles these lines should make himself 
familiar with the contents of this book. A 
copy of it can be had from either the Hamil- 
ton office or from the eastern agents of the 
firm, W. L. Haldimand & Son, 32 and 34 
St. Dizier street, Montreal. 

'an attractive catalogue. 

We have just received a copy of Boeckh 
Bros. & Company's 1901 catalogue, which 
is more attractive this year than in former 
years. The cover is of an exceptionally 
neat design, and, while the coloring is not 
too bright, it is rich in its effect. 

The late date of its appearance, we are 
informed, was due to the revising of the 
prices on all lines, and many reductions 
have been made, where it was possible, 
without cutting the quality of the goods. 

It will be worth your while to write for 
this useful book. It will prove "a friend, 
indeed" when you are making up your 
orders. 



ST.'JOHN HARDWAREMEN MEET. 

Tke »eventh annual meeting of the St. 
John (N.B,) Iron and Hardware Association 
was held a few days ago in the board of 
trade rooms. The following officers were 
elected : 

President — S. Hayward. 
Vice- President — P. Carmichael. 
Secretary-Treasurer — J. J. Barry. 
Directors— R. B. Emerson, W. H. Thome and 
Thomas McAvity. 

The following resolution was unanimously 
adopted : " That the association lament the 
death of Her Most Gracious Majesty Queen 
Victoria, and desire to record our great 
sympathy for the irreparable loss that the 
British Empire has sustained, and at the 
^.me time express our devotion to her 
worthy successor, King Edward VII. 

" Further resolved, that, in consequence 
of the death of Her Majesty Queen Victoria, 
the usual annual dinner be not held this 
year." 



The Swansea Forging Co., Limited, 
Swansea, Ont., is applying for permission 
to surrender their charter of incorporation. 




Paint 1 



is Paint — to a certain extent. Perhaps 
it looks alike to you ; but is it ? How about 
its working qualities, its wearing qualities ? 
Are you handling paints that sell, and sell 
again ? Does your paint trade increase as it 
ought ? 

RAMSAYS PAINTS 

will increase your trade, and bring you money, 
because they are the best that are made in 
paints, and at the lowest cost. Once sold they 
sell again — all your work is not for nothing. 
A paint that won't sell again is direct loss for 
you — don't you think so ? 



A. RAMSAY & SON, 

Est'd 1842 
PAINTMAKERS, MONTREAL. 



DIAMOND VISE AND DRILLING ATTACHMENT 

U. S. Patent Jan. 15, '95. Canadian Patent July 22, '95. 




JAWS are faced with steel % inch wide, 4 inches long, 
firmly fastened to jaw, checked and hardened. 

VISE weighs 38 pounds. DRILL weighs 13 pounds. 

For Site by Jobbers of Hardware. 

Made by— 

The Adims Company, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
Made by A. R. Woodyatt & Co., Guelph, Ont 

Here it i^ff^jr* 

THE NEW CENTURY 

BANNER 
COLD BLAST 
LANTERN 

I Patented January, 1901) 

Possesses the following advantages over 
all other makes : 

Handsome In Design. 
Perfect In Construction. 
Magnificent Light— 20 Candle Power. 

The Lantern of the age for outside light, either on 
land or sea. Every BANNER Lantern has a brass 
plate bearing our name and guarantee. 



The Ontario Lantern Co , 

Hamilton, Ont. 

WALTER GROSE, Montreal, 

Sole Selling Agent. 




18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL* 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, February 8, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

ALTHOUGH trade is not brisk, it 
seems to be in a healthy condition. 
Business runs principally in shelf 
goods for immediate delivery, while for later 
shipment all lines are in demand. The 
travellers are booking nice orders for spring 
and summer goods, and in most lines there 
seems to be no hesitation in ordering good 
supplies. One of the healthiest signs in the 
hardware trade at the present moment is 
the fact that stocks throughout the country 
are light, and, if the consumptive demand 
comes on at all brisk, the wholesalers and 
manufacturers must soon feel it. Merchants 
have been buying on a falling market, and 
their stocks are now pretty well cleared out. 
This is proven by the number of letter and 
sorting orders that are being received. The 
feature of the week is the unsettled condition 
of the horse nail market. The general run 
of discounts now seems to be 50, 10 and 5 
per cent, on oval head, and 50, 10 and 10 
per cent, on countersunk head. The 



Canada Horse Naii Co. have decided to 
inaugurate a new price list altogether, men- 
tion of which will be found in another 
column. Their discounts will also be 
different. That the American wire market 
is improving is shown by the fact that The 
American Steel and Wire Co. have raised 
their prices of plain and barb wire and wire 
nails $2 per ton. This will not directly 
affect Canadian values, but it shows the 
trend of the market. Screws have taken a 
slump since our last report, due to a trade 
war being carried on by American manu- 
facturers. All manufacturers' supplies, such 
as bolts, nuts and rivets, are in good de- 
mand. Payments are fair. 

Barb Wire — Trade is quiet, with few 
transactions occurring. The price is still 
$3.20 f.o.b. Montreal in less than carlots. 

Galvanized Wire — This line is feature- 
less at present. The market is steady. We 
quote : No. 5, $4.25; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge 
#3-55 I No. 9, S3. 10; No. io, $3.75; 
No. ii, 83.85; No. 12, #3.25 ; No. 13, 
$3.35; No. 14, $4-25; No. 15, $4-75 '< 
No. 16, $5.00. 



Smooth Steel Wire — The feature in 
this line is that the price has been advance^ 
loc. per 100 lb. across the border. The 
price here remains the same, $2.80 per 
100 lb. 

Fine Steel Wire — The usual demand 
continues. The discount is iy}4 percent, 
off the list. 

Brass and Copper Wire — There is 
nothing new to note. A fair trade is being 
done. Discounts are 55 and 2^ per cent, 
on brass, and 50 and z% per cent, on 
copper. 

Fence Staples — Trade is of a limited 
character. We quote : $3.25 for bright, 
and $3.75 for galvanized, per keg of 
100 lb. 

Wire Nails — The advance on the part 
of the American Wire and Steel Company 
affects this product in the United States 
also. Trade here is quiet and consists of a 
small sorting nature. We quote 52.85 for 
small lots and #2.75 for carlots, f.o.b. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Gananoque, and St. John, N.B. 

Cut Nails — Inquiry is very small, and, 




Samson 



<?\ 






Bottoms 



Wear 



LONG 

SMOOTH 

FOREVER 



They are made from pne piece of heavy sheet steel, heavily tinned after being made up. A 
y% inch iron rod is fastened in bottom rim making it solid. Always wear round and smooth. 

CANNOT BREAK AND LEAVE RAGGED EDGES . 

THE MOST SANITARY BO TTOM MADE. * 

Milk can and cheese vat tinned sheets carried in stock at Montreal and London. 

Prices Cheerfully Given. — 

The McClary Mfg. Co. 




LONDON 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



in 



DISPLAY 

Your stock on the front of 




BENNETT'S PATENT SHELF BOX 

and your store will be a great attraction 
to customers. 

Prices and full particulars from 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., Toronto. 

X.B. -Don't forget we make boxes to fit your pres- 
ent shelving. 



Drain Pipes 
Portland Cements 
Fire Bricks 

Contractors' and 
Founders' Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 Wellington street, MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 




Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

™i CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, OUT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

* DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and othpr Machinery where great strength 
s required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



as is to be expected at this time of year, 
trade is dull. Prices are steady. We quote 
as follows : $2. 35 for small and $2.25 for 
carlots ; flour barrel nails, 25 per cent, 
discount; coopers' nails, 30 per cent, 
discount. 

Horse Nails — On account of the open 
prices that are now prevailing the condition 
of the horse nail market is unsettled. The 
ruling discounts are 50, 10 and 5 per cent, 
on oval head 50, 10 and 10 per cent, on 
countersunk head. " C " brand has been 
put on a new price list and has a discount 
of its own. 

Horseshoes — Trade keeps up remark- 
ably well and the market is in a good 
condition. We quote : Iron shoes, light 
and medium pattern, No. 2 andlarger,$3.5o; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 
2 and larger, $3.75 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.00 ; X L steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.85 ; feather-weight, all sizes, $4.85; toe 
weight steel shoes, all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. 
Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, ioc. extra. 

Poultry Netting — Business seems to 
have started very well, dealers buying freely 
at a discount of 50 and 5 per cent. 

Green Wire Cloth — Values remain at 
$1.35 per 100 sq. ft. Business continues 
as before. 

Freezers — New price lists have been 
issued and orders are being booked. "Peer- 
less ' ' is quoted as follows : " Two quarts, 
J1.85 ; 3 quarts, $2.10; 4 quarts, $2.50; 
6 quarts, $3.20 ; 8 quarts, $4 ; 10 quarts. 
$5.25 ; 12 quarts, $6 ; 16 quarts, with fly 
wheel, $11 ; toy, 1 pint, J1.40. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Fair- 
sized orders are being booked at old figures. 
We quote: Screen doors, plain cherry finish, 
$8.25 per doz.; do. fancy, $11.50 per doz.; 
windows, $2.25 to $3 .50 per doz. 

Screws — Again, on account of the war 
being waged by the manufacturers of the 
United States, values have declined here. 
Discounts are now as follows-: Flat head 
bright, Zyyi and 10 per cent, offlist; round 
head bright, 82 % and 10 per cent. ; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 

Bolts — The country manufacturers have 
been placing some good orders for imme- 
diate shipment this week. Discounts are : 
Carriage bolts, 65 per cent. ; machine bolts, 
65 per cent. ; coach screws, 75 per cent.; 
sleigh shoe bolts, 75 per cent.; bolt ends, 
65 per cent.; plough bolts, 50 per cent.; 
square nuts, 4#c. per lb. offlist ; hexagon 
nuts, 4&c. per lb. offlist ; tire bolts, 67^ 
per cent.; stove bolts, 67 j£ percent. 

Building Paper — Spring business is 
being done as before. We quote as fol- 
lows : Tarred felt, 51.70 per 100 lb.; 2 ply, 



TINPLATES 

" Lydbrook," " Grafton," 
" Allaways," etc. 

TINNED SHEETS 

" Wilden " Brand and 
cheaper makes. 

All s zes and gauges imported. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL. 




IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE 5. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait, Canada. 

ADAM HOPE &CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

We have in stock 

PIG TIN 
INGOT COPPER 
LAKE COPPER 
PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



T 



HERE is an old saying . " You cannot get too 
much of a good thing." That is why we 



keep harping at you about 



ELASTILITE VARNISH 




As Follows 

'c'C 

/6/>MrAr,'s 16 Pints 

12 Quarts <SHi\ir6iii 
^^3 g/lt-'S^D- 







If you get tired reading our ads. about it, send for one of 
the above cabinets and you will never have to tire yourself 
talking to sell it. One can sells another. You cannot afford 
to be without it. 

-MANUFACTURED ONLY BY— 

£ Imperial Varnish k Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



JOHN BOWMAN 
HARDWARE & COAL CO., 

....London, Ont 

Large new stock of all leading lines. 
Headquarters for . . . 

Linseed Oil Screen Doors 

Paints Lawn Mowers 

Window Glass Cordage 

Building Paper Paris Green 

Harvest Tools Etc. 



Also large and full assortment of 

CUTLERY 



of all leading manufacturers. 



ready roofing, 8oc. per roll ; 3-ply, $1.05 
per roll ; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; dry 
sheathing, 30c. per roll ; tar sheathing, 
40c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll ; 
tarred fibre, 60c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X.L., 
65c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, #28 
per ton ; slaters' felt, 50c. per roll. 

Rivets — Some fair orders have 
been placed this week. The discount on 
best iron rivets, section, carriage, and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., coop- 
ers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs are 
quoted at 55 per cent, off; copper rivets, 35 
and 5 per cent, off; and coppered iron rivets 
and burrs, in 5 -lb. carton boxes, are quoted 
at 60 and 10 percent, off list. 

Cordage — A fair trade continues to be 
done at last week's quotations. Manila 
is quoted at 13c. per lb. for 7-16 and larger; 
sisal at 9c, and lathyarn 9c. per lb. In 
small lots yic. per lb. higher is charged. 

Spades and Shovels — Trade is rather 
small. The discount is still 40 and 5 per 
cent, off the list. 

Harvest Tools — A little business is 
being done on future account at 50, 10 and 
5 per cent, discount. 

Tacks — The demand is seasonable. 
We quote : Carpet tacks, in dozens and 
bulk, blued 80 and 5 per cent, discount ; 



tinned, 80 and 10 per cent.; cut tacks, 
blued, in dozens, 75 and 15 per cent, dis- 
count. 

Churns — Some spring business is being 
done at a discount of 56 per cent. 

Firebricks — Business is dull. The 
price is unchanged at #18.50 to #26, as to 
brand. 

Cement — Supplies are not wanted. 
We quote: German, $2.50 to $2.65; Eng- 
lish, $2.40 to $2.50; Belgian, $1 90 to 
$2.15 per bbl. 

MKTAL.F. 

The demand for metals on local and 
country account is not large for immediate 
shipment, but in all lines, except for Can- 
ada plate, spring business is being done. 

Pig Iron — Canadian pig is worth about 
#19 on the Montreal market, Summerlee 
bringing $24 to #25. 

Bar Iron — The feeling is steady. The 
rolling mills report the demand brisk and 
prices well maintained. Dealers are ask- 
ing #1.65 to #1.70 per 100 lb. 

Black Sheets — A small seasonable de- 
mand has been felt this week. Prices rule 
at $2. 80 for 8 to 16 gauge; $2.85 for 26 
gauge, and $2 90 for 28 gauge. 

Galvanized Iron — Some important 
orders have been placed this week at un- 
changed figures. We quote: No. 28 Queen's 



Head, $5 to $5.10 ; Apollo, 10^ oz., $5 to 
$5.10; Comet, No. 28, $4.50, with 25c. 
allowance in case lots. 

Ingot Copper — The statistics for the 
end of January show on the half-month a de- 
crease of 350 tons in American stocks, and 
an increase in afloats of 300 tons. The 
cable advices report a firmer market, and, 
although there is not much activity, prices 
are steady. Values here rule about i7#c. 

Ingot Tin — The statistics for the end of 
the month are unfavorable, but the actual 
figures do not surprise the market. The 
visible supply for America increased 2,440 
tons, and the total visible supply increased 
2,131 tons. The market is quiet at 32 to 
33C 

Lead — The price of lead is steady at 
#4 65. 

Lead Pipe — A small demand only is be- 
ing felt and the market is quiet. We quote : 
7c. for ordinary and 7#c. for composition 
waste, with 15 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — There is no change to note. 
We quote as follows: Black pipe, }i, 53 
per 100ft. ; ft. $3 ; #, 53 ; tf, $3.15 ; 
i-in.,$4.5o; i^,#6.io; i#,$7.28; 2-in., 
59-7S- Galvanized, #, #4.60 ; %, $$.2$ ; 
1 in., $7.50 ; 1 %, #9.80 ; 1'A, $11.75 I 2 ' 
in., $16. 

Tinplates — Spring shipments are being 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



arranged for now. The ruling figures for 
immediate delivery are $4.50 for coke and 
$4.75 for charcoal. 

Canada Plate — Business is rather slow 
on spring account. Some shipments for 
immediate requirements are being made. 
We quote: 52's, $2.90; 6o's, 53 ; 75's, 
$3.10; full polished, $3.75, and galvanized, 
H $4.60. 

Tool Steel -We quote: Black Diamond, 
8c; Jessop's 13c. 

Steel — No change. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, 51.85 ; tire, #1.95 ; spring, $2.75 ; 
machinery, $2.75 and toe-calk, $2.50. 

Terne Plates — Some few shipments 
mm are being made. We quote $8.25. 

Swedish Iron — Unchanged at #4 25. 

Coil Chain — A good business is being 
done in coil chain. American manufactur- 
ers report that they are very busy. We 
quote: No. 6, 11 l Ac; No. 5,10c; No. 4,9^0.; 
No. 3, 9c; j^-inch, 7%c. per lb.; 5-16, 
$4.60; 5-16 exact, $5.10; }i, 54.20; 7-16, 
$4.00; %, $3.75; 9-i6, $3.65; %, $3-35; 
#>53- 2 5; H> $3-2o; i-in., $3.15. In car- 
load lots an allowance of 10c. is made. 

Sheet Zinc — The ruling price is 6 to 6#c. 

Antimony — Quiet, at 10c 

GLASS. 
Quite a large number of import orders 
have been booked this week on a basis of 
$1.75 for first break of 50 feet and $1.85 
for second break. Small shipments are 
being made from stock. We quote as 
follows : First break, $2 ; second, $2.10 
for 50 feet ; first break, 100 feet, $3. 80 ; 
second, $4 ; third, $4.50; fourth, 54.75; 
fifth, $5.25; sixth, 555.75, and seventh, 
$6.25. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 
The feature of the paint and oil market is 
the series of slumps in linseed oil for sum- 
mer delivery on the English market; during 
the last two weeks it has declined 9c. per 
gal. This is due to the dullness prevailing 
in London, and low speculative offers have 
been made in anticipation of a huge River 
Platte crop. A reaction is expected. There 
has been no change locally as light stocks 
keep values firm, but linseed oil buyers are 
holding off, buying merely from hand-to- 
mouth. Last week in nearly all depart- 
ments of the paint and oil business was 
decidedly flat. Saturday was universally 
observed as a holiday throughout the 
Dominion. It is thought that a brisk trade 
will not be done for a week or 10 days, as 
the weather is very severe and indoor paint- 
ing and finishing has been seriously inter - 
^b fered with. White lead is looking brighter 
in the Old Country. Values in varnishes, 
dry colors and painters' supplies are gener- 
ally unchanged. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, 56.75 ; No. 1, $6.37^ ; No. 2, 
56 ; No. 3, 55.62^, and No. 4, 55.25, all 
f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 
or four months. 

Dry White Lead — 55.75 in casks; 
kegs, 56. 



Red Lead — Casks, $5.50; in kegs, 
55-75- 

White Zinc Paint — Pure, dry, 8c; No. 
1, 6^c; in oil, pure, 9c; No. 1, 7^c. 

Putty — We quote : Bulk, in barrels, 

52 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity, $2. 15 ; 
bladders, in barrels, $2. 20 ; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 52.35; in tins, 
52.45 to 52.75 ; in less than 100-lb. lots, 

53 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 80c; boiled, 83c, 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic. less, 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
-open, net cash, plus 2c for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and Oihawaat 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

Turpentine — Single bbls., 59c; 2 to 4 
bbls , 58c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — 51 .25 to 51.45 per gal. 

Castor Oil — 8^ to 9J^c in wholesale 
lots, and }£c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47^ to 49c. 

Cod Oil — 32^ to 35c 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resinsr 
52.75 to 54 5°. as to brand ; coal tar, 53.25 
to 53 75 ; cotton waste, 4J^ to 5^c fo, 
colored, and 6 to 7%c. for white ; oakum, 
5^ to 6y£c, and cotton oakum, 10 to 11c. 

Paris Green — Petroleum barrels, i6^c 
per lb. ; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, 17 %c. ; 25-lb. drums, 18c; i-lb. 
packages. i8j£c; ^-lb. packages, 2o)4c.; 
lib. tins, i9^c; J^-lb. tins, 21 y£c. f.o.b. 
Montreal; terms 3 percent. 30 days, or four 
months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The market continues inactive, with 
values steady. Dealers are paying the fol- 
lowing prices in the country : Heavy 
copper and wire, 13 to I3^c per lb. ; light 
copper, 12c ; heavy brass, 12c; heavy 
yellow, $)4 to 9c ; light brass, 6% to 
7c; lead, 2% to 3c per lb.; zinc, 2% to 
2_^c; iron, No. 1 wrought, 513 to 514 per 
gross ton; No. 1 cast, 513 to 51 4; stove 
plate, 58 to 59; light iron, No. 2, 54 a ton; 
malleable and steel, 54- 

PETROLEUM . 

A steadier business continues. We quote : 
"Silver Star," 15 to 16c. ; "Imperial 
Acme," i6>£ to i7^c. ; " S C. Acme," 
18 to 19c, and " Pratt's Astral," 19 to 
20c 

HIDES. 

Dealers still report trade slow, on account 
of poor demand from the tanners. Dealers 
are paying 7JS^c for No. 1 light, and tanners 
are asked to pay 8>£c for carlots. We 
quote: Light hides, 7>£c for No. 1; 6_^c 
for No. 2, and 5>£c. for No. 3. Lambskins, 
90c 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, February 9, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

ALTHOUGH trade is not active it is 
more so than it was a week ago. 
Nearly all orders for prompt ship- 
ment are small and of a sorting up nature. 
Quite a few orders are being booked for 
future delivery, but these also are small. 




The orders that are being booked for future 
delivery are mostly poultry netting, screen 
doors and windows, green wire cloth, 
spades and shovels, harvest tools, etc. 
Barb wire has been advanced 52 per ton in 
the United States, but no change has been 
made in prices for the Canadian market. 
Locally, barb wire is dull. The same ap- 
plies to galvanized wire. In smooth steel 
wire, business is light. Business in wire 
nails is still small, while cut nails are dull. 
Horse nails are moving a little better since 
the reduction in prices. Horseshoes are 
quiet. Cutlery and sporting goods continue 
quiet. Business, if anything, is a little 
better in screws. Very little is being done 
in enamelled ware and a moderate sorting- 
up trade is to be noted in tinware. Pay- 
ments are on the whole fair. 

Barb Wire — Scarcely anything is doing 
in barb wire. Notwithstanding an advance 
of 52 per ton in the price in the United 
States, the combination over there has not 
so far made any change in prices for the 
Canadian market. We still, therefore, quote 
52.97 f.o.b. Cleveland for less than carlots, 
and 52.85 in carlots. From stock, Toronto, 
53 10 per 100 lb. 

Galvanized Wire — This is also higher 
in the United States, but unchanged here, 
with business almost nill, We quote : Nos. 
6, 7 and 8, 53-55 > No. 9- $3- IQ ; No. 10, 
53.75; No. 11, 53-85; No. 12,53 25; No. 13, 
53.35; No. 14, 54 25; No. 15, 54 75, and 
No. 16, 55. 

Smooth Steel Wire — A few orders for 
oiled and annealed for future delivery have 
been booked during the past week, but 
nothing is doing in the way of immediate 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



shipment in this particular line. A little, 
howevor, is being done in hay-baling wire 
for present shipment. The base price is 
$2.80 per 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — Business is small indeed, 
and disappointing to most jobbers. The 
little that is being done is of a hand-to- 
mouth character. The base price is 
unchanged at $2. 85 per keg for less than 
carlots and $2.75 for carlots. The advance 
of $2 per ton in the United States does not 
appear in any way to affect the Canadian 
market. 

Cut Nails — Business is almost nil in cut 
nails, and the proportion is even more un- 
unsatisfactory than that in wire nails. The 
base price is $2.35 per keg. 

Horseshoes — Business is only moder- 
ate, with prices unchanged We quote 
f.o.b. Toronto : Iron shoes, No. 2 and 
largar, light, medium and heavy, $3.60 ; 
snow shoes, $3. 85 ; light steel shoes, S3. 70; 
featherweight (all sizes), $4.95 ; iron shoe*, 
No. 1 and smaller, light, medium and 
heavy (all sizes), $3.85 ; snow shoes, $4. ; 
light steel shoes, $5.9$ ; featherweight (all 
sizes), #4.95. 

Horse Nails — An error was made last 
week in quoting " C " brand at 50, 10 and 
5 per cent, the price for that brand not 
having been fixed. A new list of prices 
and new discounts have been issued, and 
the latter is now 50 and 7 y£ per cent. On 
other brands of oval head horse nails the 
discount is 50, 10 and 5 per cent., as noted 
last week, and on countersunk head, 50, 10 
and 10 per cent. Since the reduction in 
prices business has been a little better in 
horse nails. 

Screws — Trade is fair with an indication 
that people are inclined to buy a little more 
freely since the reduction in prices were 
made. It is a fact worthy of note that the 
decline in wood screws is over 43 per cent, 
from the highest point. Discounts are: Flat 
head bright, 87^ and 10 per cent.; round 
head bright, 82^ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head 
brass, 75 and 10 per cent. Round head 
bronze is unchanged at 65 per cent., and 
flat head bronze at 70 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — Just a moderate 
business is being done. We quote as 
follows : Carriage bolts (Norway), full 
square, 70 per cent. ; carriage bolts, full 
square, 70 per cent. ; common carriage 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; machine 
bolts, all sizes, 65 per cent. ; coach screws, 
75 per cent. ; sleighshoe bolts, 75 per cent. ; 
blank bolts, 65 per cent. ; bolt ends, 65 per 
cent.; nuts, square, 4>£c. off; nuts, hexagon, 
43^c. off; tire bolts, 67 % per cent.; stove 
bolts, 67 j£ ; plough bolts, 60 per cent. ; 
stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rivets and Burrs — Rather a small 



trade is to be noted in this line. Discount, 
60 and 10 per cent, on iron rivets, 55 per 
cent, on iron burrs, and 35 and 5 per cent, 
on copper rivets and burrs. 

Rope — Business continues quiet, with 
quotations as before. We quote as fol- 
lows : Sisal, 9c. per lb. base, and manila, 
13c; cotton rope, 3-16 in. and larger, 
i6%c.\ 5-32 in., 21 %c. t and % in., 22%c. 
per lb. 

Binder Twine — Very little is being 
done. We quote : Pure manila, io^c. per 
lb.; mixed, &% c. per lb. ; sisal, 7^ c. per 
lb. 

Cutlery — Taking it altogether, trade is 
not very brisk. The feature of business in 
this line is the demand on British Colum- 
bian account which the wholesalers are 
experiencing. 

Sporting Goods — Business in this line 
is quiet and featureless. 

Green Wire Cloth — A fairly good trade 
on future account is being done at $1.35 per 
100 sq. ft. 

Screen Doors and Windows — The 
improvement noted last week in this line 
for future delivery has been maintained, 
quite a few orders having been received 
during the week. 

Enamelled Ware — Business in this line 
is still quiet, being only of a small sorting- 
up nature. 

Tinware — There is still a good demand 
for milk can trimmings, and delivery is 
beginning to be made of sap buckets and 
sap spouts. 

Eavetrough — An occasional order is 
being booked for spring delivery. Prices 
are without change. 

Harvest Tools — Some business for 
future delivery has been done during the 
past week. Discount 50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels— A little business 
for spring delivery is also to be noted in this 
line. Discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

Poultry Netting— A fairly good trade 
on future account is still being done. Dis- 
count on Canadian, 50 and 5 per cent. 

Cement — There is nothing doing. We 
nominally quote in barrel lots : Canadian 
Portland, $2. 80 to #3 ; Belgian, $2.75 to #3; 
English do., $3 ; Canadian hydraulic 
cements, $1. 25 to 81.50; calcined plaster, 
$1.90 ; asbestos cement, $2.50 per bbl. 

METAL, S. 

Business in metals during the past week 
has been a little more active lately. The 
most active lines are Canada plates and 
galvanized sheets. Our quotations on terne 
plates are 25c. lower. 

Pig Iron — Business is quiet and prices 
are rather easy. We quote $17 for Cana- 
dian iron in 100-ton lots. 

Bar Iron — Business is fair, with the base 
price ruling at $165 to $1.70 per 100 lb. 



f\ k IX|™\/'0 The original and only Genuint Pre- 
I 1 11 |\ P T «N paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
Uni\LI \J 6d. and is. Canisters. 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England, 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL, 




gCOVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.V. 

YANKEE SNAPS. 

Made in all styles and sizes. 

For Sale by 
all Jobbers at Manufacturers' Prices. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 



' ft'AU-.-t ^1 




Largest Variety, 

Toilet, Hand, Electric Power 



ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 

So ©ep Shearing Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOB CATALOOUB TO 
Asaarlaaa Shearer Mfg. Co.. Naahna. H.H..CB4 




Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



BJRMAN & SONS', LIMITED cuppers 

The Warwick Clipper cuts over 3 teeth, as 
supplied to Her Majesty's War Office to clip the 
cavalry horses in South Africa. 
Barbers' Clippers in many qualities. 
Power Horse Clippers as supplied to the Czar 
of Russia's Stables and Field Marshal Lord Roberta. 
Power Sheep Shearing Machines. 
BURMAN & SONS, Limited, Birmingham. 



LUBRICATING OIL 

27 to 28 Gravity. Delivered in 
barrels F.O.B. Cars here at 20c. 
per gallon, barrel included. 



B. S. VANTUYL, 



Petrolia, Ont 



Pullman Sash Balance Co, 

Makers of the 

"Pullman" 
Hardware 
Specialties 

Main Office and Works, 

Rochester, N.Y.. U.S.A. 

On aale all round the globe. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



Pig Tin — A fair movement is to be noted 
in this line, and prices are unchanged at 32 
to 33c. per lb. Tin is lower in London, but 
steady in New York. 

Tinplates — Trade is fairly good and 
stocks, with 'at least some houses, are 
becoming depleted. Prices are unchanged. 

Tinned Sheets — A few shipments are 
being made for milk can purposes, but, 
generally speaking, trade is quiet. 

Terne Plates— These are lower, at 
$8.50 to $10.50. Business is light. 

Black Sheets — Trade has been active 
during the week in both large and small 
lots. The base price is $3 30, as reduced 
last week. 

Galvanized Sheets — The demand is 
fair, and quite a few orders have been booked 
for future delivery. American are quoted at 
$4.50, and English at $4 75. 

Canada PlatAs — A few lots are going 
out, but trade is, *on the whole, quiet. A 
few orders have been booked for importa- 
tion during the week. We quote: All dull, 
$3 ; half and half, $3 15, and all bright, 
$3.65 to $3.75- 

Iron Pipe — Business is rather quiet this 
week with prices as before. We quote : 
Black pipe % in., $3. 00; y% in., S3 00; yi 
in., #3 05; % in., $3.20; 1 in., $4. 60; 1% 
in., $6.35; 1 ^in., $7.55; 2 in., $10.10. 
Galvanized pipe is as follows : ]/ z in., 
$4.65; tf in., $5.35; 1 in., $7 25; 1% in., 
$9-75; 1 'A i n -i $"-25; 2 in., $15 50. 

Hoop Steel — Business in this line has 
improved a little during the past week. The 
base price is still $3.10. 

Copper — Ingot copper is quiet, but in 
sheet copper a fair trade has been experi- 
enced during the past week. We quote : 
Ingot, 19 to 20c; bolt or bar, 23^ to 25c; 
sheet, 23 to 23 j^c. 

Brass — A fair trade is to be noted. Dis- 
count on rod and sheet 15 per cent. 

Solder — A fairly active trade has been 
experienced during the past week. We 
quote : Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed, 19c; 
ditto, commercial, i8^c. ; refined, i8j£c; 
wiping, 18;. 

Lead — No improvement is to be noted, 
the demand still being light at 4^ to 5c. 

Zinc Spelter — Trade is quiet at 6 to 
6j£c. per lb. 

Zinc Sheet — A fair trade is to be noted 
in this line. We quote casks at $675 to 
$7, and part casks at $7 to $7.50. 

Antimony — Business in this line is quiet, 
the improvement noted last week evidently 
not having been maintained. We quote 1 1 
to IIJ^C. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The movement is light at the moment, 
but a large number of orders are coming in 
for spring delivery. The markets are steady. 
L'nseed oil declined 4c. per gal. here last 



84,000 Daily Production. 
5 Factories. 5 Brands. 



NICHOLSON FILES 



For sala ail 
over the World 




20 Governments. 85% R.R., 90% Largest Mfrs. 70% of Total Production of America. 

NICHOLSON FILE CO., PROVIDENCE, R.I., U.S.A. 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 



Established 1773 



Manufacturers of Polished. Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 

Designs on application. 
Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : 107 Cannon Street, London EC —128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow — 12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par dise Street, Birmingham Telegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens." 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 



of every description. 

Reliable Tools at low prices. 




A. SHAW & SON, 52 Rahere St., Goswell Rd„ London, B.C.. Eng The oldest house in the 

trade, lineal successors of the inventor and patentee, J SHAW. 



Saturday, and is now steady at the new 
prices. Turpentine and white lead are 
firm. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6 87^; No. 1, $6.50; No. 2. $6. 12 yi; 
No. 3, $5. 75; No. 4 $5 37 '<£; dry white lead 
in casks, $6. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 5601b., 
$5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $5 to $5 25 ; ditto, 
kegs of 100 lb. ; $5. 25 to $5 50. 

Litharge — Genuine, 7 to 7yic. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 8 to 8^c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. 

Whiting — 60c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 75 to 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Faris Green — Bbls., i6^c. ; kegs, 1 7c. ; 
50 and ioo-lb. drums, 17 yic; 25-lb. drums, 
18c. ; 1 lb. papers, lSyic. ; i-lb. tins, i<j%c. ; 
y z lb. papers, 2oj^c; J^ lb. tins, 21 y£c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., #2.20; blad 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.35; bulk in bbls., 
$2 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 lb., 
$2. 1 5 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $3. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1 .90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, #2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10;. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1 .20 to $1.30 per 
gal.; No. 1 quality, $1 per gal. 

Castor Oil— East India, in cases, 10 to 
io^c. per lb. and ioyi to 11c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 76c. ; 
boiled, 79c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 75c; 
boiled, 78c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, 2c. less. 



Turpentine — Single barrels, 59c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 58c, to all points in Ontario. 
For less quantities than barrels, 5c. per 
gallon extra will be added, and for 5-gallon 
packages, 50c, and 10 gallon packages, 
80c. will be charged. 

GLASS. 
There is not yet any information re prices 
on glass for import. The movement from 
stock is light at steady figures. We 
still quote first break locally : Star, 
in 50-foot boxes, $2.10, and 100-foot 
boxes, #4; double diamond under 26united 
inches, #6, Toronto, Hamilton and Lon- 
don ; terms 4 months or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

The movement is moderate though the 
demand is good. Prices are firm. We quote 
jobbers' prices as follows: Agricultural 
scrap, 55c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 55c. 
per cwt. ; stove cast, 35c; No. 1 wrought 
50c. per 100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, io%c. ; heavy 
copper, I2^c. ; coil wire scrap, 13c. ; 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10 to 
io^c. ; heavy red brass, loyic; scrap 
lead, 3c. ; zinc, 2j£c ; scrap rubber, 6^c; 
good country mixed rags, 65 to 75c; clean 
dry bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 

PETROLEUM. 

The demand is falling off somewhat. 
Prices are steady. We quote: Pratt's 
Astral, 17 to I7j£c. in bulk (barrels, $1 
extra) ; American water white, 17 to 
I7j^c. in barrels ; Photogene, 16 % to 
17c; Sarnia water white, 16 to ldyic in 
barrels; Sarnia prime white, 15 to i5>£c. in 
barrels. 

COAL. 

Pea size is firm at the high prices now 
quoted. Other sizes are steady, with a 
scarcity of nut. We quote anthracite on 
cars Buffalo and bridges : Grate, $4. 75 
per gross ton and 54.24 per net ton ; egg, 
stove and nut, ^5 per gross ton and $4. 46 
per net ton. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Linseed oil was reduced 4c. last Saturday. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MONTREAL RETAIL ASSOCIATION. 



THE Montreal Retail Hardware Associ- 
ation held another well attended, 
enthusiastic and fruitful meeting at 
the Monument National last Wednesday 
evening. 

President Martineau occupied the chair, 
and associated with him about the table 
were, besides the secretary, ist Vice- 
President D. Drysdale and 2nd Vice- 
President L. J. A. Surveyer. Among others 
present were: A.Prudhomme, J.Prudhomme, 
U. Granger, W. Granger, E. D. Colleret, 
Leger (Lecroix & Leger), L. Prevost, 
Huberdeau, Chausse, Leblanc, Belanger, 
Jubinville, Watts, Mailhot, Leblanc and 
Mederic Martineau. 

When the minutes had been read and 
approved, the president scanned the faces 
of the audience to see if he could seek out, 
any of the tar-paper manufacturers who 
had been invited to the meeting to discuss 
the common interests of the manufacturers 
and retailers. Unsuccessful, he appealed to 
the secretary who read a letter from Mr. 
Patterson, stating that he would be unable 
to come on account of sickness. The 
absence of the other invited guests was not 
explained. However, a copy of a letter 
from the Canada Hardware Company to the 
Patterson Manufacturing Company was read, 
showing that at least one wholesale house 
has recognized the question of the retailers' 
pleas and is willing to aid them in the attain - 
ment of their objects. It read as follows : 
The Patterson Manufacturing Co., Montreal. 

Dear Sirs, — Replying to yours of yesterday, we 
are pleased to say that we are of the op nion that 
the members of the Retail Hardware Association 
should be allowed 5 per cent, off the face of the in- 
voice on building paper, coal tar, etc., as we know 
for a fact that the merchants of Montreal in general 
are selling these goods at a loss, as they have to 
compete with some of the smaller jobbers who are 
selling to consumers, and some large retailers who 
can buy the maximum quantity, so that the ordinary 
merchants are obliged to sell these goods at cost 10 
keep their customers. We are also of the opinion 
that the jobbers should be allowed to give same 
rebates for same amount as the manufacturers, so 
that we can fill the orders of the larger buyers who 
can purchase $1,200 worth in a year. 

Trusting this will have your consideration, we 
remain, 

Yours truly, 
The Canada Hardware Co., 

Per A. M. St. Arnaud, Mgr. 

This letter aroused a keen discussion. 
Finally, Mr. Watts moved, seconded by 
Mr. Mailhot, that a delegation be appointed 
to wait on the manufacturers to explain to 
them the objects and aims of the associa- 
tion, the present difficulties of the retailers, 
and to ask them for a rebate of 7^ per 
cent, for the members of the association, to 
be paid every six months. This motion 
passed unanimously and the interviewing 
committee will be Messrs. Martineau, Prud- 
homme, Surveyer and Drysdale. A report 
upon these interviews may be expected next 
meeting, February 20. 



A discussion then took place upon the 
fact of the wholesalers selling retail and the 
idea seemed to prevail that their entreaties 
had had no effect as yet. Some members 
threw out plans by whrch the retailers them- 
selves might do something to have this 
practice discontinued or at least curtailed. 
One member said that a certain hardware 
merchant was getting his customers into the 
habit of going to the wholesale houses by 
sending them there for goods which he did 
not have in stock. An attempt will be 
made to have this stopped. 

Mr. Belanger proposed, seconded by Mr. 
Huberdeau, that the committee appointed 
to wait on the paper manufacturers should 
also be charged with the duty of visiting 
the wholesalers and urging upon them the 
necessity of going out of the retail business. 
Adopted. 

Mr. Mederic Martineau gave a notice of 
motion that Lacroix & Leger be admitted to 
the membership of the association at the 
next meeting. 

Mr. Martineau also proposed a resolution 
of condolence to be tendered to Mr. E. 
Lecours, of Amoit, Lecours & Lariviere, 
who has lately passed through sad bereave- 
ment on account of the death of his wife. 
In the motion was included the idea that the 
letter of condolence be published in the 
daily newspapers and Hardware and 
Metal. The president suggested that the 
latter paper be paid for the publication of 
this item, but a representative present in- 
formed him that this paper never published 
any paid reading-matter, and that the pub 
Ushers would be pleased to publish an item 
of this character. 

The gathering then adjourned to Wed- 
nesday, February 20. 



HONORS FOR MR IRVING. 

As Mr. John Irving, the newly appointed 
agent for the Nova Scotia Steel Co., was 
taking leave of his firm, The Montreal 
Rolling Mills Co., last week, a family 
gathering was held in the manager's office, 
Montreal, and Mr. Irving was presented 
with a purse by the firm and a handsome 
cabinet of cut glassware by his fellow- 
employes. Mr. Irving leaves with his 
former associates' best wishes for his 
success in New Glasgow. 



CRAMP STEEL WORKS STARTED. 

The mayor of Collingwood, Mr. T. Silver, 
was a visitor at the Parliament buildings on 
Wednesday. Mr. Silver was there in con- 
nection with some additional water lots 
which the town proposes giving the Cramp 
Ontario Steel Co. The work on the com- 



pany's ore docks will commence this week, 
and, it is said, that when completed they 
will be superior to the best ore docks at 
Cleveland. Mr. Silver says that the town is 
booming. Work is being carried on at the 
steel shipyard on the new steel ship for the 
Beatty Line. This ship will be one of the 
finest on the great lakes. The Cramp 
Ontario Steel Co. intend doing as much as 
possible in excavating the ground for their 1 
furnaces this winter. They expect to blow 
in the first furnace in October next. 



ADVANCE IN WIRE AND WIRE NAILS 
Iron Age. January 31 : An advance was 
made on January 20, by The American 
Steel and Wire Co. to take effect at once, of 
$2 per ton on wire nails and plain and barb 
wire. The advance came unexpectedly to 
the trade, as no intimation had been given 
of an advance at this time. It should be 
borne in mind, however, that shipments 
from Pittsburgh after February i, to points 
affected by the reduction in freights will not 
net the full advance of io5. The announce- 
ment of a reduction in freight rates has not 
had the effect of increasing orders for future 
delivery to any noticeable extent. Quota- 
tions at the advance are as follows, f.o.b, 
Pittsburgh, terms 60 days, or 2 per cent, 
discount for cash in 10 days : 

To jobbers in carload lots $2 30 

To jobbers in less than carload lots 2 35 

To retailers in carload lots 2 40 

To retailers in less than carload lots 2 50 

PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Duncan Gunn, hardware merchant, 
Manitou, Man., is in Toronto this week. 

MAKES BUSINESS BETTER. 

Editor Hardware and Metal, — We 
have just bought over the stock of Adams & 
Coate, Kingsville, Ont., and, as we feel that 
the hardware business is far easier to run 
with such a valuable paper as yours, we 
would ask you to send it regularly to us, 
beginning February 2, 1901. 

Telfer & Oliver. 
King-sville, Ont., February 2 1901. 



CEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, and 
13 endorsed "Tenier for Elev.it >r Wharf Extension at 
Depot Harbour, Ont." will be received at this ortioe until 
Fridiy, 22nd February, 1901, for the construction of an 
addition ill length to the Elevator Wharf at Depot Harbour, 
Mmkoka District, Ontario. 

Plain and specifications can be seen at thij Department; 
at the offices of Mr. H. A. Gray, resident engineer, Con- 
federation Life Building, Toronto ; The Resident Engineer, 
Room 411, Merchants Bank Building, St. James St., Mont- 
real ; Mr. Ph. Beland, Clerk of Works, l'o t < iltire, Quebec, 
and on application t»the Postmaster, at Parry Sound, Ont. 
Forms of render can also be obtained at the above men- 
tioned places. 

Persons tendering are notified that tenders will not be 
considered unlets made on the printed forms supplied, and 
signed with their actual signatures. 

The contractor will be required to conform to regu'ations 
to be made by the Governor-3eneral-iu-L'ouncil, respect- 
ing the accommodation, medical treatment and sanitary 
protsotion of thewjrking men employed on the work. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted cheque 
on a chartered bank, made payable to the order or the 
Honourable the Minitterof Public Works, for twenty-five 
thousand dollars (425,000). The cheque will be forfeited if 
the parly decline the contract or fail to complete the work 
contracted for. If the tender be not accepted, the cheque 
will be returned 

The Department doej not bind itself to accept the lowest 
or any tender. 

By order, 

J03 R. ROY, 

Acting Secretary. 
De.artmeut of Public Works of Canada. 
Ottawa, January 22nd, 19i 1. 

Newspapers inserting this advertisement without authority 
from the Department, will not be paid for it. (7) 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



20 



BRO WNIN G Automatic Repeating Pistol 



' SEVEN SHOT- 

SAFE, RAPID, ACCURATE 



Catalogue and 
Price on 
Application. 




CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO., - Montreal 



a 



J9 



BEAVER 
Portland Cement 



Stands the very highest requirements. 

Great Strength—Absolute Soundness. 

Extremely Finely Ground. 



"THE MARSHALL" 

Up-to-Date 

Adjustable Display Stand 
^ Window Dres: 



THE CANADIAN PORTLAND CEMENT CO., 

Limited 
Manufacturers, 

Works at STRATHCONA and MARLBANK, ONT. 

Daily Capacity 1,800 Barrels. 



For Prices, Tests, etc., write 

THE RATHBUN COMPANY 

Sole Sale Agents ...DeSGrOtltO 




Easily adjusted to 



More than 20 Different Positions. 

Having a ledge on each of the shelves to support the goods 
when at different angles. 

ORNAMENTAL, HIGHLY FINISHED, 
STRONGLY MADE. 



Manufactured by- 



E. M. MARSHALL, S T IA - T 



Send for Catalogue and Prices 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



REVISED HARDWARE TRADE PRICE LIST 



HORSE 



. TRADE 



c 



MARK 



NAILS 



No. 


U 


1 2 


I I 


10 


\ 


8 


7 


6 


5 


4 


Length 


3 l /s 


2j4 


*x 


2^ 


ty* 


2^8 


»tf 


2>6 


2 


\"yi in. 


List 


$ .20 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.20 


.22 


.24 


.28 


•32 


.48 cents 



In boxes of 25-lbs. each, (either loose, or in 5-lb. cardboard packages). 
Extra for 1 -lb. cardboard packages ^c. per lb. net. 

RACE SHOE, OR PLATE NAILS. 

EXTRA SELECTED. 



No. 
Length 
List 



*i Y? inch. 
$2.50 



i$4 inch. 
1.50 



3 
1 24 inch. r~£hort Oval and 
.75 per lb. t Short Csk. 



In boxes of 5-lbs., 10-lbs and 25-lbs. each, i-lb. packages. 






Discount, 50 per cent, and 7^ per cent, (to Hardware Trade only). 

Delivered free on board cars or boat at Montreal. 

Terms Cash : Discount 3 per cent, for prompt settlement within 30 days. 



PATTERNS AND SIZES. 



Oval Head 

Nos. 4 to 14. 

Short Oval 

Nos. 1 to 8, 



Countersunk Head 
Nos. 5 to 12. 

Short Countersunk 
Nos. 3 to 8. 



Revised and Adopted. 
Montreal, Feb. 7th, 1901. 



FARRIERS' PRICE LIST 



HORSE 



TRADE 



c 



MARK 



NAILS 









Adopted Feb. 


7th, 1901 










No. 


14 


12 11 


10 


9 


8 


7 


6 


5 


4 


Length 


i l A 


2l A -V\ 


2^ 


*% 


2 -'S 


•X 


2}i 


2 


lyi in. 


Price 


$2.50 


2.50 2.50 

In boxes of 25-lbs. 


2.50 

each. 


2.50 


2-75 


3.00. 


3-5° 


4.00 


b.oo per box. 






Terms Cash: Discount 3 per 


cent, for 


prompt 


settlement 


within 30 


days. 





SPECIAL NOTICE: 

The above list represents the minimum retail prices at which our "(J" 
brand Horse Shoe Nails may be sold to Farriers in the Provinces of Ontario, 
Quebec, and Maritime Provinces. 

CANADA HORSE NAIL COMPANY. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 2? 



THE SPECIAL NUMBER 



r 



OF= 



HARDWARE / METAL 



which we are now preparing, will 
be a very handsome one, and good 
in every way. It will interest 
readers, and pay advertisers. 

As every retailer interested in 
hardware and kindred lines will get 
a copy, every manufacturer and 
wholesaler should be represented 
in the advertising pages. 

The MacLean Publishing Co 



LIMITED. 



TORONTO. 
MONTREAL. 
LONDON, ENG 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, February 4. 1901. 

BUSINESS continues exceedingly quiet, 
and no change of price is reported. 
Preparations for spring and the final 
winding up of stock taking are the principal 
employments at the various wholesale 
houses. 

Price list for the week is as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

" 11 4 00 

" 12 4 °5 

13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 + 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 45 

" 16 and 20 3 5o 

10 3 55 

8 365 

6 3 7o 

4 3 8 s 

3 4 io 

Cut nails, 3otooody 3 o 

" 30 tO 40 3 Oj 

" 10 to 16 3 i 

8 3 15 

6 3 2 

4 3 3o 

3 3 6 s 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 495 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.50 basis. 
Swedish iron, $4-5° basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 °° 

Spring steel 3 2 5 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb.. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 °° 

28 gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 55 

26 gauge 8 80 

28 gauge 8 00 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 12 75 

IXX " 14 75 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 75 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over2inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $10 00 

" # 10 50 

" % and 5-16 11 00 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 13 50 

" H 14 °° 

% and 5-16 1450 

Solder 21 % 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 16 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 p.c. 

Flat " brass 70 p.c. 

Round" " 60 and s p.c. 

Coach 57 # P-c. 

Bolts, carriage 42^ p.c. 

Machine 45 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c 

Rivets, iron 5° P-c. 

Copper, No. 8 5°c lb. 

Spades and shovels 4° P-c 

Harvest tool* 5°, »nd 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 5° 



No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 175 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

American , M 16 25 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 75 

Chilled 7 50 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

" plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 24MC 

Prime white American 23c. 

Water white Canadian 21c. 

Prime white Canadian 19c. 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 68 

Less than barrel lots 73 

Linseed oil , raw 87 

Boiled 90 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 25% 

Eldorado engine 24}^ 

Atlantic red 27 K 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23 !4 to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. 11 % 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 to 50 5 50 

51 to 60 6 00 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2K 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 25 

No 1 700 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, .per gal. $1.30 tojjSi.90 

NOTES. 

H. B. Ashelman, who has been in charge 

of the National Cash Register Co.'s branch 



in this city for the past year, is leaving to 
rejoin his brother, B. F. Ashelman, in the 
Fargo agency of the company, where he was 
before coming to Winnipeg. Mr. Ashelman 
has made many friends in the Canadian 
West, who are sorry that he is returning to 
his old home. Mr, Whipple, of Wisconsin, 
succeeds Mr. Ashelman. 

The partnership of Rosen & Duggan, ' 
Selkirk, has been dissolved, Jacob Duggan 
continuing the business. 

The new Commercial Club of Winnipeg 
has purchased the old Ontario Bank for a 
club house, and will have the same hand- 
somely fitted for the new club. It is a 
central location and admirably adapted 
for the purpose. The club is making rapid 
strides in membership. 



ODD ADVERTISEMENTS. 

An observer of the peculiarities of people 
copied, according to an exchange, the 
following from advertisements from various 
sources : 

"Annual sale on. Don't go elsewhere 
to be cheated — come in here." 

" A lady wants to sell her piano, as she 
is going abroad in a strong iron frame." 

" Mr. Brown, furrier, begs to announce 
that he will make up gowns, capes, etc., 
for ladies of their own skins." 

*' Bulldog for sale ; he will eat anything ; 
very fond of children." 

"Widow in comfortable circumstances 
wishes to marry two sons." 

"To be disposed of, a small phaeton, the 
property of a gentleman with a movable 
headpiece as good as new." 



"ANCHOR" BRAND 
Superfine Coach Colors 

GROUND IN JAPAN. 

Our Coach Colors are largely used by manufacturers, and are 
giving general satisfaction. 

The Pigments, Colors and Grinding Japans used are 

all Of OUT own manufacture, ensuring uniformity in quality, 
and permanence of color. 

"Anchor" Coach Colors are quick sellers, and a profitable line 
to keep in stock. 

SAMPLE COLOR BOOKS ON APPLICATION. 

We also manufacture a full line of High-Grade Coach Varnishes, and 
have reason to know that our Pale Rubbing Varnish and Special Gold Size 

Japan are the best on the market. 

HENDERSON & POTTS, 

HALIFAX AND MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



1901. THE MANUFACTURERS' LIST 1901. 
BUYERS' GUIDE OF CANADA. 

FOR UP-TO-DATE BUYERS. 



There are few men in business 
at the beginning of this 20th Cen- 
tury who do not at times need the 
information this book contains. 
The smallest as well as the 
largest buyer can profit by having 
it at hand. 

We do not tell you how to buy 
goods. We suppose you know that 
or you would not be in business. 
We only tell you where you can get 
any article manufactured in Canada 
that you may want . 

We index 22,000 articles and 
name 10,000 manufacturers in this 
book. 

We have to travel the length 
and breadth of Canada to gather 
this information, for it cannot be 
got together intelligibly in any 
other way. 

This book is in the interests 
of all manufacturing industries in 
this country using electric, steam 
or water power. 

This work is just out of press, 
bound in cloth, 8x10, stamped in 
gold, and contains 483 pages. The 



publication is compiled from a 
personal canvass of the Dominion, 
and VERIFIED to date. 

There are 7,800 Manufacturers 
alphabetically arranged for ad- 
dressing purposes, giving the kind 
of factory of each. In addition 
to this, there are classified in 
alphabetical order, and not in- 
cluded in the above, 350 Butter 
Factories and Creameries, 800 
Cheese Factories, 250 Fish, Lob- 
ster and Salmon Packing Houses, 
150 Electric Light Plants. 45 
Steam Railway Corporations, 500 
Shippers of Grain, Eggs, Hides, 
Wool, etc., etc. We also give a 
list of 1,500 Merchants who carry 
a full line of Hardware. 

This work will fully meet your 
requirements for Addressing, Buy- 
ing or Selling purposes. 

Mailed to any address on re- 
ceipt of price, $5.00. Money in 
letter at sender's risk. Express 
or Money Orders cost but 5c, 
which you can deduct from the 
order. Personal cheques cost 25c. 
for collection. 



THE MANUFACTURERS' LIST CO., 



M. J. HENRY, Sole Proprietor. 



Publishers, 34 Victoria Street, TORONTO. 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



SEWER VENTILATION. 

IN a system of sewer ventilation now being 
introduced by J. Stone & Co., a Dept- 
ford firm, 'according to Hardwareman, 
water is employed as a means both to ex- 
tract foul gas from the sewer and to purify it 
before it is discharged into the atmosphere. 
The apparatus consists of a small tank which 
is placed at any convenient position in the 
upper part of the sewer. In this tank, 
which is always filled with water up to a 
certain level, there is an ejector arrange- 
ment, laid horizontally, which is worked by 
a jet of water derived from the ordinary 
water main. The mere act of admitting 
the water from the main puts the appartus 
into action, and it so continues until the 
water is shut off. The suction produced by 
the jet is arranged to do three things : 
First, to draw in water from the tank (the 
ejector arrangement being submerged) ; 
secondly, to suck in air from the sewer ; 
and, thirdly, to suck in fresh air from the 
outside. 

Thus, the sewer gas is thoroughly churned 
up with clean water and fresh air by the 
action of the jet, and the result is to wash it 
of its offensive constituents, the water, after 
use, passing away down the sewer, while 
the purified air escapes to the atmosphere. 
Air taken from a sewer in Deptford, in 
which this apparatus has been fitted for 
about a year, was submitted to bacterio- 
logical examination. When an untreated 
sample was used to infect a gelatine culture, 
three days' incubation yielded 26 colonies 
of micro organisms visible to the naked eye, 
1 q being molds ; but, with a treated sample 
used in the same way, only three colonies 
were to be discerned, and none of them 
were molds. 

In another experiment the air in the 
sewer was artifically contaminated with 
sulphuretted hydrogen and ammonium sul- 
phide so that when taken into the apparatus 
it contained 0.71 per cent, of the latter and 
0.32 per cent, of the former ; analysis of 
the issuing air showed that the sulphuretted 
hydrogen had been reduced to 0.04 per 
cent., while the amount of ammonium sul- 
phide was inappreciable. The cost of 
water for treating 10,000 cubic feet of gas 
is put at about is. 6d., and it is considered 
that only intermittent employment of the 
apparatus, at times when the ordinary 
means of ventilation are particularly in- 
efficient, would be required. One machine, 
it is stated, could deal satisfactorily with 



half a mile of sewer, and the cost of its 
installation would compare favorably with 
that of the tall ventilating shafts which are 
employed in some districts, even if they 
were erected only at such long intervals as 
200 or 300 yards. 



TORONTO'S BIG HOTEL. 

The contract for the mammoth hotel, 
which is to be erected on Victoria, King 
and Colborne streets, Toronto, has at last 
been let. A meeting of the board of direc- 
tors of the company was held on Wednes- 
day to consider the tenders for demolishing 
the buildings now on the premises and 
construction of the hotel. The lowest 
tender, that of James Howard, jr., of 
Pittsburg, Penn., was accepted, and he 
will start as soon as the contracts are 
signed. His contract includes all the 
construction work that will be done. The 
plumbing, heating, etc., will probably be 
sublet. 

SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

The Baptists of Owen Sound, Ont., pur- 
pose building a new church this summer, 
which will probably cost from $10,000 to 
J? 1 2,000. 

H. T. Godwin is preparing to build a 
house in Richmond, Ont. 

John Weir is building a residence in 
Malvern, Ont. 

McCormack & Hagarty, contractors, 
Brockville, Ont., are making an extension 
to the Canadian Oak Belting Co., Brock- 
ville. In the spring a large addition will be 
erected. 

Thomas Hooper, architect, is calling for 
tenders for a two-storey brick residence and 
office at the corner of Douglas and Kane 
streets, Victoria. The building is to be 
modern in every respect, including electric 
bells, speaking tubes, and lighted by elec- 
tricity. 

WINNIPEG BUILDING PROSPECTS. 

The indications are that next summer 
will prove active in building opera- 
tions in Winnipeg. It is understood that 
Architect Brown is preparing plans for a 
700 room apartment house in the South 
End, to cost $50,000 ; S. Spence, of the 
Gault House, has secured a 75-ft, frontage 
on Portage avenue, where he intends to 
erect an up-to-date hotel ; J. A. M. Aikins 
will erect a residence ; The Toronto Type 
Foundry Co. , Arthur Congdon and George 
Gregg have secured lots and, it is under- 
stood, will build this summer. 



BRAZING BRASS TO COPPER. 

THE best solder for uniting brass to , 
copper is soft brass, which, as stated 
in a technical journal, will melt 
much easier than the brass which is to be 
joined to the copper, otherwise the work 
would melt at the same time as the ' 
solder. 

The edge of the work must be carefully 
cleaned, and then the parts brought 
together in their proper place and secured 
with iron wire. The flux to be used is borax, 
rubbed up in water until it is like a fine 
cream. The solder, which may be in the 
form of beads, strips or wire, is next distri- 
buted along the joint. The amount of heat 
and the method of applying it depend 
entirely upon the size of the work to be done. 
If the work is small the blowpipe is by far 
the most convenient and safest, because if 
the heat is too great there is danger that the 
brass part of the work will be melted. The 
heat is to be applied until the solder melts. 
As soon as the solder melts or "flushes," 
the work should be struck so as to jar it just 
enough to make the solder flow into the 
joint. To find out whether the solder is soft 
enough for the work, a piece may be laid 
upon a bit of brass of the same kind as that 
of which the work is made and put it into 
the fire. If the solder melts considerably 
sooner than the brass it will be safe to use it 
for the work. If, on the other hand, they 
both melt about the same time, a softer 
solder will be needed. Spelter solder may 
also be used for the purpose. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

J. A. Carslake, plumber, Stratford, Ont., 
has assigned to John B. Capatine. 

Thomas Forest, plumber, Montreal, has 
assigned, and a meeting of his creditors 
will be held on February 12. His liabilities 
are about $6, 500. The chief creditors are 
the Sun Life Insurance Company, mortgage, 
$3,450 : the Jas. Robertson Co., $650 ; C. 
Rochon, mortgage, $600 ; J. A. Beaudoin, 
mortgage, $1,000; Theo. Theberge, $238. 

A. L. Tanguay & Co. have registered as 
plumbers in St. Henri de Montreal, Que. 

R. H. Smith. Tilbury, Ont., is advertis-' 
ing his electric light plant for sale. 

During the month of January, Mr. Dore, 
sanitary engineer, Montreal, examined 27 
building plans, visited 147 houses where 
plumbing required inspection, issued 16 
notices about improper workmanship, and 
issued four plumbers' certificates. He com- 
plains that many plumbers are using lighter 
material than the by-law calls for. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



^-n 




Nippers and Plyers of Utica's name 
Put to hard usage remain just the same. 
Only the best is made in that town 
All buyets' wives can have a new gown. 

MORAL. 

The Utica Drop Forge & Tool Co. make the best. Are they too 
good for you ? 

UTICA DROP FORGE & TOOL CO , 
296 Broadway, NEW YORK. 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS